Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:21

At that very time He rejoiced greatly in the Holy Spirit, and said, "I praise You, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that You have hidden these things from the wise and intelligent and have revealed them to infants. Yes, Father, for this way was well-pleasing in Your sight.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Agency;   Babes;   God;   Humility;   Jesus, the Christ;   Minister, Christian;   Preaching;   Wisdom;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Joy;   Joy-Sorrow;   The Topic Concordance - Hiding;   Resurrection;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Life, Spiritual;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Mystery;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jesus christ;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Holy Spirit;   Thankfulness, Thanksgiving;   World;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Babe;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Christ, Christology;   Disciples;   Luke, Gospel of;   Prayer;   Son of God;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the New Testament;   Incarnation;   Joy;   Martha;   Mary;   Mystery;   Proverb;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Babe;   Candlestick;   Character;   Children;   Complacency;   Consciousness;   Devotion;   Discourse;   Education (2);   Endurance;   Enthusiasm;   Holy Spirit (2);   Hopefulness ;   Humanity of Christ;   Ideas (Leading);   Infancy;   Joy;   Joy (2);   Kenosis;   Lord (2);   Mental Characteristics;   Mystery ;   Obscurity;   Poet;   Prudence;   Publishing ;   Quotations (2);   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Self-Control;   Sorrow, Man of Sorrows;   Teaching of Jesus;   Thanksgiving ;   Trinity (2);   Understanding;   Winter ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Abba;   Babe;   Communion;   Holy Spirit;   Humility;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Joy;   Salvation;   Thank;   Wisdom;   Wisdom of God;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for May 29;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Rejoiced in spirit - Was truly and heartily joyous: felt an inward triumph. But τῳ πνευματι, τῳ ἁγιῳ, the Holy Spirit, is the reading here of BCDKL, six others; the three Syriac, later Persic, Coptic, Ethiopic, Armenian, Vulgate, all the Itala except one, and Augustin and Bede. These might be considered sufficient authority to admit the word into the text.

I thank thee - Bishop Pearce justly observes, the thanks are meant to be given to God for revealing them to babes, not for hiding them from the others. See on Matthew 11:25; (note).

Thou hast hid - That is, thou hast not revealed them to the scribes and Pharisees, who idolized their own wisdom; but thou hast revealed them to the simple and humble of heart.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

In that same hour he rejoiced in the Holy Spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou didst hide these things from the wise and understanding, and didst reveal them unto babes: yea, Father; for so it was well-pleasing in thy sight.

THE REJOICING OF CHRIST

Significantly, this rejoicing of Jesus was "in the Holy Spirit," indicating that even his emotions were in harmony with that Spirit which, without measure, dwelt in him. The true joy of the redeemed issues automatically in the outpouring of prayers of thanksgiving to the Father.

Hide these things ... God did not hide capriciously his revelation from the wise and understanding of earth; for they received exactly the same revelation as the "babes," with this difference: "The revelation to those with the wrong attitude, when they persistently rejected it, was taken away from them, and they were permanently confirmed in their spiritual blindness."[19]

ENDNOTE:

[19] Norval Geldenhuys, op. cit., p. 308.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

In that hour Jesus rejoiced in Spirit,.... In his human soul: his heart was filled with joy, not so much at the success of the seventy disciples, and the subjection of the devils to them, as in the view he had of the spread of the Gospel, and of the revelation and application of the truths of it to multitudes of mean and despicable persons, while it was rejected by the wise and learned; and particularly at the sovereign and distinguishing grace of God towards the elect, whose names are written in heaven; upon the mention of which his soul was so affected, that he broke out in, an exulting strain, into thanksgivings to God, in the following manner,

and said, I thank thee, O Father,.... In three ancient copies of Beza's, and in the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Ethiopic versions it is read, "in the Holy Spirit"; and the Persic version reads, "he spake, or confabulated with the Holy Spirit": but the former reading and sense are best. See Gill on Matthew 11:25, Matthew 11:26

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

5 In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the h wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

(5) The Church is contemptible, if we consider its outward appearance, but the wisdom of God is most marvellous in it.

(h) Of this world.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-10.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

In that same hour (εν αυτηι τηι ωραιen autēi tēi hōrāi). Literally, “at the hour itself,” almost a demonstrative use of αυτοςautos (Robertson, Grammar, p. 686) and in Luke alone in the N.T. (Luke 2:38; Luke 10:21; Luke 12:12; Luke 20:19). Matthew 11:25 uses the demonstrative here, “at that time” (εν εκεινωι τωι καιρωιen ekeinōi tōi kairōi).

