Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 20:6

And so Simon Peter also *came, following him, and entered the tomb; and he *saw the linen wrappings lying there,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   John;   Love;   Peter;   Thompson Chain Reference - Dead, the;   Mortality-Immortality;   Resurrection;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - John the apostle;   Mary;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Burial;   Grave;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Peter;   Resurrection of Christ;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - John the Apostle;   John, the Gospel According to;   Lazarus;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Death, Second;   Hour;   John;   John, the Gospel of;   Mary;   Tomb of Jesus;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - John, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Cave ;   Dress (2);   Peter;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Grave;   Mary Magdalene ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Smith Bible Dictionary - John the Apostle;   John, Gospel of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Peter, Simon;   Resurrection of Jesus Christ, the;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for October 20;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Seeth the linen clothes lie - Θεωπει : from θεαομαι, to behold, and ὁραω, to see - to look steadily at any thing, so as to discover what it is, and to be satisfied with viewing it.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 20:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-20.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Simon Peter therefore also cometh, following him, and entered into the tomb; and he beholdeth the linen cloths lying.

Commentators who refer this to some mere tidying up of the grave, or the folding of the garments (there were no garments; but medical bandages), miss the point. Since when has it ever been supposed that a folded garment, or cloth, proved that the dead had arisen? The certain implication of this astounding narration is that Jesus had risen through the winding shroud of bandages, napkin and all, leaving behind the positive and undeniable evidence of his supernatural triumph over death. Remember, this evidence convinced John. The very amount of space accorded this phenomenon in this Gospel is far more than enough to indicate the extraordinary implications of "the linen cloths lying." Matthew has a remarkable corroboration of this account in the words of the angel, "Come see the place where the Lord lay" (Matthew 26:6), thus emphatically implying all that John here related.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 20:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-20.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then cometh Simon Peter following him,.... In a very little time after him:

and went into the sepulchre; itself, though not without first stooping down, as John did; see Luke 24:12.

And seeth the linen clothes lie; as John did; and as by the mouth of two or three witnesses everything is confirmed, so was this; both saw the linen in which the body was wrapped, but that was gone; and which was a sign that the body was not stolen away, otherwise the linen would not have been left; and besides, it would have taken up some time, and given a good deal of trouble, to have unwrapped the body, when it is considered how many foldings the Jews used to wind up their corpse in.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 20:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-20.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Entered and beholdeth (εισηλτεν και τεωρειeisēlthen kai theōrei). Aorist active and present active indicative. Peter impulsively went on in and beholds (τεωρειtheōrei vivid term again, but of careful notice, τεωρεωtheōreō not a mere glance βλεπωblepō such as John gave in John 20:5).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 20:6". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-20.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie,

Peter seeth the linen clothes lie — and the napkin folded up - The angels who ministered to him when he rose, undoubtedly folded up the napkin and linen clothes.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 20:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-20.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

6 Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie,

Ver. 6. Following him and went in] John came first; Peter entered first: "soft and fair goes far:" soft fire makes sweet malt: leap Christians are not much to be liked; such as quickly step out of profaneness into profession. Hot at hand seldom holds out. The stony ground immediately received the seed with joy, and started up suddenly, ευθεως; but the good ground brings forth fruit with patience or tarriance, εν υπομονη, Luke 8:15. Walk deliberately, and ponder the paths of thy feet, as Solomon bids, Proverbs 4:26. A Christian’s progress is as the sun, which shines more and more to the perfect day, Proverbs 4:18; and as the trumpet in Mount Sion, Exodus 20:18, which sounded louder and louder till it was heard all the country over.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 20:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-20.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 20:6. τὰ ὀθόνια κείμενα, the linen clothes lying) κείμενα, lying, is put before τὰ ὀθόνια in John 20:5; but τὰ ὀθόνια, the linen clothes, is put first in this passage, in antithesis to the napkin. The same participle, employed thrice, signifies, that these were not in a confused and hasty manner cast away. The angels without doubt ministered to Him at His resurrection; and one of them laid in order the linen clothes, the other the napkin. Comp. John 20:12, “One angel at the head (where the sudarium had been), the other at the feet.” For it is probable that the angels had already been there, although Peter and John had not seen them. Comp. Matthew 28:2, “The angel of the Lord descended from heaven, and came and rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it” [which must have been before any disciple came to the tomb].

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Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 20:6". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-20.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 6,7. But Peter, who all along the Gospel appears to have been the boldest spirit, goeth into the cave, and seeth all the linen clothes lying there, and the napkin that was about his head lying by itself.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 20:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-20.html. 1685.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 20:6. Peter is not so withheld. He enters . is probably used here in its stricter sense of seeing so as to draw conclusions.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 20:6". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-20.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

into. Greek. eis. App-104.

seeth = intently beholdeth. Greek. theoreo. App-133.,

lie = lying.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 20:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie,

Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and - being of a bold, resolute character, he at once "went into the sepulchre" - and was rewarded with bright evidence of what had happened.

And seeth the linen clothes lie - `lying.'

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 20:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-20.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

6. He saw the linen cloths lying there. This argues against anyone having stolen the body. It would take time to carefully fold the linen cloths and the cloth that had been around Jesus! head.

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 20:6". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-20.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) And went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie.—Better, . . . beholdeth the linen clothes lie. The word is not the same as that in John 20:5, but expresses the close observation of the linen clothes by St. Peter, while St. John did but see them from without.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 20:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie,
6:67-69; 18:17,25-27; 21:7,15-17; Matthew 16:15,16; Luke 22:31,32
Reciprocal: Luke 24:3 - General

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 20:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-20.html.