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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 20:11

But Mary was standing outside the tomb weeping; and so, as she wept, she stooped and looked into the tomb;

Adam Clarke Commentary

But Mary stood without - She remained some time after Peter and John had returned to their own homes.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 20:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-20.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

But Mary was standing without at the tomb weeping: so as she wept, she stooped and looked into the tomb.

Mary did not leave the tomb, as did Peter and John, but remained there to weep. It is not known if she was alone, or what time of day this occurred. It is received in faith and reverence, as from the eyewitness account of an apostle, and with full consciousness that the revelation we have received, though inspired: is nonetheless fragmentary, but fragmentary only as regards inconsequential details. Of the great central facts, there is an overwhelming profusion of faith-inducing information.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-20.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But Mary stood without at the sepulchre,.... She returned from the city to the sepulchre again, following Peter and John thither, who continued here when they departed, being willing to get some tidings of her Lord, if possible. The word "without", is omitted by the Syriac, Arabic, and Persic versions, but is in the Greek copies; and is properly put by the evangelist, when rightly understood; for the meaning is not, that she stood without the sepulchre, taken in its full extent; for she stood, בחצר, "in the court", where the bearers set down the corpse, in order to carry it into the cave, or vault; she stood without the innermost part of the sepulchre, but not without side the sepulchre itself; as appears from her stooping and looking into it:

weeping; that the body of her dear Lord was taken away, and she was prevented of showing that respect unto it she designed; and not knowing in whose hands it was, but fearing it would be insulted and abused by wicked men, her heart was ready to break with sorrow:

and as she wept, she stooped down and looked into the sepulchre; to see if she could see him, if she and the disciples were not mistaken, being loath to go without finding him: so it is in a spiritual sense, the absence of Christ is cause of great distress and sorrow to gracious souls; because of the excellency of his person, the near and dear relations he stands in to them and on account of the nature of his presence and company, which is preferable to everything in this world; nor can such souls, when they have lost sight of Christ, sit down contented; but will seek after him in the Scriptures, under the ministry of the word, and at the ordinances of the Gospel, where a crucified, buried, risen Jesus is exhibited.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 20:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-20.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

But Mary stood a without at the sepulchre weeping: and as she wept, she stooped down, [and looked] into the sepulchre,

(a) That is, outside of the cave which the sepulchre was cut out of.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 20:11". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-20.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Was standing (ιστηκειhistēkei). Past perfect of ιστημιhistēmi as imperfect as in John 19:25.

At the tomb (προς τωι μνημειωιpros tōi mnēmeiōi). ΠροςPros (in front of) with locative while παραpara (by the side of) with locative in John 19:25. Pathetic and common picture of a woman weeping by the tomb. See John 11:31.

As she wept
(ως εκλαιενhōs eklaien). Imperfect, “as she was weeping.”

She stooped and looked
(παρεκυπσενparekupsen). Aorist active indicative of παρακυπτωparakuptō for which see John 20:5. Mary “peeped into” the tomb, but did not enter.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-20.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Stood

Imperfect, was standing, or continued standing, after the two apostles had gone away.


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The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-20.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

But Mary stood without at the sepulchre weeping: and as she wept, she stooped down, and looked into the sepulchre,

But Mary stood — With more constancy. Mark 16:9.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 20:11". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-20.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

But Mary was standing without at the tomb weeping1: so, as she wept, she stooped and looked into the tomb2;
    FIRST AND SECOND APPEARANCES OF THE RISEN CHRIST. THE RESURRECTION REPORTED TO THE APOSTLES. (Jerusalem. Sunday morning.) Matthew 28:9,10; Mark 16:9-11; Luke 24:9-11; John 20:11-18

  1. But Mary was standing without at the tomb weeping. This picture is intensely natural. The Lord's death had been sorrow enough, but to be deprived of the poor privilege of embalming the body seemed a veritable sorrow's crown of sorrow; and so Mary wept.

  2. So, as she wept, she stooped and looked into the tomb. But it suddenly occurs to her that in her haste she had not yet looked into the tomb at all, having jumped to the conclusion that it was empty because she saw it open; she therefore looks in.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 20:11". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-20.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

11.But Mary stood at the sepulcher without. The Evangelist now begins to describe the manner in which Christ appeared both to the women and to the disciples, to testify his resurrection. Though he mentions but one woman, Mary, yet I think it is probable that the other women were also along with her; for it is not reasonable to suppose, as some have done, that the women fainted through fear. Those writers wish to avoid a contradiction, but I have already shown that no such contradiction exists.