Rejoiced in the Holy Spirit (ηγαλλιασατο τωι πνευματι τωι αγιωιēgalliasato tōi pneumati tōi hagiōi). First aorist middle of the late verb αγαλλιαωagalliaō for αγαλλωagallō to exult. Always in the middle in the N.T. save Luke 1:47 in Mary‘s Magnificat. This holy joy of Jesus was directly due to the Holy Spirit. It is joy in the work of his followers, their victories over Satan, and is akin to the joy felt by Jesus in John 4:32-38 when the vision of the harvest of the world stirred his heart. The rest of this verse is precisely like Matthew 11:25., a peculiarly Johannine passage in Matthew and Luke, but not in Mark, and so from Q (the Logia of Jesus). It has disturbed critics who are unwilling to admit the Johannine style and type of teaching as genuine, but here it is. See note on Matthew 11:25 for discussion. “That God had proved his independence of the human intellect is a matter for thankfulness. Intellectual gifts, so far from being necessary, are often a hindrance” (Plummer).

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

The best texts omit Jesus.

Rejoiced

See on 1 Peter 1:6.

In spirit

The best texts add τῷ ἁγίῳ , the holy, and render in the Holy Spirit.

I thank

See on Matthew 11:25. From this point to Luke 10:25, compare Matthew 11:25-27, and Matthew 13:16, Matthew 13:17.

Prudent

See on Matthew 11:25.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

Lord of heaven and earth — In both of which thy kingdom stands, and that of Satan is destroyed.

That thou hast hid these things — He rejoiced not in the destruction of the wise and prudent, but in the display of the riches of God's grace to others, in such a manner as reserves to Him the entire glory of our salvation, and hides pride from man. Matthew 11:25.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-10.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

In that same hour he rejoiced in the Holy Spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou didst hide these things from the wise and understanding1, and didst reveal them unto babes: yea, Father; for so it was well-pleasing in thy sight.

  1. That thou didst hide these things from the wise and understanding,
  2. and didst reveal them unto babes. See .

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE JOY OF THE LORD

‘In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit.’

Luke 10:21

What were the grounds of our Lord’s joy?

I. That the Father had passed by the worldly-wise and prudent, and had revealed the glorious things of the Gospel to those whom the world regarded as ‘babes’ in intellect, in power, and in knowledge. These ‘babes,’ then, are not children of tender years, but children in docility, humility, and simplicity; those who not only ‘from a child have known the Holy Scriptures,’ but who, as a child, have received them into their understandings and hearts. Now let us pause and press the inquiry, Has the Gospel been revealed to you? Has it pleased God to reveal His Son in you?

II. That the sovereignty of God was thus displayed.—Seeing that the Gospel, hidden from the wise, was revealed unto babes, and resolving this into the sovereign will and discriminating grace of God, He rejoiced in spirit, and said, ‘Even so, Father, for so it seemeth good in Thy sight.’ And here it is we must find a solution to what would else, in our poor ken, appear partial, unjust, and inexplicable in God’s testimony of His grace—why the Gospel should be a hidden thing to one, a revealed thing to another; why one should be called and another left, we can only explain and understand in the exercise of that Divine sovereignty which belongs essentially to God. ‘He giveth no account of any of His matters.’ Who art thou, then, O man, that repliest against God? Shall not He, the Judge of all the earth, do right? Has He not a right to do with His own as He will? And in the merciful decisions of His grace, and in the awful decisions of His providence, and in the yet more tremendous decisions of His judgment, He, the most upright, will be guided by the eternal principles of righteousness, rectitude, and wisdom. Beware, then, how you quarrel with God’s sovereignty!

Rev. Dr. Octavius Winslow.

Illustration

‘It is a frequently-quoted remark of one of the Fathers that Christ was often seen to weep, but never once to smile. We doubt both the correctness and the wisdom of the statement. Our Lord was a man of joy as well as a man of sorrow. He must, in the fathomless depths of His holy soul, have been as intimately acquainted with gladness as with grief—with the emotion of joy as with the feeling of sorrow. And can we picture Him to our mind thus rejoicing in spirit, the oil of gladness poured upon Him without measure, and insinuating itself into the innermost depths of His being, without a gleam, a smile of joy lighting up that benign, placid, and expressive countenance which more than all others must have been a perfect index of the soul’s hidden, varied, and profound emotions? Impossible! A portrait of Christ with nought but shadows—shadows of grief and sorrow darkening the entire picture—would be wanting in one of its most essential and life-like features.’

