Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 2:5

His mother *said to the servants, "Whatever He says to you, do it."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Cana;   Jesus, the Christ;   Marriage;   Mary;   Miracles;   Parents;   Water;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Resurrection;   Thompson Chain Reference - Mary;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Entertainments;   Marriage;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Cana;   Feasts;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Galilee;   Grapes;   John, gospel of;   Marriage;   Miracles;   Palestine;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Joy;   Miracle;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Marriage;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Cana;   Marriage-Feasts;   Wine;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Joseph;   Manoah;   Mary, the Virgin;   Pearl;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Banquet;   Fulfill;   John, the Gospel of;   Mary;   Sign;   Water;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Deacon;   Joy;   Marriage;   Mary;   Meals;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Announcements of Death;   Appreciation (of Christ);   Brotherhood (2);   Celibacy (2);   Common Life;   Dates (2);   Happiness;   John (the Apostle);   Minister, Ministration;   Perfect Perfection;   Pleasure;   Reality;   Sea of Galilee;   Service;   Toleration, Tolerance;   Wealth (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Marriage;   Melchisedec, Melchizedek ;   Miracles;   New Testament;   Wine;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cana;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Flag;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eschatology of the New Testament;   Mary;   Uncleanness;  
Devotionals:
Today's Word from Skip Moen - Devotion for November 30;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

His mother saith, etc. - The virgin seems to have understood our Lord as hinted above. It was not yet time to grant them a supply, because the want had not as yet been generally felt. But, silently receiving the respectful caution, she saw that the miracle should be wrought when it best suited the purposes of the Divine wisdom.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 2:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-2.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

His mother saith … - It is evident from this verse that his mother did not understand what he had said as a harsh reproof and repulse, but as an indication of his willingness at the proper time to furnish wine. In all this transaction he evinced the appropriate feelings of a son toward a mother.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-2.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 2:5

Whatsoever Be saith unto you, do it

Implicit obedience to Christ

That is a remarkable claim.
It is almost startling to be told that, without leaving room for our own opinion, whatever a certain voice says to us we are to do. That claim can be made for no created intelligence. But it can be made for Christ. And this is the language of one who, so far, knew Him best on earth. Never before, nor since, has mother been able to say of son that ‘tis well to do whatever he requires. Nor is our personal witness wanting; it is evident that the world’s miseries are due to disobedience to Him; and it acquires a more extraordinary significance when we remember that He hath something to say about everything we do or ought to do. He not only assumes to guide at crises, but at every step.

I. WHAT MUST PRECEDE THIS OBEDIENCE.

1. Subjection: Ye are not your own; He has a right to me by His redemption. I cannot take my own course or follow my own will without robbing Him.

2. A listening for His voice, a training our ear to recognize Him. For though He may have something to say, and indeed may say it, it does not follow that we hear. How can we hear whenever He speaks, how be sure that it is He? It is easy to follow caprice or self-will, and think we are following Him. Whatever He says is in harmony with this Divine Book; to knew what He says we must come here, and if coming here we sincerely say, “Speak Lord, for Thy servant heareth!” He will speak. But we cannot always retire to search the Book, nor even pause to consider what is right--how can He control us then? Obey; obey and you will come instinctivelyto know your Lord’s will, as (as one has said) “by copying perpetually a master painter’s works, we can at last recognize his touch unerringly.”

3. A determination to trust Him. For it demands courage to commit ourselves blindly to another. It were easy to do something that He tells us, but--“whatsoever” Ah! many a time He will say do this, go there, lay down that joy, take up that burden, when it will seem to be wrong; then it is when the text comes home to us, that we need courage to obey, and may fail through fear. Courage is wanted to take the first bold plunge into the sea, but when we find its sustaining power is trustworthy, we fear no more: so with the will of Christ. But how can we bring ourselves to that abandonment. Only by remembering that Christ cannot lead us wrong. Infinite wisdom! Infinite love!

II. WHAT THIS OBEDIENCE INVOLVES.

1. It is Contrary to questioning. We may not discover it at once; for gracious purpose He may keep us waiting, but ere the time for action comes He will reveal enough. Then questioning should end. He will not debate with us. It is not unlikely that He may call us to strange things--things as strange as when He called Abram, or Moses, or Jonah, or Peter. Now, when those strange commands come, which seem to involve so much risk, and which lead into the dark--then is the time to recall this word, and to act upon it.

2. It is contrary to delay. Delay is disobedience. When we dare not reply “I will not,” we sometimes reply “I will, but not now,” and quiet our conscience with the idea that this is not refusal. Jesus said, “Follow Me!” and he answered, “Lord, suffer me first,” etc., and the Lord said “No.” So we respond to some of His commands, “Lord, suffer me first to do something else,” “Seek ye first the kingdom,” etc.

