Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 3:35

The Father loves the Son and has given all things into His hand.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus Continued;   John;   Power;   Trinity;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Divinity;   Divinity-Humanity;   Dominion;   John the Baptist;   The Topic Concordance - Jesus Christ;   Love;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Power of Christ, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Holy spirit;   Love;   Son of god;   Trinity;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Episcopacy;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Faith;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - John the Baptist;   John, the Gospel According to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Children (Sons) of God;   John, the Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Gospels;   John, Gospel of;   John, Theology of;   Life;   Mss;   Scribes;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Attributes of Christ;   Consecrate, Consecration (2);   Dates (2);   Dominion (2);   Education (2);   Hand ;   Love (2);   Mediator;   Metaphors;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - 8 To Love, Have Affection for;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Mediator;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Baptism (Lutheran Doctrine);   Johannine Theology, the;   Trinity;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for January 16;   Every Day Light - Devotion for January 30;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

All things into his hand - See on Matthew 11:27; (note). A principal design of John is, to show that Christ was infinitely above every teacher, prophet, and Divine messenger that had ever yet appeared. The prophets had various gifts: some had visions, others dreams; some had the gift of teaching, others of comforting, etc.; but none possessed all these gifts: Christ alone possessed their plenitude, and is all things in all.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 3:35". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Loveth the Son - Loves him eminently, above all the prophets and all the other messengers of God.

Hath given all things into his hand - See the notes at Matthew 28:18.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-3.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand.

Again, the baptismal scene was in the mind of the herald. "This is my beloved Son!" He was trying to counteract the jealousy of the disciples who would not follow Jesus by repeating the deduction which he had made following the baptism of Jesus, namely, that God had given all things into Jesus' hands, a deduction he could not have avoided, for "beloved Son" would have required it. These words fit the historical situation exactly, leaving no need for any supposition that the apostle was merely injecting his own words into the narrative at this point.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The Father loveth the Son,.... There is such a relation as that of Father and Son subsisting between the first and second persons in the Trinity; which is not by constitution and appointment: or arbitrary, arising from, and depending on the will of the first, but is natural and necessary; the second person being begotten by the first, and is of the same nature, and equally a divine person: and which relation is the foundation of the distinction of their persons; and which existed from all eternity, and co-existed with their being and essence; and is what no other stand in, angels or men, in such sense as the second person does; and is not to be conceived of, expressed and explained by us: and from this relation arises love; hence, the Son of the Father is his dear Son, the Son of his love; as he must needs be, since he is of the same nature, has the same perfections he has, and is the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person: and hence he continues to love him in every form and appearance of his; in every office he sustains; in every state and condition into which he comes: he delighted in him as his elect, as chosen and appointed by him to be the Saviour of his people; he took pleasure in him as the surety of them, and when he saw him engaging as such, and declaring it was his heart to do his will, and work out their salvation; he loved him when he appeared in human nature, the form of a servant; and in his state of humiliation, more than once he declared, by a voice from heaven, that he was his beloved Son, and particularly at his baptism: and indeed, as in that, so in every thing else, he always did the things that pleased him; he loved him when he laid down his life for the sheep: when he was bruised, and his soul made an offering for sin; he loved him when on the cross, and even when he hid his face from him; when lay in the grave he left him not, nor would he suffer him to see corruption; he raised him front the dead, and gave him glory; exalted him, and received him into heaven with a welcome, and placed him at his right hand; and now looks with pleasure upon him, upon his person, his sacrifice, blood, and righteousness: and this love is a love of complacency and delight, and is from everlasting to everlasting; the evidence of which lows,