(SECOND OUTLINE)

THE JOY OF THE LORD’S PEOPLE

If Christ was a man of joy we, who are Christ’s, should be joyful too. And yet how much this Christian grace is overlooked!

Consider some grounds of the Christian’s joy.

I. His possession of Christ.

II. The work of Christ for him.

III. The coming of the Lord to receive him unto Himself.

Rev. Dr. Octavius Winslow.

Illustration

(1) ‘A Persian allegory tells how there was a beautiful fragrance about some common clay. When asked the reason the clay replied, “I have been near where a rose tree grows.” So all who come near Christ are near the Fountain of Joy.’

(2) ‘Then may the life, which now on earth I live,

Be spent for Him, who His for me did give.

Oh! make me, Lord, in all I will and do,

Ever to keep Thy glory in my view.

And when my course is run, and fought the fight.

Life’s struggles o’er, and faith is changed to sight,

Then all triumphant I shall ever be,

Safe in Thy Home, for I belong to Thee.

“Fullness of joy” with all Thy ransom’d there,

In Thy loved presence I shall ever share;

With them I’ll sing the love that made us free,

The grace that taught us we belonged to Thee.’

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-10.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

21 In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

Ver. 21. I thank thee, O Father, &c.] With this prayer the Anabaptists of Germany usually began their sermons, thinking thereby to excuse their lack of learning. (Scultet. Annal.) And then protested that they would deliver nothing but what was revealed to them from above.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 10:21

Both in substance and in circumstances these words are unusually profound, even among the profound sayings of our Lord.

I. First, they mark the almost solitary exception to the pervading gravity, not to say sorrowfulness, of His demeanour and life. In prophetic anticipation He looked onward to the final triumph, when the processes of His salvation should be completed, when the moral influences of His Cross should subdue men's hearts, and He, the Crucified, should "draw all men unto Him." And to the spiritual Jesus there was in this an unutterable satisfaction. Breakings in of millennial glory would irradiate His sorrow, so touchingly indicated by this one solitary record of His joy.

II. The occasion which elicited this expression of spiritual joy from our Lord is also very remarkable. The lower adulterated joy of the Seventy suggests to our Lord a higher and purer spiritual joy. Their miracle over the external phenomena of demoniacal possession suggests afresh to their Lord His spiritual triumph over the moral power of evil. "You," He says, "see the devils subject to you: I see Satan as lightning fall from heaven." "In that hour" He began to see the "travail of His soul." He first realised the spiritual satisfaction that was to comfort and sustain Him amid outward discouragement, rejection, and infliction.

III. It is worthy of notice that our Lord's most piercing spiritual visions, and His most profound words of spiritual wisdom occur in connection with His acts of devotion. More than once our Lord permitted His disciples to overhear His communings with His Father. His prayers are ever the utterances of His greatest thoughts, of His deepest feelings.

IV. The sentiment itself is one of the many expressions of the great Christian paradox—that the kingdom of God is accessible, not to men of great intellectual power, as such, but to men of childlike hearts.

H. Allon, Penny Pulpit, new series, No. 326.

The Simplicity of Mystery.

I. "In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit." What hour was that? When He saw, humanly speaking, a glimpse of God's method of unfolding His governmental purposes, and His beneficent plans and designs. It is always so. Now and then God seems to lift the veil, and we are allowed for one moment to see what He is doing, and how He is doing things; and I have never yet had one of these revelation glimpses without saying afterwards, "This is Divine; this is sufficient; this is infinite in beauty. God is doing all things well."

II. Religion, as propounded to us by Jesus Christ, is not a riddle to be solved by the intellectually great. It is a revelation to the heart; it is a word spoken to sin; it is a Gospel breathed upon sorrow; it is a word of liberty delivered to those that are bound, a subtle sympathy, something not to be named in high-sounding phrases, or to be wrought out in pomp of words. "And hast revealed them unto babes." It will be found that simplicity itself is the chief mystery of God. The fact of the matter is, that things are so simple that we will not believe them. We look for mystery, and therefore we miss the thing that is close at hand. The notion of the day would seem to be the notion of intellectual power, intellectual efficiency, intellectual culture. If we are babes what may we expect from the world? Ridicule. Let us understand the terms under which we go into this kingdom, and that is, that we return to babyhood. The greater the man, the greater the simplicity; the greater his acquisitions, the more beautiful his modesty; the more wonderful his power and influence, the greater his readiness to consider, and oblige, and do good. From the greatest expect the best; from the master more than from the servant; from the disciple expect rudeness and rejection; from the Master "Forbid them not, let them come." As thou dost increase in gentleness, thou wilt increase in modesty, and the increase of thy manfulness and valour shall be an increase of gentleness, and thou shalt find thy highest joys in succouring many, in blessing all.