3. It is contrary to consideration of cost. It is well to settle with ourselves that we cannot follow Christ without soon, and often, coming to what is hard. “If any man will come after Me, let him take up his cross,” etc.

4. It is contrary to inquiry about other matters. For it is one of our most dangerous temptations to neglect clear duty because of what is not clear. What is clear may be but little, a mere foothold on “a pavement of mist,” but plant the foot there if so Christ bids, and He will show more, at length bringing him that obeys as far as He knows to the rock and the day. We are apt to confuse others’ tasks with ours. “Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it.”

III. WHAT FOLLOWS THIS OBEDIENCE.

1. It prevents hardness of heart. Young men and women with whom Jesus pleads, there are old men here who would tell you that once Christ’s voice was clear to them, but that now they catch but murmurs of a voice far off, and who would entreat you to respond to Him now. Hardness is the certain result of refusal.

2. It proves that we are Christ’s. What is Obedience

3. The way to success. You have heard it said that religious principles will not do for business. But can anything be more hopeless than to go against the God of Providence on whose side all things work. But let the text guide you in the office and the workshop, in public life and the social circle, and this will be the issue--judge if it be success or no! A peaceful conscience repose in the Divine care, unclouded fellowship with God, and at last, “Well done,” etc. (C. New.)

Perfect obedience

To obey God in some things of religion, and not in others, shows an unsound heart; like Esau, who obeyed his father in bringing him venison, but not in a greater matter, viz., the choice of his wife. Child-like obedience moves towards every command of God, as the needle points that way which the loadstone draws. (T. Watson.)

Obedience must be cheerful

A musician is not recommended for playing long but for playing well; it is obeying God willingly that is accepted; the Lord hates that which is forced, it is rather paying a tax than an offering. Good duties must not be pressed nor beaten out of us, as the waters came out of the rock when Moses smote it with his rod; but must freely drop from us as myrrh from the tree, or honey from the comb. If a willing mind be wanting, there wants that flower which should perfume our obedience, and make it a sweet smelling savour to God. (T. Watson.)

Submission without reasoning

Payson was asked, when under great bodily affliction, if he could see any particular reason for this dispensation. “No,” replied he, “but I am as well satisfied as if I could see ten thousand; God’s will is the very perfection of all reason.”

Implicit obedience

Manton says that, “John Cassian makes mention of one, who willingly fetched water near two miles every day for a whole year together, to pour it unto a dead dry stick, at the command of his superior, when no reason else could be given for it.” And of another it is recorded, that he professed that if he were enjoined by his superior to put to sea in a ship which had neither mast, tackling, nor any other furniture, he would do it; and when he was asked how he could do this without hazard of his discretion, he answered, “The wisdom must be in him that hath power to command, not in him that hath power to obey.” These are instances of implicit obedience to a poor fallible human authority, and are by no means to be imitated. But when it is God who gives the command, we cannot carry a blind obedience too far, since there can be no room for questioning the wisdom and goodness of any of His precepts. At Christ’s command it is wise to let down the net at the very spot where we have toiled in vain all the night. If God bids us, we can sweeten water with salt, and destroy poison with meat, yea, we may walk the waves of the sea, or the flames of a furnace. Well, said the Blessed Virgin, “Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it.” My heart, I charge thee follow thy Lord’s command without a moment’s question, though He bid thee go forward into the Red Sea, or onward into a howling wilderness. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

Obedience to Christ

I. THE RIGHT THAT MARY HAD TO SPEAK. The right of

1. Experience. Without this speech the history of Christ’s life would be sadly incomplete. Omit it, and what would our position be?

But we want to hear another voice, that of home. And here we have it from her whose lips kissed Him, whose hands caressed Him, who had Him under her eye from childhood to manhood, and her testimony is, “Whatsoever He saith,” etc.

2. Modesty: What gives point and force to her words is that she is no garrulous woman, making her son the subject of constant commendation. Only this once does she testify to Him. And there was a strong call in her to speak now. Up to this time Jesus had been a private man and had belonged to herself. But henceforth He was to be the public Messiah, and her Son no longer. Mary here renounces her exclusive right to Christ, and in parting from him says, “Whatsoever,” etc.

3. The tacit approval of Christ. Mothers are partial. Was, then, Mary’s love too strong for her judgment? The best answer is that Christ, who was least open to flattery, did not chide her: but afterwards, in laying down the terms of discipleship, used His mother’s words, “Ye are My friends if ye do whatsoever I command you.”

II. THE ADVICE THAT MARY GIVES.

1. It is not enough to have Christ’s words. The Bible as a mere possession is either neglected altogether or treated as a charm.

2. It is not enough to study Christ’s words, even with the closest attention and the firmest belief; although that is a blessed privilege.

3. The whole duty and creed of man is to do whatsoever Christ commands. To this we are pledged by the pattern prayer, and in this we have a supreme example in Christ Himself.