and hath given all things into his hand; or "by his hand"; as the doctrines of the Gospel, the gifts of the Spirit, grace, and glory: or rather, "into his hand"; with which he, being the Son of God, a divine person, is fit to be entrusted, which otherwise he would not be: παντα, "all", includes "all persons"; all the angels, the good angels which are chosen in him, and he is the head of; and by whom they are confirmed in the state they are: and who are at his command and beck, and minister to him and his. The evil angels, though they have broke away from God, and rebelled against him, yet are, in some sense, in the hands of Christ, and under his power: as appears by his dispossessing them from the bodies of men on earth, his spoiling them on the cross, and triumphing over them in his ascension to heaven, and by his binding Satan a thousand years. All men are given to him; the elect in a special sense, as his bride and spouse, as his children, and as his sheep; hence, he died for them, and effectually calls them, and brings them to himself; and they shall never perish, or be plucked out of his hands, but shall have eternal life. And wicked men are, in a sense, given to him; their wrath he restrains, and makes it to praise him; he rules then with a rod of iron, and breaks them in pieces as a potter's vessel. And "all things" also are given into his hands; all temporal things, the things of nature and providence; the light of nature, and all the gifts and attainments of it; all the good things of the world, and which are wisdom's left hand blessings; and Christ disposes of them to his people in mercy, and as covenant ones: all spiritual things are in his hands; all the gifts of the Spirit, and the fulness of all grace, sanctifying, justifying, pardoning, adopting, and persevering grace; all the promises and blessings of the covenant; the government of the church, and the judgment of the world; all power, both in heaven and in earth; the salvation of the elect, and their eternal inheritance, happiness, and glory. For all which, creature, angels or men, are fit, only the Son of God.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 3:35". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The Father loveth the Son, and hath b given all things into his hand.

(b) Committed them to his power and will.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 3:35". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-3.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Hath given all things into his hand (παντα δεδωκεν εν τηι χειρι αυτουpanta dedōken en tēi cheiri autou). John makes the same statement about Jesus in John 13:3 (using εις τας χειραςeis tas cheiras instead of εν τηι χειριen tēi cheiri). Jesus makes the same claim in John 5:19-30; Matthew 11:27; Matthew 28:18.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand1.

  1. The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand. This fact was afterwards asserted by Jesus (Matthew 28:18). Jesus is indeed King of kings (Psalms 2:6-8; Matthew 11:27; Acts 2:33; Acts 10:36; Ephesians 1:22).

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 3:35". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-3.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Отец любит Сына. На что направлен этот аргумент? Может быть, Отец ненавидит всех остальных? Ответ готов: здесь идет речь не об обычной любви, коей Бог любит сотворенных людей и другие Свои дела, но о любви особой, которая, сперва излившись на Сына, от Него распространяется на все творения. Эта любовь делает так, что Бог, принимая Сына, одновременно принимает в Нем и всех нас. И Его рукою сообщает нам все Свои блага.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-3.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 35. "The Father loveth the Son and hath given all things into his hand."

The asyndeton between this verse and the preceding may be rendered by this emphatic form: "Because also the Father loveth..." This absolute communication of the Spirit results from the incomparable love which the Father has for the Son. These words are, as it were, the echo of that divine declaration which John had heard at the baptism: "This is my beloved Son." The term ἀγαπᾷ, loves, is taken in the absolute sense, like the expressions: sent and the words. Jesus had used the term Son, when speaking with Nicodemus, John 3:16-18; the second Psalm already applied it to the Messiah in John 3:7; John 3:12 (where every other explanation seems to us untenable); Isaiah and Micah had expressed themselves in a similar way (Isaiah 9:5; Micah 5:2-3). John himself had heard it at the baptism. It is not surprising, therefore, that he uses it here. From this love of the Father flows the gift of all things. Some interpreters, starting from John 3:34, have applied this expression solely to spiritual gifts, to the powers of the Holy Spirit. But the expression into His handdoes not accord with this sense. There is rather an advance upon the idea of John 3:34 : "Not only the Spirit, but all things." By the Spirit, the Son reigns in the heart of believers; this is not enough; the Father has, moreover, given Him universal sovereignty, that He may be able to make all things serve the good of His own. This is exactly the thought which Paul expresses in Ephesians 1:22 by that untranslatable phrase: αὐτὸν ἔδωκεν κεφαλὴν ὑπὲρ πάντα τῇ ἐκκλησίᾳ . The hand is the symbol of free disposal. Thereby John meant to say: "I complain of being despoiled by Him! But He has a right to everything and can take everything without encroachment." And from this follows the striking application which he makes to his disciples, in closing, of the truth which he has just proclaimed:

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Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-3.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