Parker, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xiii., p. 72.


References: Luke 10:21.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. vii., p. 265; Ibid., vol. xi., p. 206; Preacher's Monthly, vol. viii., p. 222; Spurgeon, Evening by Evening, p. 85. Luke 10:21, Luke 10:22.—Ibid., Sermons, vol. xxvi., No. 1,571; W. Wilson, Christ setting His Face to go to Jerusalem, p. 421. Luke 10:22.—W. Dorling, Christian World Pulpit, vol. ix., p. 142.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-10.html.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here we find our Saviour glorifying his Father, and magnifying himself.

1. He glorifies his Father for the wise and free dispensation of his gospel grace to the meanest and most ignorant persons, while the great and learned men of the world undervalued and despises it: I thank thee, Father, that thou hast revealed these things to babes.

Learn hence,

1. That until God reveals himself, his nature and will, no man can know either what he is, or what he requires: Thou hast revealed.

2. That the wise and knowing men in the world have in all ages despised the mysteries of the gospel, and having therefore been judicially blinded by God: Thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent.

3. That the most ignorant, if humble, and desirous of spiritual illumination, are in the readiest disposition to receive and embrace the gospel revelation: Thou hast revealed them unto babes.

4. That this is not more pleasing to Christ than it is the pleasure of his Father: Even so, Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight.

Observe, 2. Our Saviour magnifies himself.

1. His authority and commission: All things are delivered unto me; that is, all power is committed to me as mediator from God the Father.

2. His office to reveal his Father's will to a lost world: No man knoweth the father, but the Son, or the Son but the Father; that is, no man knows their essence and nature, their will and pleasure, their counsel and consent, their mutual compact and agreement between themselves, for saving a lost world, but only themselves, and those to whom they have revealed it.

Learn thence, that all saving knowledge of God is in, by, and through Christ; he, as the great prophet of his chruch, reveals unto us the mind and will of God for our salvation: None knoweth but he to whom the Son revealeth.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-10.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

21.] The words τῷ ἁγίῳ cannot well be excluded from the text; the expression as thus standing, forms an ἅπαξ λεγ., but is agreeable to the analogy of Scripture: cf. Romans 1:4; Hebrews 9:14; 1 Peter 3:18; see also Romans 14:17; 1 Thessalonians 1:6. The ascription of praise, and the verses following, are here in the very closest connexion, and it is perfectly unimaginable that they should have been inserted in this place arbitrarily. The same has been said of their occurrence in Matthew 11:25; and, from no love of harmonizing or escaping difficulties, but from a deep feeling of the inner spirit of both discourses, I am convinced that our Lord did utter, on the two separate occasions, these weighty words; and I find in them a most instructive instance of the way in which such central sayings were repeated by Him. It was not a rejoicing before (in Matt.), but a confession: compare the whole discourse and notes.

That the introductory words ἐν αὐτῇ τ. ὥρᾳ, = ἐν ἐκ. τῷ καιρῷ, may have been introduced from one passage into the other, and perhaps by some one who imagined them the same, I would willingly grant, if needful; not that, in the presence of such truths, such a trifle is worth mention, but that the shallow school of modern critics do mention, and rest upon such. On Luke 10:21-22, see notes on Matthew 11:25-27, observing here the gradual narrowing of the circle to which our Lord addresses himself, Luke 10:22, στραφ. πρ. τ. μ.,—then Luke 10:23 the same, with κατʼ ἰδίαν added.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-10.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1514

THE GOSPEL REVEALED TO BABES

Luke 10:21. In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

DEEP and mysterious are the ways of God, and “as far above our thoughts and ways, as the heavens are above the earth.”But the more they are contemplated, the more will they approve themselves to to us; even where they are most inscrutable, and where the heart of the natural man would be most ready to rise against them, a humble and pious mind will find abundant cause both for submission and joy. Of our blessed Lord we are often told, that he groaned in spirit: for indeed he was altogether “a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief,” as his daily and hourly companion: but on one occasion it is said, that “he rejoiced in spirit;” and it was in an hour when he had been particularly contemplating the dispensations of his Father in relation to his Gospel. To the proud indeed this would be a subject of complaint and murmuring; but to the humble it was a proper ground of gratitude and thanksgiving. This is evident from the words before us; for the fuller understanding of which I will shew,

1. The conduct of God in relation to his Gospel—

Two things are here specified:

1. “He has hid it from the wise and prudent”—

[By “the wise and prudent” we are not to understand those that are truly wise and truly prudent, but those who are “wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight,” who are just objects of God’s heavy displeasure [Note: Isaiah 5:21. with Romans 12:16.].

