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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 8:36

"So if the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed.


Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

If the Son … - The Son of God - heir of all things - who is forever with God, and who has therefore the right and power to liberate men from their thraldom.

Shall make you free - Shall deliver you from the bondage and dominion of sin.

Free indeed - Truly and really free. You shall be blessed with the most valuable freedom; not from the chains and oppressions of earthly masters and monarchs, but from the bondage of sin.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-8.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

If therefore the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.

The Pharisees had claimed to be Abraham's seed; but they were merely his fleshly descendants; and the truth Christ was presenting is that to be truly Abraham's "spiritual" seed, they would have to be "in Christ," or "in the Son," and thus reckoned a part of the "seed" singular (Galatians 3:16). Until they accepted Christ, their status would continue to be that of the slave and not that of a son of Abraham.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-8.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

If the Son therefore shall make you free,.... Alluding to the custom of adoption by the sons or brethren in the family, which obtained in Greece, called αδελφοθεσια, "the adoption of brethren", as Grotius, and others have observed; or rather to a custom among the Romans, of a son's making free after his Father's death, such as were born slaves in his house. Such a case as this is supposedF8Theophili Antecensor. Institut. Imperat. Justinian. l. 1. tit. 6. sect. 5. p. 38. ;

"a man having a son or a daughter by his maidservant, that which is born of her, since of a servant, is without doubt a servant: wherefore if he (the son) should say, this is my natural brother or my natural sister; for since my father had children by his maidservant, "whom he did not make free"; and he dying the law has made me lord of these, εγω τουτους ελευθερωσα, "I have made these free", because of their natural kindred.'

This is allowed to be a just and good reason of manumission. Now this answers very much to the case in hand. Men are home born slaves; the chosen people of God are such by nature; they are born in sin, and are the servants of it; Christ the Son makes them free; and then they are no more foreigners and strangers, but fellow citizens with the saints, and of the household of God. This suggests, that true freedom is by Jesus Christ, the Son of God; see Galatians 5:1. He it is that makes the saints free from sin; not from the being of it in this life, but from the bondage and servitude of it, from its power and dominion, and from its guilt and liableness to punishment for it, by procuring the pardon of their sins through his blood, and justifying their persons by his righteousness: he also makes them free, or delivers them from the captivity of Satan, by ransoming them out of his hands, taking the prey from the mighty, binding the strong man armed, and delivering them from him, and from the power of darkness, and putting them into his own kingdom; he does not indeed free them altogether from his temptations, but he preserves them by his power from being hurt and destroyed by him: he likewise makes his people free from the law, not only the ceremonial law, which is abolished by him, but from the moral law; not from obedience to it, as it is in his hands, and a rule of walk and conversation to them, but as in the hands of Moses, and as a covenant of works, and from the rigorous exaction of it, and from seeking justification and life by it, and from its curse and condemnation: and he gives them freedom of access to God, as their Father, through his blood and by his Spirit; and admits them to all the privileges and immunities of the church below; and gives them a right to, faith in, and an expectation of the glorious liberty of the children of God hereafter; and such are truly Christ's freemen:

ye shall be free indeed; this is true freedom; what the Jews boasted of, supposing what they said was right, was but a shadow of freedom in comparison of this; and that liberty which sinful men promise themselves in sin, is all deceit; there is no true, solid, substantial freedom but what is by Christ, the Son of God. Even that freedom which the children of God had under the legal dispensation, was a servitude, in comparison of that which the saints enjoy by Christ under the Gospel dispensation; though they were sons and heirs, yet being in bondage, differed nothing from servants, being under tutors and governors, in bondage under the elements of the world, and under the influence of a spirit of bondage unto fear; see Galatians 4:1; but such that have received the spirit of adoption from Christ, they are really free: they have not only the name of children, and of freemen, but they are truly such, and wholly so; perhaps there may be some reference had to such sort of persons among the Jews, who were partly servants, and partly free: so it is saidF9Misn. Gittin, c. 4. sect. 5. & Ediot, c. 1. sect. 13. ,

מי שחציו עבד, "he who is half a servant", or partly a servant, and partly free, shall serve his master one day, and himself another.'