III. HOW ARE WE TO OBEY?

1. By loving Him.

2. By aiming at the perfection that is in Him. (P. Robertson.)

Obedience to Christ

I. THIS ADVICE MEETS A FELT WANT. There are times in life when we want the responsibility of decision divided--times of utter bafflement and perplexity. A friendly recommendation is sometimes helpful, but what is wanted is supreme dictation. Christ steps in here as the commander of the people and says, “Lo,” “Come,” “Do,” “Stand.”

II. THIS ADVICE WAS GIVEN BY CHRIST’S MOTHER, who had lived with Him a whole generation, and after all that experience felt warranted in offering it--the most magnificent tribute to Christ that was ever offered: that He was worthy of perfect obedience.

III. THIS ADVICE HE ENFORCES HIMSELF.

1. His commands are imperative and final. He never prefers a request or revises a decision.

2. His commands brook no emendation, diminution, or enlargement.

3. His commands require prompt and implicit obedience.

IV. THIS COMMANDMENT IS EXCEEDING BROAD.

1. Follow Me.

2. Love one another.

3. Wash ye one another’s feet.

4. Go ye into all the world.

5. Do this in remembrance of Me. (J. Parker, D. D.)

Instant obedience

The right path into the meaning of this saying is found in an interior view of the three states of mind represented in the little group.

1. That of Mary, who speaks.

2. Of the servants to whom she speaks.

3. And of the Saviour for whose decisive word she and they are waiting.

On the part of Mary there was evidently a mixture of perplexity, impatience, reverence, and trust. The impatience was sufficiently reproved and restrained. His “woman,” etc., dispelled her rising complacency, and placed her on that level of human dependence where, with all her loveliness, beauty, and sanctity, she must ever remain. Christ’s word was a call for increased faith. For thirty years Mary had carried in her soul the memory of the strange events which signalized His birth, etc. As yet He had given no supernatural sign. Was it not almost the “hour?” Just at this point of uncertainty she stood, but when she looked at Him all her doubts fled, and all fears sank to rest in one resolution of trusting obedience. “Whatsoever,” etc.

I. Whatsoever HE saith. One voice is singled out, and that has supreme authority. Some master every human being has. There are as many masters as there are interests, tastes, passions, etc. When we come to the moral life, men are at liberty to choose as they will. “Choose now this day,” etc. Choose Christ and live for ever, choose any other master and you will die. “No man can choose two masters.”

II. As there is but one voice of supreme authority, so THERE IS BUT ONE PRINCIPLE OF CHRISTIAN DUTY--instant, active obedience.

1. How many of the failures and miseries of life creep in between the hearing of God’s command and the doing of it. Men mistake speculative for practical truth; put matters of feeling in place of action. Some problem of Providence is conjured up as if a man had a right to keep his repentance and faith waiting till he can fathom it; some obscure dogma which should be left to clear itself is set up as a stumbling-block; moods of depression and discontent; conflicting claims of family or friends, or between action and contemplation. These must be cast off and left behind, not by thinking over them, or spasmodic efforts to manufacture feeling, but by a more prompt, unremitting doing of Christ’s will. Jesus saith “fill the water-pots,” etc. Our homely opportunities are our water-pots. Fill them with such water as you have. Whether the water shall be made wine is for Him to decide, not us. Be about the Master’s business. Go to the nearest duty.

2. Another kind of difficulty is cured by prompt obedience--indecision as to beginning to serve Christ. It is not till our part is done that the firkins are filled, that the supernatural energy will change the heart into the new creature. Believe: faith is the power: but the proof and fruit of faith is not separated from it--“Arise, and wash away thy sins;” bring forth fruit meet for repentance; bear witness to the Redeemer; have charity for one another.

III. ONE OTHER WORD COMPLETES THE SCOPE OF THE LESSON. “Whatsoever.”

1. What it should be, His mother and the servants did not know. It turned out no very difficult task, although it might have been. But it was a great trial of their faith. How was the water to remedy the want of wine? How are our prayers to move the Everlasting Arm? How shall bread and wine feed the heart, etc. And then there are other trials which need this bread “whatsoever” to cover them. When you begin to calculate the consequences of your obedience, when your flesh cries out that the sacrifice hurts

1. You will want this “whatsoever.”

2. What a holy power and beauty this obedience will yield in our dwellings. Draw out and bear to every guest in the Father’s house. Christ takes these old and common water-pots of our mortal relationships, our household affairs and every day dispositions and employments, and then, if only we are ready with our obedience, fills them with that new wine to which He so often compares His gift of life. (Bp. Huntington.)