35 The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand.

Ver. 35. The Father loveth the Son] Therefore faith may have firm footing. God hath laid help upon one that is mighty, Psalms 89:19, that our faith and hope may be in God, 1 Peter 1:21.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 3:35". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 3:35. The Father loveth the Son, The affection which the Father bears to his only-begotten Son, is altogether different from the regard which he shewed to his other messengers. They were servants, and were treated as such, being endued with scanty portions of the Spirit in comparison: whereas this is God's Son, for which reason he hath anointed him with the oil of gladness above his fellows, and made him not the greatest Prophet and Priest only, but the greatest King also that ever was; even King and Judgeuniversal; by whose laws men must govern their lives, and at whose bar they shall all finally be tried.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 3:35". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-3.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

The Father loved the Son from eternity, as he was his Son by eternal generation; and he loved by his Mediator by special constitution; he loves him as the brightness if his own glory, and the express image of his own person, with an essential, natural, and necessary love; and he loves him as Mediator, for undertaking our cause, and interposing for our peace.

Learn hence, That God the Father had a special love and affection to Christ, not only in regard of his eternal Sonship, but with respect to his office and Mediatorship; The Father loveth the Son. It follows, He hath given all things into his hand; that is, he hath intrusted him with all things necessary to our salvation.

Lord! what a privilege this, that our happiness is in Christ's hand, not in our own without his. O wonderful goodness, to put our concerns into the sure hands of his Son, which were lost by the weak hands of Adam!

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 3:35". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-3.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

35.] This, again, is the ground why the Father gives not the Spirit by measure (to Him): see Matthew 11:27-29, with which this verse forms a remarkable point of connexion, shewing that what is commonly known as John’s form of expression was not confined to him, but originated higher, having its traces in the synoptic narrative, which is confessedly, in its main features, independent of him.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 3:35". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-3.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 3:35. A further description of the dignity of Christ. The Father hath given unlimited power to His beloved Son.

ἀγαπ.] the ground of the δέδωκ.

πάντα] neut. and without limitation. Falsely Kuinoel: omnes doctrinae suae partes (comp. Grotius: “omnia mysteria regni”)! Nothing is exempted from the Messianic ʼξουσία, by virtue of which Christ is κεφαλὴ ὑπὲρ πάντα, Ephesians 1:22, and πάντων κύριος, Acts 10:36; comp. John 13:3, John 17:2; Matthew 11:27; 1 Corinthians 15:27; Hebrews 2:8.

ἐν τῇ χειρὶ αὐτοῦ] Result of the directionio of the gift, a well-known constructio praegnans. Winer, p. 385 (E. T. p. 454).

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 3:35". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-3.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 3:35. πάντα, all things) Sec John 3:29; John 3:36. To Christ belongs both the Bride (John 3:29, He that hath the bride is the bridegroom), and the Life (John 3:36, He that believeth on the Son, hath everlasting life).— ἐν τῇ χειρί, into His hand) He, therefore, who does not come into the hand [does not bow under the authority] of the Son, does not either receive through faith from the hand of the Son; he does not experience the grace of the Son. The same expression occurs, ch. John 13:3, “Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into His hands.” Subsequently [the expression is] under His feet: 1 Corinthians 15:27, “He hath put all things under His feet.”

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 3:35". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The eternal Father loved the world, John 3:16, but he loved the Son with a more singular and peculiar love; so that all things were by the Father delivered to him, Matthew 11:27, all power in heaven and earth, Matthew 28:18; to give eternal life to as many as the Father had given him, John 17:2; the keys of hell and of death, Revelation 1:18. So as every man hath reason to receive and embrace Christ and his testimony, and to believe in him.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 3:35". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-3.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Hath given all things; pertaining to the salvation of men.

Into his hand; as Mediator, that he might give eternal life to all who should believe in him. Compare chap John 17:2. As all things pertaining to the souls of men are in the hands of Christ and at his disposal, the eternal life of those who believe in him, and the eternal death of those who continue to reject him, are certain.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand.’