And such an one, as the commentatorsF11Maimonides, Jarchi, & Bartenora in ib. say, is one who is a servant of two partners, and is made free by one of them; or who has paid half his price to his master (for his freedom), but the other half is still due: and of one in such circumstances it is saidF12Misn. Pesachim, c. 8. sect. 1. , that

"he that is partly a servant, and partly free, may not eat of his master's (lamb at the passover):'

but now those who are made free by Christ the Son of God, they are not in part only, but are wholly free, and have a right to all the privileges of his house, to the supper of the Lord, and to every other immunity.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 8:36". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-8.html. 1999.

People's New Testament

If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed. If you would be free indeed you must have the freedom that the Son bestows, and become children. In order to fully comprehend the figure, read Galatians 4:19-21.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 8:36". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-8.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

If therefore the son shall make you free (εαν ουν ο υιος υμας ελευτερωσηιean oun ho huios humas eleutherōsēi). Condition of third class with εανean and first aorist (ingressive) active subjunctive. “If therefore the Son set you free,” as he has the power to do.

Ye shall be free indeed (οντως ελευτεροι εσεστεontōs eleutheroi esesthe). Old and common adverb from participle οντωνontōn actually, really (cf. Luke 24:34). But this spiritual freedom was beyond the concept or wish of these Jews.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-8.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Indeed ( ὄντως )

Used by John only here. It means essentially.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-8.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.

If I therefore make you free, ye — shall partake of the same privilege: being made free from all guilt and sin, ye shall abide in the house of God for ever.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 8:36". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-8.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

If therefore the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed1.

  1. If therefore the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed. See .


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 8:36". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-8.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

36.If then the Son shall make you free. By these words he means that the right of freedom belongs to himself alone, and that all others, being born slaves, cannot be delivered but by his grace. For what he possesses as his own by nature he imparts to us by adoption, when we are ingrafted by faith into his body, and become his members. Thus we ought to remember what I said formerly, that the Gospel is the instrument by which we obtain our freedom So then ourfreedom is a benefit conferred by Christ, but we obtain it by faith, in consequence of which also Christ regenerates us by his Spirit. When he says that they shall be truly free, there is an emphasis on the word truly; for we must supply the contrast with the foolish persuasion by which the Jews were swelled with pride, in like manner as the greater part of the world imagine that they possess a kingdom, while they are in the most wretched bondage.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-8.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

CHRIST THE LIBERATOR

‘If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.’

John 8:36 (R.V).

These kindly words breathe the very spirit of our Master. Christ here declares that His service is perfect freedom. ‘If the Son shall make you free ye shall be free indeed.’ For this assertion He gives two reasons. One is that He bestows a new and emancipating knowledge: ‘If ye abide in My word … ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.’ The other is that He can permanently reconcile us with our environment: ‘The servant abideth not in the house for ever; but the Son abideth for ever. If therefore the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.’

I. Truth emancipates.—To some of us, and perhaps in certain moods to all, the reverse appears to be the fact. Does not every new revelation bring new claims, new duties, burdens, and responsibilities? It is the promulgation of a new law, and how can it profess to offer, of all things, liberty? But when you consider the matter you find that, instead of creating these obligations, a true revelation only makes us aware of realities already existing, facts which vitally concern us. Thus it appears that knowledge, in the act of telling us what restraints are necessary, is our deliverer from a thousand false and tyrannous coercions. Applying this argument to religion, what do we find? Religion, even in its lowest forms, is a theory of life, an answer to great practical questions. What is life—and death? What is sin? What am I? and where are those who have left me? and what is the meaning of my vast unspeakable desires and fears, of my unappeasable loneliness, and of the awful haunting consciousness that I am not alone? These are a part of human nature, as real as the processes of digestion: until I can answer these questions I am in bondage, like a mountain climber caught by mists among the precipices, unable to go back or forward, and freezing while he stands still. Only the light can release him: only the truth can make me free. And to-day there is only one reasonable faith amid the wrecks and ruins of a hundred creeds—amid the debris of our religious theories, almost as many as the scientific theories which have become outworn and cast away, while science lives—Jesus Christ stands alone, immortal, leading still the progress of the race, its keenest thought, its largest aspiration, its wisest benevolence. And thus, because knowledge emancipates, and He is the answer to our deepest problems, they whom He makes free are free indeed.