Prompt obedience

A story is told of a great captain, who, after a battle, was talking over the events of the day with his officers. He asked them who had done the best that day. Some spoke of one man who had fought very bravely, and some of another. “No,” he said, “you are all mistaken. The best man in the field today was a soldier who was just lifting up his arm to strike an enemy, but, when he heard the trumpet sound a retreat, checked himself, dropped his arm and without striking the blow. That perfect and ready obedience to the will of his general is the noblest thing that has been done to-day.” (Pulpit Treasury.)

Christ’s orders

“Sir,” said the Duke of Wellington to an officer who urged the impossibility of executing the directions he had received, “I did not ask your opinion; I gave you my orders, and I expect to have them obeyed.” Such should be the obedience of every follower of Jesus Christ. The words which He hath spoken are our law, not our judgments or fancies. Even if death were in the way, it is “Not ours to reason why, ours but to do or die.” (Pulpit Treasury.)

A word for everybody

I. The UNIVERSALITY Of the command “whatsoever”

II. Its AUTHORITY, “He saith.” Who?

1. Our Creator.

2. Our Preserver.

3. Our Redeemer.

4. Our Master.

III. Its INDIVIDUALITY. “YOU.” Masters, servants; parents, children; ministers, hearers; the aged, the young; the man of many talents, the man of one; doctors, artists, poets, labourers.

IV. Its SPIRIT, “Do it “ thoroughly, cheerfully, at all times, everywhere. (Dr. Jarbo.)
“Ye are not your own,” etc.; therefore “Whatsoever He saith,” etc.

What does He say?

I. LABOUR NOT TO BE RICH (Proverbs 23:4-5; Pro_28:20; 1 Timothy 6:9-10). Yet the sin of the age is over anxiety to be rich. He saith by St. Colossians 3:2).

II. BE NOT CONFORMED TO THIS WORLD (2 Corinthians 6:17; Isaiah 52:11). What a falling off from this command there is in dress, amusement, etc.

III. GO WORK THIS DAY IN MY VINEYARD. There are so-called Christians who are quite satisfied if there are no great blots in their lives, without caring about the blanks; indeed their life may be called one great blank. Each one, however, is expected to cultivate his talent. To this end it is not necessary to be a minister. While there are young to teach, sick to visit, poor to be relieved, institutions to be supported, Christ to witness, no special vocation is required.

IV. LOVE AS BRETHREN. “By this shall all men know,” etc. (John 17:20-21). And yet see how the different regiments of the Christian army, instead of fighting against the common foe, are turned against each other, and the world says deridingly, “Settle it first among yourselves, and then we will listen to your claims.” We are not likely to see eye to eye on all subjects; let us therefore be tolerant of each another’s opinions and feelings.

V. HITHERTO YE HAVE ASKED NOTHING IN MY NAME. ASK AND YE SHALL RECEIVE. How remiss we are in the duty of prayer, public, social, private, family. Philippians 4:8. (Dr. Jarbo.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 2:5". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-2.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.

This verse shows several things: (1) Mary did not understand Jesus' words either as a rebuke or as a refusal to meet the need pointed out by her; (2) she evidently anticipated that Jesus' command might appear unreasonable to the servants; and (3) under normal circumstances, servants might hesitate to carry out the orders of a guest. Thus, her remarks to the servants were needed and timely. That she was in a position to instruct the servants suggests a close personal connection with the family of the bridegroom, and indicating also that Mary, not Nathaniel, might have been the source of the invitation to Jesus and his disciples.

Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it ... Mary thus assumed her proper place, no longer making suggestions to the Lord, but leaving everything in his hands. These words are timeless in their application. Whatever Christ commands should be obediently accepted and done. The advice of the blessed Mary to the servants of Cana is appropriate for every generation; and even churches should spare themselves the burden of deciding which of the Lord's commandments are essential or not and do them all.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

His mother said unto the servants,.... She took the reproof in good part, and by the words he said, and the manner in which he spoke them, or by the looks he gave, and the gestures he might use, she hoped, and even believed, that the thing she moved for would be done; and therefore went immediately to the servants, and gave them the following instructions:

whatsoever he saith unto you, do it; punctually observe and obey his orders in every circumstance.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 2:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-2.html. 1999.

People's New Testament

Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it. She evidently understood from the manner, if not the words, of his reply that he would relieve the difficulty.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 2:5". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-2.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Unto the servants (τοις διακονοιςtois diakonois). See note on Matthew 20:26 for this word (our “deacon,” but not that sense here).

Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it (οτι αν λεγηι υμιν ποιησατεHoti an legēi humin poiēsate). Indefinite relative sentence (οτι ανhoti an and present active subjunctive, general statement) with aorist active imperative of ποιεωpoieō for instant execution. Mary took comfort in the “not yet” (ουπωoupō) and recognized the right of Jesus as Messiah to independence of her, but evidently expected him to carry out her suggestion ultimately as he did. This mother knew her Son.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-2.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Unto the servants ( διακόνοις )

See on Matthew 20:26; see on Mark 9:35.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-2.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.

