Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 9:17

So they *said to the blind man again, "What do you say about Him, since He opened your eyes?" And he said, "He is a prophet."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Converts;   Faith;   Jesus Continued;   Sabbath;   Testimony;   Thompson Chain Reference - Inescapable Question;   Prophet, Christ as;   Question, Inescapable;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Miracle;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jesus christ;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Pharisees;   Prophet, Christ as;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Beggar;   Error;   Foresight;   Prophet;   Sabbath ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Silence;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Sabbath;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He is a prophet - They had intended to lay snares for the poor man, that, getting him to acknowledge Christ for the Messiah, they might put him out of the synagogue, John 9:22, or put him to death, that such a witness to the Divine power of Christ might not appear against them. But, as the mercy of God had given him his sight, so the wisdom of God taught him how to escape the snares laid for his ruin. On all thy glory there shall be a defense, says the prophet, Isaiah 4:5. When God gives any particular mercy or grace, he sends power to preserve it, and wisdom to improve it. The man said, He is a prophet. Now, according to a Jewish maxim, a prophet might dispense with the observation of the Sabbath. See Grotius. If they allow that Jesus was a prophet, then, even in their sense, he might break the law of the Sabbath, and be guiltless: or, if they did not allow him to be a prophet, they must account for the miracle some other way than by the power of God; as from Satan or his agents no good can proceed - to do this it was impossible. So the wisdom of God taught the poor man to give them such an answer as put them into a complete dilemma, from which they could not possibly extricate themselves.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 9:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-9.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

What sayest thou of him? … - The translation here expresses the sense obscurely. The meaning is, “What sayest thou of him for giving thee sight?” (Campbell); or, “What opinion of him hath this work of power and mercy to thee wrought in thee?” (Hammond).

He is a prophet - That is “I think that the power to work such a miracle proves that he is sent from God. And though this has been done on the Sabbath, yet it proves that he must have been sent by God, for such a power could never have proceeded from man.” We see here:

1.A noble confession made by the man who was healed, in the face of the rulers of the people, and when he doubtless knew that they were opposed to Jesus. We should never be ashamed, before any class of men, to acknowledge the favors which we have received from Christ, and to express our belief of his power and of the truth of his doctrine.

2.The works of Jesus were such as to prove that he came from God, however much he may have appeared to oppose the previous notions of men, the interpretation of the law by the Pharisees, or the deductions of reason. People should yield their own views of religion to the teachings of God, and believe that he that could open the eyes of the blind and raise the dead was fitted to declare his will.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-9.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

They say therefore unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, in that he opened thine eyes? And he said, He is a prophet.

This was not an admission of the miracle but has the meaning, "Seeing that you say he opened your eyes, who do you say he is?"

He is a prophet ... Some progression in the man's thinking appears in this. He referred to him first as "the man that is called Jesus," and now as "a prophet," reminding one of the progressive enlightenment of the woman of Samaria in John 4.

This recognition of Jesus as a prophet carried a strong negative thrust against the Pharisees' charge of sabbath-breaking. Dummelow pointed out that "prophets had authority over the sabbath."[7] Likewise Clarke stated that "According to a Jewish maxim, a prophet might dispense with the observance of the sabbath."[8] Thus, the blind man refuted the Pharisees' charge; but they would not allow to Jesus even the status of a prophet.

[7] J. R. Dummelow, op. cit., p. 791.

[8] Adam Clarke, Commentary on the Holy Bible (London: Mason and Lane, 1837), Vol. V, p. 586.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-9.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

They say unto the blind man again,.... After they had discoursed among themselves, and could not agree about the author of the miracle, they turn to him that had been blind, who is called the blind man, because he had been so, and ask him his sentiments of him:

what sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes? the question seems, at first sight, as if it was, whether Jesus had opened his eyes or not; but by the answer it appears, that it required his thoughts of him, "who hath opened thine eyes", as the Vulgate Latin and Persic versions read; or "seeing", or "because he hath opened thine eyes", as the Arabic and Ethiopic versions:

he said, he is a prophet; the Syriac and Persic versions read, "I say he is a prophet"; or, "he is certainly a prophet", as the Arabic version. The Jews were wont to conclude a man's being a prophet from miracles wrought by him; see John 6:14; though it does not appear that he believed him, as yet, to be that prophet, or the Messiah, that was to come; see John 9:36.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 9:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-9.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

the blind man … said, He is a prophet — rightly viewing the miracle as but a “sign” of His prophetic commission.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-9.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

He said, He is a prophet. A little while before he had said that "a man called Jesus" healed him; now he declares that "he is a prophet;" a little later he is prepared to receive him as the Son of God. His convictions constantly deepened.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 9:17". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-9.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Unto the blind man again (τωι τυπλωι παλινtōi tuphlōi palin). The doctors disagree and they ask the patient whose story they had already heard (John 9:15).