II. But again, Christ claims to emancipate us, not only by this gift of knowledge, but by reconciling man with his environment.—This, He says, no other power can do, if only because all others pass away and perish: ‘the servant abideth not in the house for ever, but the Son abideth for ever; if therefore the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.’ How may we have peace and liberty amid the stress and pressure of doubtful circumstances? Your business, the more it expands the more is it the sport of events entirely uncontrollable by you: a foreign war, a commercial crisis, the dishonesty of one whom you have never seen. And your reputation, that is a plant sensitive enough to begin to shrivel in the breath of some slander whispered in the dark. And your health, and your family—how many of the contingencies that can wreck them are within your control? What answer has all art and science for the despairing cry, ‘Oh, wretched man that I am, who shall deliver me from this body of death?’ Still, as in the first century, it is Christ only Who can respond; and to-day there are millions, as there have been millions in every century since the first, in whose experience He has done it. He introduces into the soul a new influence, all-pervading and all-harmonising; and as gravitation reconciles a thousand cosmic forces otherwise at war, so ‘the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus sets me free from the law of sin and death.’ God is no longer One from Whom we would fain escape into some far-off land. He is a loving Father, Who awaits us with pardon and the best robe and music and a festival of joy. And man is my brother, one of my family; rude possibly and needing to be restrained, but still one to whose claims I may willingly surrender my own. Christ Himself knew what it was to cry, ‘Let this cup pass from Me’; but because His appeal was not to a deaf and stony Fate, because He could say, ‘O my Father,’ therefore He could add with a true and free assent, ‘nevertheless … Thy will be done.’

Bishop G. A. Chadwick.

Illustration

‘Life is to each of us like the instrument which Hamlet offers to Guildenstern—“but this cannot I command to any utterance of harmony; I have not the skill”—aud nothing can be drawn from it but a shriek. It is by long and hard study, by perfect knowledge and obedience to the laws of harmony, that at last its capabilities are grasped, its music elicited, and the performer attains what every minstrel seeks, what he rightly calls freedom of execution, the freedom which only comes when every touch is regulated, every inflection is an obedience, yet all is easy and swift and true and glad.’

(SECOND OUTLINE)

‘FREE INDEED’

There are some of us, and not a few, who do not really ‘stand forth in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free.’ We are tied and bound. Perhaps to some besetting sin; perhaps to the world, and, if not, at least to our own little, narrow hearts, with all our doubts, and all our fears. And so we are living on in our poor little worldly circle with little of light and life. We want more holy and lofty confidences: and to this end we want closer communion and freer access to God and His promises.

I. How is this to be done?—How shall we reach out to the greater freedom? In one and only one way. Christ, the risen Christ, Christ the Son—the Son of God and the Son of Man—He is the great and only Liberator. ‘If, if the Son therefore shall make you free.’ All depends upon that word ‘if.’ It is the one condition, it is the positive and absolute prerequisite. He alone can do it. It is His prerogative. No human power can do it. All your efforts will never do it. ‘If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.’ The Son of God became the Son of man, and He might do this very thing; so that the word is doubly true and doubly emphatic, the Son, the Son of God, being the Son of Man. His life and death and resurrection have accomplished this perfect liberation.

II. A new power comes into the man’s mind who has acquired freedom.—The power of the Holy Ghost. His sin remains, but his sin is no longer the ruling power. Now that man has become ‘free,’ he is ‘free’ at the mercy seat, he has ‘free’ access to God, whenever and wherever he likes, by a new and living way; he is ‘free’ to go into the presence-chamber of the King of kings. And that sanctuary is his home. He carries burdens, but he leans so upon Another’s arm that he walks with a firm step and a light heart up the hill. And he sees his way straight before him to an open gate, and within that gate he sees peeps of heaven all along as he goes. And every night he casts his cares, and he washes away the day’s sin, so that every morning he rises ‘free’ and fresh for the day’s duties, or the day’s trials or the day’s mercies. And so that man goes on freer and freer. His heart is free to live or free to die. ‘To live is Christ, and to die is gain.’ But he will never die; he will never die. The Son of Man hath made him ‘free’ of all death. Presently, gently, and with his own willing mind, he will lie down and sleep, and he will awake in Paradise. The grave is no prison-house to him. ‘Free among the dead,’ he rests his appointed time till his Saviour comes.