His mother saith to the servants — Gathering from his answer he was about to do something extraordinary.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 2:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-2.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

His mother saith unto the servants1, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it2.

  1. His mother saith unto the servants. Though he had spoken words of rebuke, his mother was neither offended nor discouraged because of them,

  2. Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it. Though her words are not addressed to us, they will prove of untold profit to us if we obey them.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 2:5". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-2.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Whatsoever, &c. The mother of Jesus appears to have been in expectation of some extraordinary interposition from her Son on this occasion; but what were the particular grounds of this expectation does not appear, for no previous instance of the exercise of his miraculous powers had occurred.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-2.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Матерь Его сказала служителям. Здесь святая дева показывает пример истинного послушания, которое подобает оказывать ее Сыну. В нем речь идет не только о человеческом долге, но и о божественной силе. Итак, она смиренно удовлетворилась ответом Христовым и призвала других повиноваться Его повелениям. Признаю, что святая дева говорила так исходя из сложившихся обстоятельств. Она как бы отказывала себе в каком-либо праве вмешиваться в это дело. Они как бы говорила: Христос сделает лишь то, что захочет Сам. Однако, если принять во внимание цель ее слов, смысл прояснится еще больше. Вначале она отрекается от той власти, которую, как казалось, несправедливо себе присвоила, затем она приписывает всю власть Христу, повелевая исполнить все Его предписания. Итак, здесь мы научаемся следующему: испрашивая что-либо у Христа, мы только тогда получим просимое, если будем полностью зависеть от Него, взирать на Него, и делать все, что Он повелевает. Христос не отсылает нас к матери, но скорее приглашает к Самому Себе.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-2.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 5. "His mother says to the servants, Whatsoever he says to you, "do it." Something in the tone and expression of Jesus gives Mary to understand that this refusal leaves a place for a more moderate granting of the desire. Perhaps in this narrative, which is so summary, there is here the omission of a circumstance which the reader may supply for himself from what follows (precisely like that which occurs in John 11:28), a circumstance which gives occasion to the charge of Mary to the servants: "Do whatsoever He shall tell you."

How, at this moment of heavenly joy, when Jesus was receiving His Spouse from the hands of His Father, could He have altogether refused the prayer of her who, during thirty years, had been taking the most tender care of Him, and from whom He was about to separate Himself forever? Jesus, without having need of any other sign of His Father"s will, grants to the faith of His mother a hearing analogous to that which, at a later time, He did not refuse to a stranger, a Gentile (Matthew 15:25). If criticism has found in the obscurities of this dialogue an evidence against the truth of the account, it is an ill-drawn conclusion. This unique conciseness is, on the contrary, the seal of its authenticity.—By the expression:Whatsoever He says to you, Mary reserves full liberty of action to her Son, and thus enters again within her own bounds, which she had tried to overstep.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-2.html.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

KNOWLEDGE FROM OBEDIENCE

‘Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it.’

John 2:5

Mary, the mother of our Lord, speaks only on three occasions (in the sacred records), and those three utterances of hers are like three clear notes of a bell—of metal sound, and rich. ‘Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it.’ Here her words reveal the disciple’s perfect loyalty.

I. Mary struck there the note of all the best Christian experience that has come down through all the ages since. How familiar has become the simple attitude of the puzzled soul which cries: ‘Lord, reveal Thyself in dealing with me; I will not hinder Thee; I will obey Thee. Whatsoever Thou sayest unto me, I will do it.’ In submissive acceptance of God’s Will we shall understand that which no mere study of His words could teach us. But yet the words of Mary here do not allow us to forget that all true waiting for Christ’s self-revelation is of an active and not merely of a passive sort. ‘Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it.’

II. There is something to be done, in order that Jesus may show out completely what He is trying to make manifest.—(This is His will in His dealings with us.) And acts become little or great only according to the degree in which God manifests Himself and works through them. It was not because she knew that they would have wine or something better, it was because her Son would surely show Himself through their obedience, if they obeyed, that Mary cared what these servants did. Our Lord, then, will not perfectly reveal Himself except in His action on and through obedient men.

III. But another question comes.—‘Intelligence comes by obedience; but can I obey Him till I first know what He has to say? Can I admit the right of another to bid me obey?’ Now here it is necessary to distinguish clearly between ‘faith’ and ‘sight.’ Faith is the knowledge of a person; sight is the perception of a thing. To believe any one on faith is to believe it because that person is trustworthy. To believe anything on sight is to believe it because we ourselves perceive it to be true. We see then what a perfect right one has—one who knows Christ by a true experience, as Mary here—to bid others obey Him, even though they know not what orders He may give.