Jesus receives the Spirit without measure because He is ‘the Son’ and ‘the Father loves the Son and has given all things into His hands’. This is the first mention of Jesus as ‘the Son’ in this Gospel, but the first of many such mentions. It is a frequent title in John’s Gospel. The title stresses His total uniqueness. He is not one of many but the only One, with a unique relationship to ‘the Father’ above that of the angels. Indeed it is a ‘family’ relationship. He is of the same essence. Compare Matthew 11:27; Luke 10:22; Mark 13:32. This is why all things without exception are given into His hand.

‘Has given all things into his hand.’ There is no restriction to what has been committed to Jesus. He has been set over all things and has power to do whatever He will. He is sovereign over all.

But why was Jesus called ‘the Son’? Did this indicate subordination to the Father? The answer is that it was only for the period during which He carried out His work of salvation that He was subordinate to the Father. In eternity there was no ‘father-son’ relationship (they are earthly terms based on earthly experience). Each member of the Godhead was co-equal and co-eternal. The application to Jesus of the term ‘Son’ is based on using as a picture the earthly relationship of father and son. Its stress is on the fact that both share the same nature, and that the latter performs the will of the former. Thus as the One Who has the same nature as the Father, and has been sent by the Father, Jesus is ‘the Son’.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-3.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

35.Father loveth the Son—From a messenger the Baptist now testifies to Jesus as the Son. His language, inspired by that Son himself, richly accords with many of the Lord’s own testimonies to himself.

All things into his hand—His supremacy over all probationary things entitles him to the submission, faith, and obedience described in the next verse.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-3.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

God not only gave Jesus His Spirit without measure, but He has placed everything in His hands. The Father has been gracious to the Son because He loves Him even as He has been gracious to human beings in providing salvation because He loves us. Everything that the Father has done, revealing and redeeming, flows from His love for people through the Son. This statement also points out the dependence of the human Jesus on the Father, one of John"s major themes.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-3.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 3:35. The Father loveth the Son. There is a continual heightening of the thought and expression. We read of Him ‘that cometh from above,’ Him ‘that cometh out of heaven,’ Him ‘whom God sent,’—‘the Son,’ whom ‘the Father loveth.’ In John 3:17 we read that the Father sent the Son to save the world, because He ‘so loved the world’ (John 3:16): here we read of the love of the Father towards the Son who thus gave Himself for the accomplishment of the purpose of the Father. From chap. John 10:17 it seems probable that it is of this love that we must understand the verse—of a love, therefore, referring to the work of redemption, not to the essential relation of the Son to the Father (comp. note on John 5:20).

And hath given all things into his hand. From perfect love follows perfect communication not of ‘the words of God only (John 3:34), but of all things possessed. The Father has given all things into the Son’s hand. Whatsoever the Son speaks or gives or does, is spoken, given, done, by the Father.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-3.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 3:35. . These absolute expressions, “the Father,” “the Son,” are more naturally referred to the evangelist than to the Baptist. This absolute use of “the Son” as a designation of Christ certainly suggests, if it does not prove, the proper Divinity of Christ. It is the favourite designation in this Gospel. The love of the Father for the Son is the reason for His giving to Him the Spirit: nay, it accounts for His committing all things to His hand; , that is, to possess and to rule. “Facit hic amor, quo Filium amplexus nos quoque in eo amplectitur, ut per illius manum nobis bona sua omnia communicet”—Calvin. But Calvin does not make the mistake of supposing that the words signify “by means of His hand”; cf. Beza. God has made Christ His plenipotentiary for this world and has done so because of His love. It was a boon then to Christ to come into this world and win it to Himself. There is no history, movement, or life of God so glorious as the history of God incarnate.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 3:35". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-3.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The Father loveth the Son. The Father loveth John, loveth Paul, yet he hat not given all things into their hands. The Father loveth the Son, not as a lord does his servants, not as an adopted Son, but as his only begotten Son; therefore hath he given all things into his hands, that as the Father is, so may the Son be. (St. Augustine)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 3:35". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

The Father. See note on John 1:14,

into. Greek en. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 3:35". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand.

The Father loveth the Son, [ agapa (Greek #25), not filei (Greek #5368) - diligit, not amai]. The word denotes the love of character, as distinguished from the mere love of person. But this shade of distinction cannot be expressed in the translation, nor in the present case ought they to be separated.

