Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Joshua 14:13

So Joshua blessed him and gave Hebron to Caleb the son of Jephunneh for an inheritance.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Benedictions;   Caleb;   Hebron;   Obedience;   Thompson Chain Reference - Blessings;   Blessings-Afflictions;   Caleb;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Anakim, the;   Hittites;   Holy Land;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Hebron;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Anak;   Caleb;   Hebron;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Caleb;   Debir;   Hebron;   Judah, Tribe of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Hebron;   Othniel;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Hebron;   Joshua, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Caleb;   Joshua;   Moses;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Caleb;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Hebron;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Caleb;   Hebron;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Conquest of Canaan;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Caleb;   Joshua (2);   Joshua, Book of;   Judah, Territory of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Anakim;   Giants;   Judah, Tribe of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Joshua blessed him - As the word bless often signifies to speak good or well of or to any person, (see the note on Genesis 2:3;), here it may mean the praise bestowed on Caleb's intrepidity and faithfulness by Joshua, as well as a prayer to God that he might have prosperity in all things; and especially that the Lord might be with him, as himself had expressed in the preceding verse.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/joshua-14.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"And Joshua blessed him; and gave Hebron unto Caleb the son of Jephunneh for an inheritance. Therefore Hebron became the inheritance of Caleb the son of Jephunneh unto this day; because that he wholly followed Jehovah, the God of Israel. Now the name of Hebron beforetime was Kiriath-arba; which Arba was the greatest man among the Anakim. And the land had rest from war."

"And Joshua blessed him ..." (Joshua 14:13). These words show the endorsement by Joshua of all that Caleb had claimed, including a number of things nowhere mentioned in the Pentateuch, indicating, as Plummer said, that Joshua had access to information not even mentioned in the Pentateuch, including such things as the oath that Moses swore in this connection.

"Kiriath-arba ..." "This means `city of four.' It is unlikely that ARBA is a proper name."[24] Behold the wisdom of the critics! Against a fact clearly stated in the Holy Bible, such men offer their opinion instead of what the text says. We will have none of this. Of course, "The Rabbis have translated the place, `the city of four,' telling us that the `four' are Adam, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob who were buried there."[25] Still others suppose `the four' to have been four great giants who captured the city and took possession of it. We are confronted with diverse opinions regarding the Septuagint (LXX) here. Sizoo stated that it reads, "Kiriath-arba the metropolis (or mother city) of the Anakim."[26] Boling tells us that, "Read with LXX, the Hebrew text of the O.T. has, `He was the great man among the Anakim.'"[27] Our own copy of the Septuagint (LXX) reads, "It is the metropolis of the Anakim."[28] Dummelow pointed out that the Septuagint translates a reference to this city in Joshua 15:13 as, "the metropolis of Anak," and another similar reference in Joshua 21:11 as "the metropolis of the sons of Anak," adding that:

"`Metropolis of Anak' may be the true sense."[29] On such evidence as this, therefore, we are bound to agree with our translators of the ASV and to reject the fanciful substitutes often offered.

"Arba, the greatest man among the Anakim ..." "This is the literal meaning of the Hebrew text here; he was the renowned ancestor of the tribe and the founder of its greatness."[30]

"Unto this day ..." This is precisely the kind of etiological expression that critics seize upon in order to make it the grounds of all kinds of irresponsible allegations. Yes, as Woudstra said, "All history has an etiological element in it, seeking to preserve those memories of the past that make the present meaningful. This kind of etiology is squarely rooted in fact, and not in fictitious compositions invented by the author."[31] "Unto this day," "to this day," etc. "are actually meant as the confirmation of the veracity of the account."[32] In this usage, the words are absolutely idiomatic. They are not a typical expression introducing an etiological tale. It is possible of course, that the words were added in days following the death of Joshua by some inspired author such as Samuel, Ezra, Nehemiah, or others unknown to us. They have no bearing whatever upon allegations of a late date for Joshua.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/joshua-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Joshua blessed him,.... By granting him his request, congratulating him upon it, and praying for and wishing him success in his attempt to drive out the giants, and possess their country:

and gave unto Caleb, the son of Jephunneh, Hebron for an inheritance; being satisfied of the justness of his suit, of its being the will of God, and the order of Moses, that he should have this for an inheritance, which he had heard himself, had knowledge of, and well remembered: this is to be understood not of the city of Hebron itself, for that was given to the Levites, and was a city of refuge, but the country round about in the fields and villages annexed to it, as appears from Joshua 21:12.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/joshua-14.html. 1999.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

Then Joshua blessed Caleb, i.e., implored the blessing of God upon his undertaking, and gave him Hebron for an inheritance. Hebron is mentioned as the chief city, to which the surrounding country belonged; for Caleb had asked for the mountains (Joshua 14:9), i.e., the mountainous country with and around Hebron, which included, for example, the fortified town of Debir also (Joshua 15:15).

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The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
Bibliographical Information
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/joshua-14.html. 1854-1889.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

How lovely doth Joshua appear in this place. There was no rival-ship, no jealousy between those faithful servants of the Lord. Such should be, and such would be, the harmony amidst kindred souls, were grace to reign in the heart. See Moses ' conduct upon a similar occasion: Numbers 11:29. But while admiring the grace in Joshua which the Lord had given him, let us look at him in yet a more interesting point of view, and see him as the type of Jesus blessing his people. Joshua blessed Caleb, and no doubt the less is blessed of the better. Dearest Jesus! do thou bless me, and then my God and Father's promise of bringing his people to his holy mountain, will be a sanctified mercy indeed. Ephesians 1:3.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/joshua-14.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Joshua blessed him, and gave unto Caleb the son of Jephunneh Hebron for an inheritance.