In that he opened thine eyes (οτι ηνεωιχεν σου τους οπταλμουςhoti ēneōixen sou tous ophthalmous). Causal use of οτιhoti and triple augment in the first aorist active indicative of ανοιγωanoigō They offer the excuse that the man‘s experience particularly qualified him to explain the “how,” overlooking the fact he had already told his story and also trying to conceal their own hopeless division of opinion.

He is a prophet
(προπητης εστινprophētēs estin). The man will go that far anyhow.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-9.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

They say unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes? He said, He is a prophet.

What sayest thou of him, for that he hath opened thine eyes? — What inference dost thou draw herefrom?

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 9:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-9.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

They say therefore unto the blind man again1, What sayest thou of him, in that he opened thine eyes2? And he said, He is a prophet3.

  1. They say therefore unto the blind man again. Both parties of the Pharisees.

  2. What sayest thou of him, in that he opened thine eyes? Each party asked the opinion of the blind man, hoping to get something to aid their side of the argument--one party trusting to the man's gratitude, and the other to his fear of the rulers.

  3. And he said, He is a prophet. A far more pronounced confession than that which he have in John 9:11.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 9:17". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-9.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Опять говорят слепому. Чем глубже они исследуют, тем сильнее утверждает себя божественная истина. Они поступают как тот, кто дует на пламя, желая его затушить. Итак, всякий раз, когда мы видим, что нечестивые готовы на все, дабы подавить божественную истину, у нас нет причин для страха. Мы не должны сильно беспокоиться об исходе дела, ибо они только еще ярче раздуют ее пламя. Кроме того, выведывая у слепого, что он думает, они поступают так не потому, что им важно его мнение, но потому, что надеются на его страх. На то, что из-за страха он ответит им то, что они желают слышать. Господь свел на нет все их усилия в этой части. Ибо то, что простой человек бестрепетно, презрев их угрозы, исповедал Христа пророком, следует заслуженно приписать божественной благодати, и сия уверенность представляет собой как бы еще одно чудо. То же, что слепой столь сердечно и охотно исповедал Христа пророком, хотя и не знал, что Он Сын Божий, еще больше устыжает вероломство тех, кто из-за страха или отрекается от Христа, или молчит о Нем. Хотя они знают, что Он сидит одесную Отца и придет оттуда судить весь мир. Итак, поскольку этот слепой не хотел угашать даже слабую искорку знания о Христе, надо стараться, чтобы Тот, Кто воссиял в наших сердцах во всей полноте, провозглашался нами в столь же полном и подлинном исповедании.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-9.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

17 They say unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes? He said, He is a prophet.

Ver. 17. He is a prophet] The more the Pharisees opposed the truth, the more it appeared. Veritas abscondi erubeseit, saith Tertullian. The Reformation was much furthered in Germany by the Papists’ opposition. Among many others two kings wrote against Luther, viz. Henry VIII of England and Ludovicus of Hungary. This kingly title being entered into the controversy, made men more curious. And as it happeneth in combats that the onlookers are ready to favour the weaker and to extol his actions, though they be but mean; so here it stirred up a general inclination toward Luther, saith the author of the Hist. of the Council of Trent. Luther also in an epistle to the Elector of Saxony, triumpheth and derideth the foolish wisdom of the Papists in causing him and the other Protestant princes to rehearse the confession of their faith in a public assembly of the States of Germany, and in sending copies thereof to all the courts of Christendom for advice; whereby the Gospel was more propagated, and the cause of Christ more advanced, than if many preachers had been sent out and licensed.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 9:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-9.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 9:17. They say unto the blind man He is so named after having received his sight, agreeable to the scripture phraseology. Thus Matthew 10:3. Matthew is called the publican, after he had left off that employment; and Matthew 26:6. Simon is called the leper, after he was cured. The next clause should be rendered, What sayest thou of him, since he hath opened, or for having opened thine eyes? This question was proposed to the man, not so much to know his opinion, as to divert the members of the sanhedrim from carrying on their altercation any further. The man's answer, that Christ was a prophet, contained not only a testimony of his being endued with a power of working miracles, but likewise that he had a right to dispense with the strict observation of the sabbath; because a prophet, according to their own traditions, was supposed to be invested with such a power.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 9:17". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-9.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. How desirous the Pharisees were to obscure the glory of this famous miracle which Christ had wrought: in order to which,