And hath given all things into his hand. See the note at Matthew 11:27, where we have the same delivering over of all things into the hand of the Son, while here, over and above that, we have the deep spring of that august act, in the Father's ineffable love of the Son.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(35) The Father loveth the Son.—Comp. Note on Matthew 11:27, which is remarkable as an instance of what we call distinctly Johannine thought and diction in the earlier Gospels. We shall meet the words again in John 5:20.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand.
Father
5:20,22; 15:9; 17:23,26; Proverbs 8:30; Isaiah 42:1; Matthew 3:17; 17:5
and
13:3; 17:2; Genesis 41:44,55; Psalms 2:8; Isaiah 9:6,7; Matthew 11:27; 28:18; Luke 10:22; 1 Corinthians 15:27; Ephesians 1:22; Philippians 2:9-11; Hebrews 1:2; 2:8,9; 1 Peter 3:22
Reciprocal: Genesis 25:5 - GeneralGenesis 37:3 - loved;  1 Chronicles 17:13 - my son;  Job 1:12 - power;  Isaiah 49:5 - yet;  Daniel 7:14 - given;  Matthew 10:1 - he gave;  Matthew 21:3 - The Lord;  Matthew 21:37 - last;  Mark 1:11 - Thou;  Mark 12:6 - his;  Luke 1:32 - give;  Luke 9:35 - This;  Luke 20:13 - I will;  John 1:34 - this;  John 11:22 - God will give it thee;  John 16:15 - GeneralActs 2:36 - that same;  Acts 3:13 - hath;  Acts 10:36 - he is;  Romans 1:3 - his Son;  1 Corinthians 15:24 - the kingdom;  2 Corinthians 1:19 - the Son;  Galatians 2:20 - the Son;  Ephesians 1:6 - in;  Colossians 1:13 - his dear Son;  Colossians 1:18 - in all;  Hebrews 3:6 - as;  2 Peter 1:17 - God;  Revelation 2:18 - the Son;  Revelation 5:12 - to receive

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 3:35". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-3.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 35. "The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into His hand."

Augustine: "The Father loveth the Son, but as a father loves a son, not as a master his servant—as the only begotten, not the adopted son. What is meant by all things? That the Son is as great as the Father." On the words, "The Father loveth the Son," the Berleb. Bibel remarks, "As I sufficiently learned from the voice at the Jordan"

Matthew 3:17, οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ υἱός μου ὁ ἀγαπητός. The love of the Father to the Son has for its immediate consequence the declarations: "Kiss the Son," Psalms 2; and, "Woe to the people that despiseth Thee." How must the disciples of John have been ashamed in view of the fact, that other affections had taken the place of love to Christ!

That all things is to be taken in the strictest sense, is shown by the parallel passages: John 13:3; Matthew 11:27; Matthew 28:18, ἐδόθη μοι πᾶσα ἐξουσία ἐν οὐρανῷ καὶ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς; 1 Corinthians 15:27; Revelation 1:18; and even by ver. 36, where, included under all things, the highest of all powers—the decision concerning salvation and condemnation—is especially ascribed to Christ. A limitation is the less admissible, since the proposition, in its unrestricted sense, is a direct result of the Sonship of God—the coming of Jesus from above, ver. 31, from heaven, which is the same as participation in the Godhead. These words, "and hath given all things into His hand," had an express reference to the disciples of John. How terrible is it to set ourselves in opposition to Him who has all things in His hand, who can deprive us of all good, and at last of eternal life, and can bring upon us all evil, and at last "enduring wrath"! Must he not be an enemy to his own welfare, who does not make it the chief end of his life to enter into, and abide in communion with Him?

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 3:35". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-3.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

35.The Father loveth the Son. But what is the meaning of this reason? Does he regard all others with hatred? The answer is easy, that he does not speak of the common love with which God regards men whom he has created, or his other works, but of that peculiar love which, beginning with the Son, flows from him to all the creatures. For that love with which, embracing the Son, he embraces us also in him, leads him to communicate all his benefits to us by his hand.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 3:35". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-3.html. 1840-57.