But it is not often that a man who seriously desires to know His Will can be in doubt about it. If Jesus were at hand, you would go out and ask Him: ‘Is it Thy Will, O Lord, that I should do this or that?’ Can you not ask Him now? Is that act right? Would He do it? Would He have it done? Will it help my soul? If the answer to these and such like questions is ‘Yes,’ and if the heart and conscience be clearly convinced, it is His bidding; it is His command as clearly as if His gracious Form stood visibly before you, and His Finger pointed to the task; and when, perhaps, the act is of itself obviously right, it is more than ever His command, just because it is the reassertion, the enforcement of essential duty. He does not make righteousness; He reveals it; and when the loving soul obeys it is conscious that it is doing at His command what it was bound to do.

Bishop Phillips Brooks.

Illustration

‘We live before the open eye of God, we die at the beckoning of His hand, and our conscience will tell us whether we fail or whether we succeed. I could take you to some little homes where the great men of the world would write failure over the cottage door, but the Judge Supreme would write success. Why? Because that little life has been lived in faith—not any great financial success, not any great climbing up the ladder of human fame. No K.C.B. has been written after that Christian name, but the word ‘Faithful unto death’ is written in the Book of Heaven about that life, and that is success—Faithful unto death.’

(SECOND OUTLINE)

WHATSOEVER

That word ‘whatsoever’ lies very near the heart of Christianity.

I. There is the whatsoever of promise.—‘Whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive.’

II. There is the whatsoever of single-mindedness and self-forgetfulness.—‘Whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God.’

III. There is the whatsoever of holy contentment.—‘I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.

IV. There is the whatsoever of earnestness.—‘Whatsoever ye do, do it heartily.’ Or ‘do it from the very soul,’ as we might translate the Apostle’s phrase.

V. There is the whatsoever of brotherliness.—‘Whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye so to them.’

VI. There is the whatsoever of obedience.—‘Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it.’ Christ Himself is the centre of our loyalty; for Christ ‘is the Head of the Church.’ How complete an example of obedience is wrapped up in that title! My head issues its commands to every member of my body. In obedience to its authority my hands work, my feet walk, my tongue speaks, and even my ears listen. There is no mutiny among the members of my body, unless they are injured or diseased, against the commands of my head. Their response to its authority is willing and immediate. Even so should it be between Christ and His Church: ‘Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it.’

Illustration

‘Christ only changed the water into wine when the pots had been filled to the very brim, and He has only promised to bless us “in due season, if we faint not.” Missionaries worked for twelve years in Sierra Leone without seeing any results, but in the thirteenth year they had filled their waterpots up to the brim, and the Lord began to give His blessing. In New Zealand, Samuel Marsden worked for nine years without a single convert, but at the end of that time he had filled his waterpot, and the ingathering of souls commenced. Are you halting to-day in your obedience? You may be halting on the very threshold of success. Your waterpot may be nearly full. Another effort and the command may be changed; the Master will no longer say, “Fill the waterpots,” but “Draw out now.” And your water of service will be transmuted into the wine of blessing.’

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 2:5". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-2.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

5 His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.

Ver. 5. His mother saith to the servants] Not a word to her Son, though he had publicly reproved her. "Once I have spoken, but I will not answer," saith Job, Job 40:5. Jonah, reprehended by God, shuts up his prophecy in silence, in token of his true repentance. David was dumb because it was God’s doing, Psalms 39:9. Bring God into the heart, and all will be hushed.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 2:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-2.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 2:5

We must perceive at once the peculiar appropriateness with which this miracle was chosen as the first to be performed by our Lord, when we bear in mind that the great object of our Lord's incarnation was to reunite, in ties compared to the bonds of marriage, the human nature with the Divine.

I. It was a festal occasion, and how could our gracious Lord but rejoice at the commencement of that stupendous work of Divine mercy which, determined upon before the world began, by the kindness of God the blessed Trinity, He had now come to effect? Yet whilst the Lord Jesus cheered His heart at the commencement of His ministry by adorning the marriage feast with His presence, and so contemplating His own union with His spouse, the Church, there is melancholy in these words, "Mine hour is not yet come," which speaks to the heart of every one who truly weighs their meaning.

II. "Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it." This is our exhortation. Be in the way of duty, and God will be with you. And herein how blessed and how wonderful is the example set us by our Lord Himself! The greatest miracle, as an old writer has observed, is that Christ should have been for thirty years on earth and yet have worked no miracle till now. For thirty years He did not manifest His powers even to His kinsmen; for thirty years He pursued a carpenter's trade in a remote town of Galilee, obscure, despised. For almost His whole life His was a career of obscurity such as the ambitious must despise. His was a life of inactivity such as the active, the zealous, the busybodies must consider useless. His was a life most certainly which no son of man so endowed (looking merely to endowments of our Lord's human nature) could have led without the special and restraining grace of God. Thus Christ teaches us that our perfection and true greatness consist, in the eyes of angels and of those just men made perfect who form the Church invisible and triumphant, in doing God's will, whatever that will may be, in that situation in which He sees fit, by the ordinance of His Providence, to place us.