As to the women remaining at the sepulchre, while the disciples return to the city, they are not entitled to great accommodation on this account; for the disciples carry with them consolation and joy, but the women torment themselves by idle and useless weeping. In short, it is superstition alone, accompanied by carnal feelings, that keeps them near the sepulchre


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-20.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

WHAT MARY SAW THROUGH HER TEARS

‘But Mary stood without at the sepulchre weeping.’

John 20:11

Here is the lone figure of Mary Magdalene weeping before the tomb in the early dawn of the first Easter Day. Let us think of what Mary saw through her tears.

I. She saw the stone rolled away.—Matthew says ‘the angel of the Lord descended from heaven, and came and rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it.’ A grave-stone a seat for an angel. What a triumph!

II. She saw the empty grave.—The grave-clothes were there, the sweet scent of the spices clings around the rock-hewn tomb, but Jesus was not there. The Resurrection was entirely unexpected. Mary expected to find the Body, for she brought spices to complete the embalmment. St. Peter and John are equally surprised (John 20:9). Yes, the grave was empty, except that the sins of all believers were buried in that grave.

III. She saw the ministering angels.

IV. She saw the Living Lord.—‘The Lord is risen indeed.’ ‘“Risen”—that one word, if we hold it fast, changes all things, conquers death, dries tears, calms grief, widens our outlook, and makes earth the nursery and heaven home.’ The Risen Christ is our Hope and Salvation, and is the one Divine answer to all our sorrows and questionings. Wonderful things are seen through tears, and seen no other way. The way to the Cross is wet with tears. The way to the grave is wet with tears. The most blessed things of our lives come through tears. May we learn to pray those lovely lines of Hartley Coleridge—

‘I am a sinner, full of doubts and fears,

Make me a humble thing of love and tears.’

Then ‘the raindrops of grief will become rainbows of joy.’ Other times for other things, but Easter for joy.

—Rev. F. Harper.

Illustration

‘It is scarcely too much to say of this narrative that it needs no other evidence of its truth than its own beauty and suggestiveness. If this and the other accounts in these two last chapters of the Fourth Gospel are not descriptive of historical events, where in the imaginative literature of the world are their parallels to be found? As we master them in detail we feel that they could never have sprung from invention or misunderstanding. “If”—says a modern preacher—“it is not history, I would match the story of Mary Magdalene and the Lord on the Resurrection morning, for subtlety of characterisation, for exquisite beauty, for reticence, for simplicity that goes straight to the heart, against anything that a Shakespeare or a Dante ever wrote.”’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 20:11". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-20.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

11 But Mary stood without at the sepulchre weeping: and as she wept, she stooped down, and looked into the sepulchre,

Ver. 11. Mary stood at the sepulchre, weeping] Some think it was because she conceived that the Jews had gotten away our Saviour’s dead body to dishonour it; as the Popish persecutors digged up Bucer’s and many other good men’s bones to burn them. She wept where she had no such cause; so do too many, women especially, who should do well to keep their tears for better uses, and not wash foul rooms with sweet waters. Needless tears must be unwept again.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 20:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-20.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

11.] She had come with them, but more slowly. εἱστήκει, was standing, strictly imperfect: not ‘had been standing.’


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 20:11". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-20.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 20:11. εἱστήκει, had stood) with greater perseverance.— πρὸς τῷ) The Dative: John 20:12, “At the ( πρὸς τῇ) head—at the ( πρὸς τοῖς) feet”— ἔξω, without) This denotes her deep feeling of affectionate piety; for usually persons weeping avail themselves of solitude, when they can.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 20:11". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-20.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

That the Mary here mentioned was Mary Magdalene appeareth from John 20:14, compared with Mark 16:9, which saith, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 20:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-20.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

We are often distressed and weep at that which springs from and is the manifestation of infinite love, and which will best promote the glory of God and the everlasting good of men.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-20.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

11. ΄αρία δἑ. She had returned to the sepulchre after the hurrying Apostles. Mark 16:9 states definitely, what we gather from this section, that the risen Lord’s first appearance was to Mary Magdalene: the details of the meeting are given by S. John alone. She continued standing (John 18:5; John 18:16; John 18:18, John 19:25) after the other two had gone.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on John 20:11". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/john-20.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

§ 148.JESUS APPEARS FIRST TO MARY MAGDALENE, John 20:11-18.

11. Mary stood without—While Mary has gone to the two chief disciples, the other women have come to the sepulchre, seen the angels, and gone on their message to the other apostles. Mary follows the two runners to the sepulchre, and while they go in she stands without weeping.