1. They re-examine the man, to know what his thoughts were of the person who had done this for him: they judged him to be an impostor and a great sinner: the man declares freely, That he believed him to be a great prophet.

Hence we learn, That there may be, and sometimes is, more true knowledge of Jesus Christ in one poor man, than in a general counsel of learned rabbies. This blind man saw Christ to be a prophet, when the Jewish sanhedrin saw nothing in him but imposture. This man is not of God, says the council: Verily, he is a prophet, says the blind man.

2. They next examine his parents (being unwilling to believe the man himself) Whether he was their son, or not? If so, whether he were born blind? Lord! what obstinate and willful blindness was found in these Pharisees! How do they close their eyes and say, We will not see; What endeavours are here used to smother a miracle, which undeniably proved Christ to be the expected Messias! They examine first the man, then his parents, then the man again; hoping, that being over-awed with fear, they would either deny, or at least conceal, the truth; but the more they strove to darken and obscure the truth; the more conspicuous and evident they made it. Great is truth, and will prevail, how many soever oppose it, and set themselves against it.

Observe next, The wisdom and cautiousness of his parents answer: they expressly own, the blind man was their son; that he was born blind; but for the way of his cure they wave that, possibly because they did not see this cure wrought, and fearing the sentence of excommunication, a decree being passed among the rulers, That whoso confesseth Christ, shall be put out of the synagogue.

Hence learn, 1. That excommunication or separation from the society of the people of God, is an ancient and honourable ordinance in the church of God, and as such to be revered and esteemed.

2. That this ordinance of God has been, and may be, abused by wicked men, and the edge of it turned against Christ himself, and his sincerest members.

3. That the fear of unjust excommunication must not discourage persons from confessing the truth, when called to it. The parents of the blind man durst not confess Christ, for fear that they should be put out of the synagogue.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 9:17". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-9.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

17.] The question is but one, as in E. V., What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened (i.e. for having opened) thine eyes? The stress is on σύ—‘What hast thou to say to it, seeing we are divided on the matter?’ Both parties are anxious to have the man’s own view to corroborate theirs.

προφ., and therefore παρὰ τοῦ θεοῦ.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 9:17". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-9.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 9:17. As there was such a difference of views among those who were assembled, they feel it to be of importance to ascertain the opinion of the man who had been healed. It might lead to further light being thrown on the affair. The subject of λέγουσιν is οἱ φαρισ., neither the hostile among them merely (Apollinarius and many others), nor the well-wishers alone (Chrysostom and his followers).

πάλιν] a repetition of the question after John 9:15.

ὅτι] εἰς ἐκεῖνο, ὅτι; see on John 2:18. Theodore of Mopsuestia well remarks: ὑπὲρ ὧν.

προφήτης] who had shown Himself to be such by this miracle. Comp. John 3:2, John 4:19, John 6:14, al. Thus the faith of the man became clear and confirmed by the controversy of the Pharisees. And he makes confession of what he up to this time believes.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 9:17". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-9.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 9:17. προφήτης, a prophet) i.e. from God, John 9:16, “This man is not from God,” 33; ch. John 1:6, “There was a man sent from God,” etc.; John 3:2, “We know that Thou art a teacher come from God” [Jesus had prayed in undertaking the cure, John 9:31 : and from that circumstance the blind man had come to know the close intimacy subsisting between Jesus and God.—V. g.] It is delightful to observe how faith gradually arises in this man, whilst the Pharisees are contradicting [Teased with the repeated questionings of the men, at last he unlearned the lesson of being bound by mere authority. Thus advantage may be derived even from the perverse ways and humours of others.—V. g.]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 9:17". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-9.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes? What opinion hast thou of this man, who hath opened thine eyes? To make the question perfect, interpreters think, there ought to be this supplement, on the sabbath day. What dost thou think of such a man as this, who would make clay, and apply it to thy cure upon the sabbath day? How can such a act be defended?