W. F. Hook, Sermons on the Miracles, vol. i., p. 1.


References: John 2:5.—Parker, Christian World Pulpit, vol. vii., p. 1; Preacher's Monthly, vol. vii., p. 28. John 2:7.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxvi., No. 1556. John 2:9, John 2:10.—Ibid., vol. v., Nos. 225, 226. John 2:10.—Christian World Pulpit, vol. iii., p. 24; J. Keble, Sermons for Christmas and Epiphany, pp. 421, 441; Homilist, vol. vi., p. 345.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-2.html.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

5.] There certainly seems beneath this narrative to lie some incident which is not told us. For not only is Mary not repelled by the answer just given, but she is convinced that the miracle will be wrought, and she is not without an anticipation of the method of working it: for how should He require the aid of the servants, except the miracle were to take place according to the form here related? I believe we shall find, when all things are opened to us, that there had been a previous hint given her,—where or how I would not presume to say,—by our Lord, of His intention and the manner of performing it, and that her fault was, the too rash hastening on of what had been His fixed purpose.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 2:5". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-2.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 2:5. The words of Jesus last spoken implied that He intended to help, though not immediately. Hence Mary’s direction to the servants, whose service she supposed Jesus would require (perhaps to go and fetch wine). Any allusion to Genesis 41:55 (Hengstenberg) is remote from the text. Ebrard finds it implied in the passage, that Jesus, after He had spoken, John 2:4, rose and turned towards the servants.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 2:5". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-2.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 2:5. λέγει, she saith) Mary had not yet seen a miracle performed by Jesus: John 2:11 [proves this]; but from His own reply she wisely inferred, that one was about to be performed.— , τι ἂν λέγῃ ὑμῖν, ποιήσατε, whatsoever He shall have said unto you, do it) She feels that He is about to do something; therefore she delegates the whole management, resting on herself, as well as the servants themselves, to Him. Comp. Genesis 41:55, ἐὰν εἴτῃ ὑμῖν, ποιήσατε, whatever He shall have said to you, do ye [Pharaoh’s direction that the Egyptians should go to Joseph].

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 2:5". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-2.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

She plainly by these words declareth her confidence that Christ (notwithstanding the repulse he gave her) would supply this want; and therefore taking no notice of Christ’s reprehension of her, she orders the servants to be absolutely obedient to him, doing, without disputing, whatsoever he bid them; and indeed such is the obedience which we all owe to God and Jesus Christ.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 2:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-2.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5.Mother saith unto the servants—However obscure to commentators, the words of Jesus were clear to Mary. She understands, first, that she is properly excluded from all control over her son’s miraculous functions; second, that it is by miracle that he assumes that he is requested by her to supply the deficit of wine; and, third, (probably from his significant word yet,) that the miracle may still be performed. That rests supremely with her son and Lord.

Whatsoever he saith—These words perfectly surrender the matter to him, with blended submission and faith; which probably hastened the arrival, or at least fulness of the HOUR, and completed the possibility of the miracle.

Do it—She speaks as having authority here; and she speaks to subordinate that authority to him.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-2.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘His mother says to the servants, “Whatever he says to you, do it.’

Mary clearly did not feel His words as a rebuke, but just as a reminder that she must not hurry Him into His work. But she knows Him well enough to know that He will do something, something which is apparent to her from His attitude. So she turns round and tells the waiting servers, (possibly unpaid volunteers), ‘Do whatever He tells you.’ The words may indicate that she is expecting Him to do something unusual which may take the servers by surprise, or may simply indicate her confidence in His ability to get the people out of the mess that they had got themselves into.

This incident illustrates the fact that, although like the disciples she accepts He is chosen for a special task, Mary is not fully in tune with her son’s purposes. Jesus will later re-emphasise this when He will not allow her to interfere with His ministry in other circumstances (Mark 3:31-35), putting her on a par, from that point of view, with all who do the will of God. Even His mother cannot be allowed to interfere in His destiny. She now has no special influence over Him.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-2.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Mary accepted Jesus" statement humbly and did not nag Him. She did, however, urge the servants to cooperate with Him if He acted. She did not understand what He would do or when, but she had confidence in His compassion and ability. She demonstrated admirable submission and faith toward Jesus. She allowed Jesus to take charge and solve the problem, and she pointed others to Jesus, not to herself. Previously she had approached Jesus as His mother and had received a mild rebuke. Now she approached Him as her Lord and shortly received satisfaction (cf. Matthew 15:21-28). In this she provides an excellent example for us.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-2.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 2:5. His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it. The answer of Jesus (John 2:4) plainly implied that His hour would come. Mary, therefore, turns to the servants, and bids them be ready. The words are indefinite, and we have no right to suppose either that she now looked for miraculous help, or that she had received some private intimation of her Son’s purpose. She waits for the ‘hour:’ whatsoever the hour may bring, let the servants be prepared to do His bidding. Mary here retires from the scene.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-2.html. 1879-90.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