From these “God has hid” his Gospel. Not but that they have the same access to it as others, and might attain to the knowledge of it as well as others, if only they would seek it in a becoming spirit: for God does nothing either to withhold it from them, or to incapacitate them for the perception of it. God is said to do what he permits to be done [Note: Compare 2 Samuel 24:1. with 1 Chronicles 21:1.]: and it is not by any active exertion of his which man cannot withstand, but by such means only as leave men altogether responsible for their own blindness, that he hides his truth from the minds of any.

The Gospel is hid from this description of persons, partly, through the very constitution of the Gospel itself: for it reveals such a way of salvation as a proud conceited mind cannot receive: “it is foolishness to the natural man; neither can he receive it, because it is spiritually discerned [Note: 1 Corinthians 2:14.].” The doctrine of the cross is to the Jews a “stumbling-block, and to the Greeks foolishness [Note: 1 Corinthians 1:23.].” It was foretold by the Prophet Isaiah, that the same person who should “be for a sanctuary to his believing people, should be for a stone of stumbling and for a rock of offence to both the houses of Israel, for a gin and for a snare to the inhabitants of Jerusalem, many amongst whom should stumble, and fall, and be broken, and be snared, and be taken [Note: Isaiah 8:14-15.].” And to the same effect was it said of Jesus, by the holy man who took him in his arms, that “he was set for the fall, as well as for the rising, of many in Israel, and for a sign that should be spoken against, that the thoughts of many hearts might be revealed [Note: Luke 2:34-35.].”

It is yet further hid from them through the agency of Satan, to whom the blindness of unbelievers is especially ascribed, and who labours incessantly to prevent “the light of the glorious Gospel of Christ, who is the image of God, from shining unto them [Note: 2 Corinthians 4:4.].”

Doubtless it is also still further hid from them through their being given up by God to judicial blindness. “God’s Spirit will not always strive with man [Note: Genesis 6:3.].” After having been long resisted, he will cease to “work upon their minds [Note: 1 Thessalonians 5:19.]:” they will then be given up to believe their own delusions [Note: 2 Thessalonians 2:11], and to be taken in their own craftiness; and all “their wisdom and prudence will be brought to nought [Note: 1 Corinthians 1:19; 1 Corinthians 3:19.].” In this way vast multitudes have been blinded in former ages [Note: Romans 9:7-8.], and are blinded at this very hour.]

2. But “it is revealed unto babes”—

[The term, “babes,” includes not only those who are weak in respect of intellectual attainments, but those also, who, though of vigorous and cultivated minds, are sensible of their inability to discern spiritual truths without having first a spiritual discernment imparted to them.

To these the Gospel is revealed; and they have such a perception of it as brings peace into their souls, and holiness into their hearts and lives. Of course, we must not suppose that the mere circumstance of any person’s being weak in understanding will procure for him this blessing: but if he seek this blessing in God’s appointed way, the circumstance of his being of weak understanding shall not preclude him from the benefit. And in this respect persons of this description have an advantage, which is, that they are more easily convinced of their need of Divine teaching than persons of learning and refinement are; and are thereby more easily induced to seek of God the teaching of his good Spirit: and hence it is that many of them attain divine knowledge, whilst from the great mass of others it is hid.

That this preference is shewn to them is evident, both from the records of God’s word and from daily observation. Whom did our blessed Saviour choose for his Apostles? Not the learned of the Scribes and Pharisees, but a few poor fishermen. To the proud he spoke in parables; which afterwards to his child-like Disciples he explained; saying to them, “Unto you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to others in parables; that seeing, they might not see, and hearing, they might not understand [Note: Luke 8:10.]:” and hence of the Rulers and of the Pharisees it is asked, “Have any of them believed in him [Note: John 7:48.]?” In like manner the Apostles themselves found little success among the great and learned: “Not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble were called: but God chose the foolish things of the world to confound the wise, and the weak things to confound the mighty, yea, and things base and despised to bring to nought those which were high in worldly estimation, that no flesh might glory in his presence [Note: 1 Corinthians 1:27-29.].” And is it not so at this day? Who are the people that experience the enlightening, comforting, and transforming efficacy of the Gospel now? Are they the rich, and the great, and the learned? Would to God they were! But it is not so: it is to “babes, and not to the wise and prudent, that the Gospel is revealed” at this hour, as well as in former days: the Gospel has still the same stamp and character upon it as ever, in that “it is preached chiefly, if not exclusively, to the poor [Note: Matthew 11:5.],” and that “the common people hear it gladly [Note: Mark 12:37.].”]