The blind man answered,

He is a prophet. It was taken for granted by the Jews, according to their traditions, that at the command of a prophet it was lawful to violate the sabbath; which indeed is no more than, that God hath not, in giving us a law, bound up himself, but he may dispense with his own law. Their prophets had an extraordinary mission from God, and immediately revealed the will of God; so as they looked upon what they said as spoken by God himself. The blind man declareth, that he believed that Christ was a prophet; and being so, his words and actions had an extraordinary warrant, and therefore were not to be judged by ordinary rules.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 9:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-9.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

это пророк Слепой ясно увидел, что Иисус не был просто человеком, а имевшие зрение, но упорные фарисеи были к этой истине духовно слепы (см. ст. 39). В Библии слепота является образом духовной тьмы, т.е. неспособности распознавать Бога и Его истину (2Кор. 4:3-6; Кол. 1:12-14).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 9:17". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-9.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

17.What sayest thou of him, [in view of the matter,] that he hath openedThis shows that there is but one question. And the crooked question brings a straight answer.

A prophet—The man had heard from the readings of the Old Testament (though his own eyes had never seen a letter) that there were prophets of old, who did works by the power of God, and whose words, as from God, were thus divinely authenticated. Nothing less than such a one, even before this spiritual court, he avers, could this restorer of his sight have been. And this firm confessor shows himself prepared for that humble reception of Jesus’s words which he exhibited in John 9:36-38. He is a predestined sheep of Christ; predestined, that is, by predisposition and free volitional purpose before he is by full regeneration. And this confession disconcerts these lords spiritual for the moment. But they fall back upon a pretext; perhaps his parents will admit that he was not born blind.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-9.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘They say therefore to the blind man again, “What do you say about him in view of the fact that he opened your eyes?” And he said, “He is a prophet”.’

They asked the man what he thought about this person who had opened his eyes. His reply was simple, ‘He is a prophet’, a God sent and God empowered man. He knew that his eyes had been opened as he stood before these ‘blind’ men and he revealed at least part of the truth. Ironically the man born blind was seeking to open the eyes of those who claimed to see.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-9.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Faced with having to decide if Jesus was from God or not, the healed man concluded that He was a prophet similar to other miracle-working Old Testament prophets (e.g, 2 Kings 2:19-22; 2 Kings 4:18-44; 2 Kings 5:1-14). This was an advance over his previous description of Jesus as simply "the man called Jesus" ( John 9:11). His faith was growing.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-9.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 9:17. They say therefore unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, because he opened thine eyes? And he said, He is a prophet. The fact is admitted, perhaps honestly, for it will be observed that, when we come to the next verse, we have a new set of questioners, and not simply persons who, having made a concession in the words before us, immediately withdraw it. The word ‘thou’ is emphatic: unable to decide the matter themselves, they seek to draw from the blind man some statement which may enable them more effectually to condemn Jesus. But his answer only deals an unexpected blow.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-9.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 9:17. Differing among themselves, they refer the question to the man, ’ “You, what do you say about Him, on account of His opening your eyes?” The question is not one of fact, but of inference from the fact; the means “in that,” “inasmuch as,” and the Vulgate simply renders “Tu quid dicis de illo, qui aperuit oculos tuos?” Promptly the man replies, .

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 9:17". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-9.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Hebrews gave the name of prophet to all those who were honoured by the Almighty in a particular manner. And it was a maxim amongst them, that a prophet could dispense with the law of the sabbath. (Calmet) --- Do you wish to know what he believed Jesus to be? asks St. Augustine. And falling down, he adored him. Before, he regarded him as a holy man, as a prophet; but he did not adore him until he understood him to be the Son of God; whereas no sooner did he know this, than, falling down, he paid him that sovereign worship which is due to God alone. (Calmet)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 9:17". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

of = concerning. Greek. peri. App-104.

hath opened = opened.

prophet. Compare John 4:18.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 9:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-9.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

They say unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes? He said, He is a prophet.

They say unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes? He said, He is a prophet - rightly viewing the miracle as but a "sign" [ seemeion (Greek #4592)] of His prophetic commission.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-9.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

17. He is a prophet. He is a “man named Jesus” in John 9:11: a “prophet” here; and in John 9:38 the formerly blind man declares his faith in Jesus as Lord!