—Rev. James Vaughan.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 8:36". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-8.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

36 If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.

Ver. 36. Free indeed] Not seemingly so, or in conceit only, as those lost libertines, 2 Peter 2:1; 2 Peter 2:19. Ahaz thought himself helped or hurt by the gods of Syria; but he only thought so, 2 Chronicles 28:23, and all such fond thoughts perish, Psalms 146:4.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 8:36". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-8.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 8:36. If the Son therefore shall make you free, "The only way to arrive at the relationship above mentioned,—to become children of God, is to believe in and submit to the authority of his Son; in which case the Son will adopt you as co-heirs with himself. If the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed; free from the slavery of sin, free to do good; free in respect of your right to the inheritance, and free in your possession of present privileges and present blessing."


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 8:36". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-8.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

36.] Ye then, being in sin, are carnal: the sons of the bondwoman, and therefore need liberation. Now comes in the spiritual reality, into which the discourse passes from the figure. This liberation can only take place by means of Him of whom Isaac was the type—the Seed according to promise; those only who of His Spirit are born again, and after His image, are ὄντως ἐλεύθεροι—truly sons of God, and no longer children of the bondwoman, but of the free. See by all means Galatians 4:19 (where the subject really begins, not at John 8:21) to end, which is the best commentary on this verse. There neither is, nor can be here, any allusion either to the liberation of the sabbatical year (Œcolampadius); or to the subject of Hebrews 3:5-6 (Euthym(129), after Chrys.).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 8:36". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-8.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1653

THE LIBERTY WHICH CHRIST GIVES HIS PEOPLE

John 8:36. If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.

WE are exceedingly backward to acknowledge our true state and condition. In consequence of this we disregard the remedy provided for us, and deprive ourselves of all the blessings of salvation. Nevertheless our gracious Saviour endures us with much long-suffering, and repeats to us the overtures of love and mercy. Thus he acted towards those who denied their need of freedom [Note: He might have shewn that their assertions were false: for their ancestors had been in bondage both in Egypt and in Babylon; and at that very time the whole nation was under the Roman yoke. But our Lord waved the subject of civil liberty, and fixed their attention on a freedom of a very different kind: he shewed them that, though they were the natural descendants of Abraham, they were the servants of sin, and should on that account, like Ishmael, be cast out: while they only, who were the sons of promise, should, like Isaac, abide in the house for ever. (Compare ver. 35. with Galatians 4:28; Galatians 4:30.) Then, speaking of himself as in a more peculiar manner “the Son,” and as the seed in whom all nations should be blessed, he again repeated his offer, and encouraged them to accept it.]: thus also he addresses himself to us at this time.

It will be profitable for us to consider—

I. In what respects we are in bondage—

We of this nation may justly boast of our civil freedom; but we are, like all the rest of our species, under spiritual bondage.

1. Under the curse of the law—

[The law of God requires perfect and perpetual obedience. It denounces also a curse against us for every transgression [Note: Galatians 3:10.]. Its precepts have been violated by us in ten thousand instances [Note: Romans 3:19; Romans 3:23.]. We all therefore, without exception, are obnoxious to its curse. This may well be considered as a state of wretched bondage [Note: Galatians 3:23. ἐφρουρούμεθα συγκεκλεισμένοι strongly expresses the idea of close custody.].]

2. Under the power of sin—

[Sin has infected all the members of our body, and the faculties of our soul [Note: Psalms 53:3.]. What can be conceived to argue a state of slavery so much as this [Note: John 8:34.]? This construction is so obvious, that no Christian can doubt respecting it [Note: Romans 6:16.]. The church of old confessed her iniquities to have been a sore bondage [Note: Isaiah 26:13.], and St. Paul himself could find no better image whereby to express the evil and bitterness of his indwelling corruptions [Note: Romans 7:14; Romans 7:23.].]

3. Under the tyranny of Satan—

[The influence of Satan over us is often denied and ridiculed; but the wickedness of men is ascribed in Scripture to his agency [Note: Ephesians 2:2.], and every impenitent sinner is expressly said to be in bondage to him [Note: 2 Timothy 2:26.].]

4. Under the fear of death—

[Many will shew a contempt for death on a field of battle, but all fear it in its more gradual approaches. Hence even the bravest are averse to meditate on death and judgment. This is declared to be a state of wretched bondage [Note: Hebrews 2:15.].]