That the Divine conduct in this respect may not be an offence unto us, let us consider,

II. The dispositions with which it should be contemplated by us—

We should be duly sensible that this is indeed the conduct of God in relation to his Gospel: and we should evince,

1. Our submission to it, as an act of sovereignty—

[Certainly in this matter God acts as a sovereign, who has a right to dispense his blessings to whomsoever he will: “it is even so, Father, for so it seemeth good in thy sight.” God might have revealed his Gospel to all, or hid it from all, if it had pleased him; and none would have had any right to complain. As well might the fallen angels complain that man alone had a Redeemer provided for him, as any child of man complain, that he has derived less advantage from the Gospel than another. Had any other of Paul’s hearers reason to complain, because “the Lord opened Lydia’s heart to attend to the things that were spoken by him?” Assuredly not: God’s grace is his own; and he may dispense it as he pleases, according to his own sovereign will and pleasure [Note: Ephesians 1:5. Philippians 2:13.]. He himself asks, “Is it not lawful for me to do what I will with mine own?” and if we claim such a right, much more may He, who is, as Jesus calls him, “Lord of heaven and earth,” and who consequently may dispose both of heaven and earth according to his will, and “without giving to us an account of any of his matters [Note: Job 33:13.].” When therefore we behold this, shall we presume to strive with God, or to say unto him, ‘What doest thou?’ Shall the clay arraign the conduct of the potter, or “the vessel say to him that formed it, Why hast thou made me thus [Note: Romans 9:20-21.]?” “He that reproveth God, let him answer it [Note: Job 40:2.].”

Many, who see that God does indeed dispense his blessings according to his own good pleasure and the inscrutable counsel of his own will, endeavour to get rid of the notion of his sovereignty by asserting, that God has respect to some goodness in man which he has foreseen; and that he regulates his dispensations in accordance with some worthiness which he knows will at a future period appear in the objects of his choice, bestowing his favours on those who he knows will make a good use of them, and withholding them from those only who he foresees would abuse them. But, if this be so, how shall we understand those declarations of our Lord both in the preceding and following context? He turned him, we are told, to his Disciples, and said privately, “Blessed are the eyes which see the things that ye see: for I tell you that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them, and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them [Note: ver. 23, 24.].” In this place the sovereign grace of God in the disposal of his gifts is clearly asserted. But you may say, ‘True; God gave to some what he withheld from others: but he gave to those who he knew would duly improve his gifts: and the persons from whom he withheld them, were involved in no responsibility on account of them. In order to prove the doctrine which has been insisted on, you must shew me, that God has bestowed the means of salvation on those who would not improve them, and withheld them from those who would have improved them: shew me this, and I grant that the point is established beyond a doubt. Look then at what our Lord asserts in the context respecting Tyre and Sidon, and Bethsaida and Chorazin. To these latter were means of conviction afforded, which were withheld from the former. Were these latter better than the former? Quite the reverse: had our Saviour’s miracles been wrought in Tyre and Sidon, they would long ago have repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes; but when done in Capernaum, they had no other effect than thrusting her down the deeper into hell [Note: ver. 13–15.]. Now all this must have been foreknown to God, else Jesus could not so positively have asserted it: yet here is evidence, that God withheld from some the very means which they would have duly improved, and imparted to others those very same means which he knew they would abuse to their own more aggravated condemnation. What shall we say then to these things? God himself tells us what to say: “Be still, and know that I am God [Note: Psalms 46:10.],” who “have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and have compassion on whom I will have compassion [Note: Romans 9:15; Romans 9:18.].”]

2. Our gratitude for it as an act of mercy—

[Suppose that the Gospel were to be understood only as the deeper sciences are, by men of erudition and learning, in what a deplorable condition would the poor be! They have no time for laborious investigations, nor any of the endowments necessary for philosophical researches. They therefore could have no hope of ever attaining the knowledge of salvation. From absolute necessity their days must be consumed in making provision for the body: and unless they were so occupied, the whole world must be in a state of stagnation and want. But God has shewn no such partiality for the rich as to confine the knowledge of his Gospel to them. Earthly comforts indeed he has given in richer abundance to them; but spiritual blessings he has rather reserved for the poor: as St. James hath said; “Hath not God chosen the poor of this world, rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom which he hath promised to them that love him [Note: James 2:5.].” Thus, where most there seems to have been an inequality in his dispensations, he has shewn an impartiality, making up to the one in spiritual blessings what he has withheld in temporal; and giving advantages in reference to eternity to those who have the less favourable lot in respect of the things of time and sense.