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 9:17". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-9.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(17) They say unto the blind man again.—The question is not asked by either of the parties, for this must have been noted, but by the assembly generally. They who questioned him in John 9:15, question him again now. They have differed among themselves, and they ask what impression the fact of the miracle had left upon him who was the object of it, with regard to the person of Him who had performed it.

What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes?—Stress is laid on the pronoun. What sayest thou? He ought to know better than any one, seeing that his eyes had been opened and this they admit, while the nature of his witness is uncertain; but immediately that is given they disbelieve the fact of the miracle, and soon reject with scorn him they question now (John 9:34).

The English reader should observe the punctuation here, which rightly makes the question one. It is sometimes read as though it were, “What sayest thou of Him? that He hath opened thine eyes?” It is not, however, the fact which is here questioned, but the opinion of the man, based upon the fact, for the present assumed as true, which is called for.

He is a prophet.—The education of the man has been doing its work, and he is convinced that the power which has healed him is direct from God, and that the person who has exercised it is a messenger from God. His words are uttered in the brevity and calmness of clear conviction, and they are the direct negative to the statement of the Pharisees, “This man is not from God.” (Comp John 3:2; John 4:19; John 6:14.) It is important to note, that even in the language of the ordinary people, the word “prophet” did not mean simply a predictor of events in the future, but one who was as the representative of God. He was not only or chiefly a “fore-teller,” but a “forth-teller,” declaring God’s truth, revealing His will and character, bearing the witness of divine works; but as the future is ever present to the divine counsels, prophecy, in the narrower sense, may be part of the work of the true prophet.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

They say unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes? He said, He is a prophet.
He is
4:19; 6:14; Luke 24:19; Acts 2:22; 3:22-26; 10:38
Reciprocal: Matthew 16:14 - Elias;  Matthew 21:11 - This;  Mark 6:15 - a prophet;  Luke 7:16 - a great;  Luke 9:19 - old

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 9:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-9.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 17. "They say unto the blind man again, What sayest thou of him, that he hath opened thine eyes t He said, He is a prophet."

The Pharisees are the subject of λέγουσι as is shown by the πάλιν, which refers to ver. 15. And this of itself proves that the questioning had a hostile intent: for the Pharisees were, as a mass, hostile. The interrogations everywhere proceeded from enemies. The dissent was only partial, and it is not further referred to. The matter, in spite of the dissentients, took its course. "That he hath opened thine eyes," is equivalent to "What thinkest thou in reference to it? for whom boldest thou him on account of it?" The question touched the fact first, and then the judgment upon the person. The Pharisees hoped that the healed man would give them in this matter a handle for reaching the fact in a circuitous way. If he was not absolutely sure that Jesus had accomplished the act by supernatural divine powers: if he let fall anything about the possibility of secret means and magical arts, they would have had something to use in their purpose. But his brief and plain declaration, "He is a prophet," disconcerted their hopes.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 9:17". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-9.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

17.They say to him who had been blind. The more diligently they inquire, the more impressively does the truth of God appear; for they act as if one were endeavoring to extinguish a strong flame (262) by his breath. Thus, when we see wicked men contrive all that they can to crush the truth of God, we have no reason to be afraid, or to be excessively anxious about the result, for all that they can gain in this way will be to cause its light to burn with greater brightness.

What sayest thou of him? When they ask the blind man what is his opinion, they do so, not because they wish to abide by his judgment, or set any value on it, but because they hope that the man, struck with fear, will reply according to their wish. In this respect the Lord disappoints them; for when a poor man disregards their threatenings, and boldly maintains that Christ is a Prophet, we ought justly to ascribe it to the grace of God; so that this boldness is another miracle. And if he so boldly and freely acknowledged Christ to be a Prophet, though he did not as yet know that the Lord Jesus (263) was the Son of God, how shameful is the treachery of those who, subdued by fear, either deny him, or are silent respecting him, though they know that he sitteth at the right hand of the Father, and that he will come thence to be the Judge of the whole world! Since this blind man did not quench a small spark of knowledge, we ought to endeavor that an open and full confession may blaze forth from the full brightness which has shone into our hearts.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 9:17". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-9.html. 1840-57.