Surely the Egyptian or Chaldean yoke was light in comparison of this; yet all may obtain a release from this yoke.

II. How we may be delivered from it—

Vain are all attempts to liberate ourselves by our own strength—

[We cannot make satisfaction for one single breach of the law. To do this were beyond the power of the highest archangel. Nothing but the blood of Christ can ever atone for sin [Note: Hebrews 10:4; Hebrews 10:11-12; Hebrews 10:14.]. We cannot by any means renew and sanctify our own hearts. There is not in us a sufficiency even to think a good thought [Note: 2 Corinthians 3:5.]. Our inclination and ability to do good can come from God alone [Note: Philippians 2:13.]. It is not in the power of fallen man to resist the assaults of Satan. There is provided for us armour of a heavenly temper, and in that alone can any man hope to obtain the victory [Note: Ephesians 6:11; Ephesians 6:13.]. We are no less unable of ourselves to disarm death of its sting. In spite of all our efforts its terrors will appal the stoutest heart.]

But “the Son” of God is able and willing to deliver us—

[Christ, as “the Son,” is heir and Lord of all things [Note: Hebrews 1:2.]. The very intent for which he came into the world was to give us liberty [Note: Isaiah 61:1.]. He has paid down his own life as the price of our redemption [Note: 1 Peter 1:18-19.], and therefore may claim us as “his purchased possession.” He is also commissioned to liberate us by his power [Note: Luke 11:20-22.]. All fulness resides in him for this very purpose [Note: Psalms 68:18.]; nor will he withhold this blessing from any believing soul [Note: John 1:12.].]

Unspeakably blessed are they to whom this blessing is vouchsafed—

III. What glorious liberty we may obtain—

The liberty which sinners enjoy is merely ideal; but that which Christ will give, is real and substantial [Note: ὄντως.].

1. He will free us from all our bondage—

[The law shall never be suffered to execute its curse upon us: [Note: Romans 8:1.] Christ gave himself up as our surety, on purpose to redeem us from it [Note: Galatians 3:13.]: it shall have no more power over us than a dead man over the wife that survives him [Note: Romans 7:1-4.]. Sin also shall be cast down from the throne which it has erected within us; nor, though it may renew its assaults, shall it ever regain its dominion [Note: Romans 6:6-14.]. Christ will never suffer this great end of his death to be frustrated [Note: Titus 2:14.]. Satan himself too shall yield to the all-conquering arm of Jesus [Note: Romans 16:20.], and flee from the face of the very meanest of his saints; [Note: Contrast 2 Timothy 2:26. with James 4:7.] Nor shall death appear any longer formidable as an enemy [Note: 1 Corinthians 15:55.]; it shall be accounted our gain, and numbered amongst our treasures [Note: Philippians 1:23. 1 Corinthians 3:22.].]

2. He will introduce us to a state of perfect freedom—

[There is “a glorious liberty into which God’s children shall be brought.” Christ will pour into their hearts a spirit of adoption [Note: Romans 8:15.], and admit them to the most intimate fellowship with himself [Note: Revelation 3:20.]. The most difficult duties also he will render pleasant to their souls [Note: Psalms 119:32.]; nor will he confine his blessings to this present life. To all eternity shall his redeemed delight themselves in him: their capacity of enjoyment shall be inconceivably enlarged; and every power be freely exercised in its proper functions.]

Inferences—

1. How glorious a Saviour is Jesus Christ!

[There is no bond-slave whom he will not liberate. He offers too this liberty “without money, and without price.” He even esteems himself glorified in conferring it upon us. Let us all admire and adore his goodness, and by faith apply to him for this perfect freedom.]