Blessed him — Prayed to God to bless and help him according to his own desire.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/joshua-14.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Joshua 14:13 And Joshua blessed him, and gave unto Caleb the son of Jephunneh Hebron for an inheritance.

Ver. 13. And Joshua blessed him.] He approved of his petition: he did not blame him for being too hasty, nor bid him stay till himself were first served; but granted him Hebron, helped him to gain it, [Joshua 10:37] and wished him much joy of it. Some think that Caleb afterwards yielded up Hebron to the Levites, and the rest of the tribes did the like, as glad of their company, by whom they might learn the ways of holiness, that lead to happiness.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/joshua-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 13. And Joshua blessed him Granted him the boon he desired, acknowledged his right to the country of Hebron, consented to his making a conquest of it, and entreated the Lord to favour him in his undertaking.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/joshua-14.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Joshua either,

1. Prayed to God to bless and help him according to his own desire. Or,

2. Acknowledged his praiseworthy carriage in the matter of the spies, and the reasonableness of his request. Or,

3. Consented to his desire, and, as it follows, gave it to him; as God’s blessing is oft put for his actual conferring of favours upon men.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/joshua-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13.And Joshua blessed him — Bade him God speed in his warfare, and invoked the help of Jehovah to attend him.

And gave unto Caleb — Joshua could not resist an appeal from his venerable associate spy, based on facts of which he himself had been cognizant.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/joshua-14.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Joshua 14:13. Joshua blessed him — Commended his bravery, applauded and granted his request, and prayed to God to bless and help him according to his own desire. Joshua was both a prince and a prophet, and on both accounts it was proper for him to give Caleb his blessing.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/joshua-14.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Blessed him, wishing him all success. --- Gave him. Some think that Josue himself attacked the giants of that country with all the forces, as it is mentioned by anticipation, chap. x. 28. But there seems to be no need of this, as Caleb might attack them a second time with his own family and the assistance of the tribe of Juda, after they had seized those places again, while Josue was in the north. Hebron was granted to him without drawing lots. When he was besieging Cariath Sepher, he promised his daughter to the person who should first enter; and Othoniel, his brother, or nephew, obtained her in marriage, chap. xv. 17., and Judges i. 10. It seems, therefore, that this family carried on this war, as the Fabii did at Rome, without the interference of the commonwealth, though Grotius asserts the contrary. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/joshua-14.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Joshua blessed him, and gave unto Caleb the son of Jephunneh Hebron for an inheritance.

Joshua blessed him, and gave ... Hebron. Joshua, who was fully cognizant of the whole circumstances, not only admitted the claim, but in a public and earnest manner prayed for the divine blessing to succour the efforts of Caleb in driving out the idolatrous occupiers.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/joshua-14.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Joshua blessed him, and gave unto Caleb the son of Jephunneh Hebron for an inheritance.
blessed
22:6; Genesis 47:7,10; 1 Samuel 1:17; Song of Solomon 6:9
gave unto
10:36,37; 15:13; 21:11,12; Judges 1:20; 1 Chronicles 6:55,56
Reciprocal: Genesis 13:18 - Hebron;  Genesis 27:4 - that my;  Genesis 37:14 - Hebron;  Numbers 13:22 - Hebron;  1 Samuel 30:14 - Caleb;  1 Samuel 30:31 - Hebron;  2 Chronicles 27:4 - the mountains

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/joshua-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

13.And Joshua blessed him, etc He prayed thus earnestly to show the delight he felt. For it was expedient by way of example to extol his valor, by which others might be incited to surmount all their fears. For it was just as if he had gained an eminence from which he could look down upon the giants. The blessing of Caleb, therefore, includes in it praise which may have the effect of an exhortation to the people. In the end of the chapter it is said, that the name of Hebron was Ciriath-Arba, (Kirjath-Arba.) Here it is to be observed, that it is not the mountain itself that is meant, but the principal city, of which there is frequent mention in Scripture. It is said to have received the surname from a giant famous for his stature. And this refutes the imagination of those expositors who insist that it was so called from having been the burial-place of four patriarchs — Adam, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

It is plain that Caleb, in making the request, had not been looking to present ease or private advantage, since he does not aspire to the place that had been given him till many years after. Wherefore it was no less the interest of the whole people than of one private family, that that which as yet depended on the incomprehensible grace of God, and was treasured up merely in hope, should be bestowed as a special favor. A grant which could not take effect without a wonderful manifestation of divine agency could scarcely be invidious.

A question, however, arises. Since Hebron not only became the portion of the Levites, but was one of the cities of refuge, how could the grant stand good? If we say that Caleb was contented with other towns, and resigned his right to the Levites, it is obvious that the difficulty is not solved, because Caleb is distinctly appointed owner of that city. But if we reflect that the right of dwelling in the cities was all that was granted to the Levites, there will be no inconsistency. Meanwhile, no small praise is due to the moderation of Caleb, who, in a locality made his own by extraordinary privilege, did not refuse an hospitable reception to the Levites. (143)

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Joshua 14:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/joshua-14.html. 1840-57.