John 2:5. His mother — Either gathering from his answer, or from something he said to her which the evangelists have not recorded, that he would perform something extraordinary; saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it — Obey his orders immediately and exactly, for he may have reasons for them beyond what you imagine. Hereby she declares her expectation of his performing some mighty work, in answer to what she had suggested to him; and prescribes a rule, which it would be well if every servant of Christ would invariably observe, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it, not questioning the reasonableness of the command, or its fitness to accomplish the end proposed, but implicitly obeying whatever is manifestly a precept of Christ.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on John 2:5". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/john-2.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

servants = free servants. Greek. diakonos. Compare Matthew 20:26. Mark 9:35.

Whatsoever, &c. Mary"s last-recorded words.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 2:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.

His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-2.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

5. Do whatever he tells you. She seems to understand that he will do something about the shortage of wine.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 2:5". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-2.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) Whatsoever he saith unto you.—His answer has not repelled her. She still believes and expects. Her command to the servants confirms the opinion that the marriage is of some member of the family. This opinion has taken strange traditional forms; one being that here, too, the Evangelist casts a veil over an incident in his own life, and that he was himself the bridegroom; but that, guided by the miracle, he from that moment left all and followed Christ. The Prologue to St. John attributed to Jerome says that “John, wishing to marry, was called from the wedding by our Lord” (Trench On Miracles, p. 98). See Matthew 19:29 et seq., and Luke 14:26.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.
Whatsoever
15:14; Genesis 6:22; Judges 13:14; Luke 5:5,6; 6:46-49; Acts 9:6; Hebrews 5:9; 11:8
Reciprocal: Genesis 7:5 - all that;  Genesis 42:20 - And they;  Exodus 4:4 - And he put;  Exodus 12:50 - as the Lord;  Exodus 17:10 - Joshua;  Joshua 2:21 - And she bound;  Joshua 6:12 - the priests;  Judges 6:27 - and did;  Ruth 3:6 - and did;  2 Kings 5:14 - according to;  2 Kings 13:17 - Open;  1 Chronicles 14:16 - did as God;  1 Chronicles 21:19 - went up;  Job 42:9 - did;  Jeremiah 13:5 - as;  Ezekiel 12:7 - I did so;  Ezekiel 37:4 - Prophesy;  Matthew 1:24 - did;  Matthew 21:2 - GeneralMatthew 26:19 - the disciples;  Mark 8:6 - to sit;  Mark 11:4 - and found;  Mark 14:13 - Go;  Luke 17:14 - as;  Luke 22:13 - GeneralJohn 2:7 - Fill;  John 21:6 - They cast;  Acts 8:27 - he arose;  Acts 12:9 - he went;  Philippians 4:9 - do

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 2:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-2.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 5. "His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it."

Mary understands the answer of Jesus correctly thus, that He only opposes her interference, but will do what she desires. Now that she is certain of His willingness, she has no doubt of His power. The word which she speaks to the servants, "Whatsoever He saith unto you, do it," is a word of unconditional faith. It seems that Mary, in this saying, alludes to Genesis 41:55 : "And when all the land of Egypt was famished, the people cried to Pharaoh for bread: and Pharaoh said unto all the Egyptians, Go unto Joseph; what he saith unto you, do." LXX. ὃ ἐὰν εἴπῃ ὑμῖν, ποιήσατε. The resemblance is hardly a chance one, as the situation corresponds to the agreement of the words.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 2:5". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-2.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

5.His mother saith to the servants. Here the holy Virgin gives an instance of true obedience which she owed to her Son, (47) when the question related, not to the relative duties of mankind, but to his divine power. She modestly acquiesces, therefore, in Christ’s reply; and in like manner exhorts others to comply with his injunctions. I acknowledge, indeed, that what the Virgin now said related to the present occurrence, and amounted to a declaration that, in this instance, she had no authority, and that Christ would do, according to his own pleasure, whatever he thought right. But if you attend closely to her design, the statement which she made is still more extensive; for she first disclaims and lays aside the power which she might seem to have improperly usurped; and next, she ascribes the whole authority to Christ, when she bids themdo whatever he shall command. We are taught generally by these words, that if we desire any thing from Christ, we will not obtain our wishes, unless we depend on him alone, look to him, and, in short, do whatever he commands On the other hand, he does not send us to his mother, but rather invites us to himself.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 2:5". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-2.html. 1840-57.