2. How just will be the condemnation of those that perish!

[None ever perish but through their own fault; their condemnation is the consequence of their obstinate attachment to the bonds in which they are held [Note: John 3:19.]. O that men would reflect how they will one day condemn themselves! Let it be remembered that such offers of mercy will never be made to us in the eternal world. This is a day of grace; but there will come a day of vengeance [Note: Isaiah 61:2.]. Let every one then lay the blame where it is justly due, and follow without delay the salutary advice of David [Note: Psalms 2:12.]—]


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on John 8:36". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/john-8.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 8:36. ὑιός) the Son, the only-begotten.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 8:36". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-8.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

If that term the Son in this verse be the same with the Son mentioned in the former verse, they must both be understood of Christ: for it is most certain, that here the Son can signify no more than Christ, to whom alone it belongeth to make souls free from the slavery of the law, sin, death, hell, &c. Now, saith our Saviour, this is the true freedom. Alas! What is the freedom you boast of and glory in? It is not the freedom of your inward man, if you were in the fullest actual possession of it; many a one in that sense free, hath a base, servile, slavish mind, and is a servant to corruption and lusts. It is only the freedom which I give unto souls, that is a true and perfect liberty, and is alone worthy the name of it.


Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 8:36". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-8.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

If the Son; the Son of God, who abides in his Father’s house for ever, and to whom he has committed all power over it.

Free indeed; for ye shall not only be delivered from the bondage of sin and its punishment, but made sons of God with and through Christ, and have an everlasting home with him in his Father’s house.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-8.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

36. ἐὰν οὖν ὁ υἱός. As before, any son is meant. ‘If the son emancipates you, your freedom is secured; for he is always on the spot to see that the emancipation is carried out.’ The statement is general, but with special reference to the Son of God, who frees men by granting them a share in His Sonship. If they will abide in His word (John 8:31), He will abide in them (John 6:56), and will take care that the bondage from which He has freed them is not thrust upon them again.

ὄντως. Here only in S. John: comp. Luke 23:47; Luke 24:34; 1 Timothy 5:3; 1 Timothy 5:5; 1 Timothy 5:16. It expresses reality as opposed to appearance; ἀληθῶς (John 8:31, John 4:42, John 6:14, John 7:40) implies that this reality is known.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on John 8:36". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/john-8.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

36. Son… shall make you free—Break the bond, and transform the slave to a freeman.

Free indeed—There is none can question his emancipation act.

The remainder of this discourse may be thus analyzed.

I. Character of these Jews, in implied contrast with Jesus, John 8:37-47.

II. Character of Jesus, in comparison with Israel, John 8:48-58.

I. They are Abraham’s seed, (corporeally,) but not his children, (morally,) as shown by their murderous intent, John 8:37-40. They are not children of God but of Satan, (in contrast with him, the Son of God,) John 8:41-47.

II. Against their calumnies Jesus maintains that he speaks, not from a demon, but from God, the life-giving word, 4vv. 8-51. Against their cavils (John 8:52-53) he maintains he honours God supremely, (John 8:54-55,) and is prior to, and Lord of, even Abraham!

I. Abraham’s corporeal seed are not his spiritual children, John 8:37-40.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-8.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Son of God also has the authority to liberate spiritual slaves from their bondage to sin and its consequences. Real freedom consists of liberty from sin"s enslavement to do what we should do. It does not mean that we may do just anything we please. We are now free to do what pleases God, which we could not do formerly. When we do what pleases God, we discover that it also pleases us. Hope for real freedom, therefore, does not rest on Abrahamic ancestry but Jesus" action.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-8.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 8:36. If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed. It is manifestly a special freedom that is here thought of,—freedom gained by becoming sons, and thus gaining all that belongs to the position of a son, retaining for ever a connection with the Father’s house. One only can give this freedom, for One only can give this Sonship,—He who is the Son (see chap. John 1:12). ‘Free indeed,’ not in appearance only, as a favoured slave might seem for a time to hold the place of a son in the house: ‘free indeed,’ because receiving the freedom and sonship from One who ‘remains in the house for ever,’ and never loses the rights of the Son. John 8:33 speaks of the means (‘the truth’), this verse of the Giver of freedom (‘the Son’). The word here rendered ‘indeed’ is a very remarkable one: it is used nowhere else in the writings of John. Closely connected with the verb ‘I am’ of John 8:28, it is hardly possible to avoid the impression that it is designedly employed in order to bring out that closeness of relation between the sons of God and the Son which is so striking a part of the teaching of this chapter.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-8.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

never was without free-will; but, having the grace of Christ, his will is truly made free from the servitude of sin. (St. Augustine, tract. 41. in Joan.)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 8:36". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-8.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

ye shall be free indeed = ye will be really free. indeed. Greek. ontos. Not the same word as in John 8:31. Compare 1 Timothy 6:19, Revised Version.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 8:36". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-8.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.