And is not this a ground, a just ground, of joy? Who, that sees what privations are often experienced by the poor, must not rejoice to be informed, that, taking both worlds into the account, there is a preponderance in their favour? Our blessed Lord rejoiced in this; yea, and leaped for joy [Note: ἠγαλλιάσατο.]: and we also, if our minds be constituted like his, shall from our inmost souls contemplate it with gratitude and thanksgiving.]

Let us learn then,

1. Rightly to appreciate divine knowledge—

[We would on no account utter a word that should detract from the excellence of human knowledge. We readily allow that learning does elevate and expand the mind, so as to raise its possessor far above his fellows in many respects: but when compared with spiritual knowledge, it is a poor, and low, and grovelling attainment. St. Paul was excelled by none of his contemporaries in mental attainments: yet, valuable as he once esteemed them, he, when truly converted to God, said, “What things were gain to me, those I count but loss for Christ; yea, doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord [Note: Philippians 3:7-8.].” And such must be your estimate also of this knowledge; for it is this only that will render us truly happy, either in this world or in that which is to come — — —]

2. To seek it in God’s appointed way—

[Human sciences are to be attained by study; but the knowledge of the Gospel must be gained by prayer. In the words immediately following my text, our Lord says, “No man knoweth who the Son is, but the Father; or who the Father is, but the Son, and he to whom the Son shall reveal him.” Know ye then that, though the study of the Holy Scriptures is necessary, it is not sufficient: for in the same place where you are told to “seek for wisdom as for hid treasures,” you are told to “lift up your voice, and to cry unto God for it; for that it is God alone who gives it [Note: Proverbs 2:1; Proverbs 2:6.].” Meditation and prayer must go hand in hand: and if you will seek for knowledge in this way, though you be but a babe, you shall attain it; and, though you be a mere “fool in all other respects, you shall not err therein [Note: Isaiah 35:8.]” — — —]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/luke-10.html. 1832.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(21) In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

I desire to refer the Reader for my observations on this verse to Matthew 11:25-26.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/luke-10.html. 1828.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:21. ἠγαλλιάσατο, exulted) The crowning point of the fruits of Christ’s office was reached at that time. He Himself rejoiced in the joy of His disciples described in Luke 10:20, But rejoice, etc.— κύριε τοῦ οὐρανοῦ καὶ τῆς γῆς, Lord of heaven and earth) Satan is cast out from heaven and earth: the kingdom of God stands in heaven and on earth.—[ νηπίοις, babes) Such were the Seventy, and those who had received their testimony.—V. g.]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 21,22. See Poole on "Matthew 11:25", and following verses to, Matthew 11:27, where we met with these words of our Saviour.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:21". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

21.In that hour—At the season of that transaction.

Father, Lord of heaven and earth—For it was from God the Father Almighty, as above stated, that the omens of triumph were given, both to the Seventy and to the human spirit of the blessed Jesus.

Rejoiced in spirit—Rather triumphed or exulted in spirit. The revelations of the hour gave to him his joy and triumph, as well as to the Seventy theirs.

From the wise and prudent— From not only the statesman, the general, and the prince, but from the rabbi, the priest, and the pontiff; from Herod, Caiaphas, and Gamaliel. Jesus was soon to encounter these wise and prudent at the Feast of Tabernacles.

These two verses, 21, 22, show that Jesus, in illustrating his mystical unity with the Father, rose into precisely the style of his discourses as reported in the Gospel of John.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘In that same hour he rejoiced (‘was thrilled with joy”) in the Holy Spirit, and said, “I thank you, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you hid these things from the wise and understanding, and revealed them to babes. Yes, Father, for so it was well-pleasing in your sight.” ’

‘In that same hour.’ This closely connects what follows with what has gone before. It is important that His disciples have their hearts and minds centred on what is of primary importance, and not be taken up with the idea of the casting out of evil spirits. God Himself must always take precedence over His work (compare Luke 10:42).

‘Rejoiced in Spirit.’ Note in the passage the build up of joy. The disciples returned with joy. They are rather to rejoice that their names are written in heaven. Now comes fullness of joy in that God has revealed Himself to His own.