As she wept Half uncovering her face and momentarily looking in.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-20.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Apparently Mary Magdalene had returned to the empty tomb after she had informed Peter and John about it. Perhaps she returned with them. The other women had evidently left by then. John presented her as lingering there after Peter and John departed. She was still grieving over the death and now the missing body of Jesus. She had not yet realized what John did. She then peered into the tomb for the second time (cf. Mark 16:5).

"I recall Proverbs 8:17 -"I love them that love Me; and those that seek Me early shall find Me.... Another verse comes to mind- Psalm 30:5, "Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning."" [Note: Ibid, 1:389.]


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-20.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 20:11. But Mary stood without at the sepulchre weeping. Peter and John had returned to their homes. Mary had followed them when they first ran to the sepulchre; but (probably in consequence of their eager haste) she had not reached it before they departed. Nothing at least is said of her having met them and been addressed by them. She stands there with no thought of a resurrection in her mind, but believing only that the body has been taken away, and therefore weeping with loud lamentation (comp. on chap. John 11:34-35).

As she wept therefore she stooped down, and looked into the sepulchre. Nothing could be more natural than that she should desire to view the spot associated with all that was so dear to her.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-20.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 20:11. ΄αρία δὲ εἱστήκειἔξω. Hitherto John has told us simply what he himself saw: now he reports what Mary told him, see John 20:18. She had come to the tomb after the men, but could not share in their belief. She remained outside the tomb helplessly and hopelessly weeping. She herself had told the disciples that the tomb was empty, and she had seen them come out of it; but again παρέκυψεν εἰς τὸ μνημεῖον “she peered into the tomb”; an inimitably natural touch. She could not believe her Lord was gone. καὶ θεωρεῖἰησοῦ. This, says Holtzmann, is a mere reminiscence of Luke 24:4. But even the description of the angels differs. They were “seated one at the head and one at the feet where the body of Jesus lay”; sitting, says Bengel, “quasi opera quapiam perfunctos, et exspectantes aliquem, quem docerent”. Lampe has little help to give here; and Lücke is justified in saying that neither the believing nor the critical inquirer can lift the veil that hangs over this appearance of angels. In Mary’s case it was wholly without result; for no sooner does she answer the angels’ question than she turns away, probably hearing a footstep behind her.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 20:11". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-20.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

at. Greek. pros. App-104.

weeping. Greek. klaio. See on John 11:33.

and = therefore.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 20:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But Mary stood without at the sepulchre weeping: and as she wept, she stooped down, and looked into the sepulchre,

But Mary stood without at the sepulchre weeping. Brief had been the stay of Peter and John. But Mary, who may have taken another way to the sepulchre after they left it, lingers at the spot, weeping for her missing Lord.

And as she wept, she stooped down, and looked - through her tears, "into the sepulchre,"


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-20.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) But Mary stood (better, was standing) without at the sepulchre weeping.—She had before gone back as soon as she saw that the stone was taken away (John 20:1-2), and had told the two disciples of what she found. She was left behind by them in their haste to reach the sepulchre, but has followed them, and now that they have returned with the joy of a new and fuller faith, she remains without the sepulchre, not venturing to enter, and giving vent in tears to the sorrow that weighs upon her heart.

She stooped down, and looked into the sepulchre.—Comp. Note on John 20:5.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 20:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-20.html. 1905.

Ver. 11. "But Mary stood without at the sepulchre weeping: and, as she wept, she stooped down, and looked into the sepulchre."

The disciples had run to the grave: Mary Magdalene came more slowly. She remains there, after the disciples had gone away: they went away so soon, doubtless because it was their task to carry intelligence to their fellow-Apostles, and with them to wait for that manifestation of the risen Lord which had been promised to the whole apostolical circle. Peter and John had both received a joyful influence from the sepulchre: Peter marvelled, John believed. Mary, on the contrary, weeps, notwithstanding that the Apostles had communicated their impressions to her. The result of the whole gave no satisfaction to her. The reason of this could be only that she had earlier been more favoured; and had expected, therefore, that the Apostles would have been more favoured also. She had seen, in company with the other women, a vision of angels who announced Christ's resurrection; on the way home she had seen the Lord Himself, although only in a transitory way. Now she has nothing but the empty grave, before which she indulges in sorrow, especially as the Apostles had seen nothing more. She is thrown into doubt as to her earlier experience, and this doubt breaks her heart. Her weeping for Jesus, however, is heard: first the angels become visible to her again, and then Jesus Himself appears to her.


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Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 20:11". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-20.html.


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Tuesday, September 18th, 2018
the Week of Proper 19 / Ordinary 24
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