If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed. A very glorious statement, the sense of which may be thus expressed: 'And if your connection with the family of God be that of BOND-SERVANTS, ye have no natural tie to the house; your tie is essentially uncertain and precarious. But THE SON'S relationship to the FATHER is a natural and essential one; it is an indefeasible tie; His abode in it is perpetual and of right: That is My relationship, My tie: If, then, ye would have your connection with God's family made real, rightful, permanent, ye must by the Son be manumitted and adopted as sons and daughters of the Lord Almighty.' In this sublime statement there is no doubt a subordinate allusion to Genesis 21:10, "Cast out this bond-woman and her son, for the son of this bond-woman shall not be heir with my son, with Isaac" (Compare Gal. 4:22-20 ).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(36) If the Son therefore shall make you free.—Now the thought of John 8:31-32 is repeated in special reference to the position they had claimed for themselves. There is need for the emancipation of which He has spoken, and His mission in the world is to proclaim it. If they will enter into spiritual union with Him, and abide in this new spiritual relation, it will make them new creatures, freed from sin by the power of truth. In the language of St. Paul, as quoted above, “Christ will be formed in them.” They will become “members of Christ” and “children of God.” The Son of the divine household will make them free, and in Him they will become members of the great family of God Himself. (Comp. the same thought of the divine household as addressed by St. Paul specially to Gentiles, in Ephesians 2:11-22. See also in this Gospel, John 14:2-3.)

Ye shall be free indeed.—Or, ye shall be free in reality.—The word is not the same as that rendered “indeed,” in John 8:31. They claimed political freedom, but they were in reality the subjects of Rome. They claimed religious freedom, but they were in reality the slaves to the letter. They claimed moral freedom, but they were in reality the bondmen of sin. The freedom which the Son proclaimed was in reality freedom, for it was the freedom of their true life delivered from the thraldom of sin and brought into union with God. For the spirit of man, that in knowledge of the truth revealed through the Son can contemplate the Father and the eternal home, there is a real freedom that no power can restrain. All through this context the thoughts pass unbidden to the teaching of St. Paul, the great apostle of freedom. There could be no fuller illustration of the words than is furnished in his life. He, like St. Peter and St. John (Romans 1:1, e.g.; 2 Peter 1:1; Revelation 1:1), had learnt to regard himself as a “bondservant,” but it was of Christ, “whose service is perfect freedom.” We feel, as we think of him in bonds before Agrippa, or a prisoner at Rome, that he is more truly free than governor or Cæsar before whom he stands, and more truly free than he himself was when he was armed with authority to bind men and women because they were Christians. The chains that bind the body cannot bind the spirit, whose chains have been loosed. He is free indeed, for the Son has made him free.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 8:36". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.
31,32; Psalms 19:13; 119:32,133; Isaiah 49:24,25; 61:1; Zechariah 9:11,12; Luke 4:18; Romans 8:2; 2 Corinthians 3:17; Galatians 5:1

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 8:36". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-8.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

If the Son makes you free. See Galatians 4:19-31.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 8:36". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-8.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ver. 36. "If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed."

This clause is connected with ver. 34 , where beneath the general proposition the special one was concealed: "Ye, because ye commit sin, are servants of sin." Ver. 35—which contains only a bye-thought, pointing to the ruinous consequences of sin, and the loss which it entails of the noblest of all possessions, participation in the wisdom of God—only comes into consideration so far as it must urge the Jews eagerly to desire the good that was offered to them in Christ. Thus, since ye are the servants of sin, ye are not free of the house, as ye think.

Christ might have said. If I make you free. But He speaks of Himself as the Son, in order to point out that the sonship of which ver. 35 had spoken had its foundation in Himself, so that no man could be a partaker of it who stands not in living connection with Him: comp. ch. John 1:12. Berl. Bible: "Here the words rise to the Son, from whom all the other children of grace derive their birth and prerogatives." The ὄντως points the contrast to the imagined freedom of the Jews: comp. ver. 33. "My freedom," says Quesnel, "is that in me which is most slavish and base so long as Thou dost not set it free. The more Thou leavest it to itself, the less free will it be."


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Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 8:36". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-8.html.

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Monday, August 10th, 2020
the Week of Proper 14 / Ordinary 19
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