We learn here first of all that Jesus is still ‘full of the Holy Spirit” (Luke 4:1), for He ‘rejoices’ (is ‘thrilled with joy’) as a result of the Holy Spirit at work within Him. And through the same Holy Spirit He thanks His Father, Who is Lord of heaven and earth, because it has pleased Him, while hiding ‘these things’ from the wise and understanding, to reveal it to those who are babes in wisdom and understanding. ‘These things’ include the authority and power of Jesus over evil spirits by virtue of Who He is. The disciples could do what they did because within their hearts, even if not fully in their heads, they knew Who Jesus really is. Thus the Father has given them a revelation of Who and What the Son is. And He has done it because it was pleasing in His sight. It is of His sovereign will, and not of their deserving. Thus we have here confirmation that, although they may not have been able to put it into words, they are within them aware of the full divinity of Jesus.

‘He rejoiced in the Holy Spirit.’ This is indicating in Jesus’ unique case what was previously expressed in terms of ‘being filled with the Holy Spirit’. But because He is continually full of the Holy Spirit (Luke 4:1) this filling is ever within Him, thus when prophesying He rejoices and exults in the Holy Spirit Who is continually within Him in full measure, rather than receiving a filling. He is unique. The Holy Spirit is not given to Him by measure (John 3:34). He continually enjoys His total fullness. These words that follow are then specifically to be seen as ‘prophecy’, the forthtelling of what comes from God in inspired form, similar to the prophecy we saw in chapters 1 & 2, but this time through a perfect channel.

‘You hid these things from the wise and understanding, and revealed them to babes.’ In Psalms 8:2 we read, ‘Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings you have established strength.’ Jesus may well have had these words in mind in the form in which He cited it in Matthew 21:16, replacing ‘strength’ with ‘praise’. The babes praise because they are given the understanding that others lack, compare Luke 18:16-17, and thereby are made strong for God.

For the whole principle of comparison between the weak and the strong in God’s purposes see 1 Corinthians 1:18-20; 1 Corinthians 1:26-29. The wise and understanding from whom such things are hidden include the chief priests, the Scribes and the Pharisees. And even past kings and prophets did not know them because they had not yet been revealed (Luke 10:24).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Holy Spirit"s role in Jesus" ministry was another special interest of Luke"s. The record of Jesus" similar prayer in Matthew 11:25-26 lacks the references to joy and the Holy Spirit. The phrase "rejoiced...in the Holy Spirit" (NASB) probably means that the Holy Spirit was the source of Jesus" joy (cf. Acts 13:52). He gave it to Jesus. This notation strengthens the force of what Jesus proceeded to say. All three members of the Trinity appear in this verse. The Son empowered by the Spirit addressed His Father. This, too, points to a very significant statement to follow.

Jesus praised God for something the Father had done. He addressed God intimately as His Father (Gr. pater, the equivalent of the Aramaic abba, cf. Luke 11:2). The title "Lord of heaven and earth" was a common one for Jews to use. It came from Genesis 14:19; Genesis 14:22, and it draws attention to God"s sovereignty. This allusion was appropriate in view of what Jesus thanked God for. Jesus probably meant that He praised God that although He had hidden the gospel of the kingdom from the humanly wise, He had, nevertheless, revealed it to the humble (cf. Luke 1:48-55; Luke 8:10; 1 Corinthians 1:18-31). The last sentence evidently means, "Yes, O Father, I praise you because this was your will (and I agree with it)." The wise and understanding people that Jesus had in mind were probably the Jewish religious leaders, and the babes were His disciples. Jesus rejoiced in the privilege these disciples had had of understanding God"s ways as they participated in His mission.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-10.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:21. In that hour. This definite mark of time joins this utterance of our Lord (Luke 10:21-22) with the return of the Seventy.

Joyed. A strong word, applied to our Lord only here. The one hour of joy was in sympathy with His faithful preachers.

In the Holy Spirit. This is the sense, according to the best authorities. The expression is indeed unusual. We have here a remarkable grouping of the Three Persons of the Trinity.

I thank thee, etc. See on Matthew 11:25-27, where the same expressions occur in a different connection. Our Lord probably uttered these weighty words on both occasions. In Matthew, moreover, they form a confession, here a ground of rejoicing in connection with the triumph of the ‘babes.’ The language reminds us of the profound passages in the Gospel of John. The important truth respecting our Lord’s relation to the Father, here set forth, underlies all the Gospels.

These things. In this connection all that is implied in the phrase: ‘that your names are written in heaven.’

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:21 is almost verbatim, as in Matthew 11:25, only that Lk. has for Mt.’s .

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

He rejoiced in the Holy Ghost. In almost all Greek copies, we read in spirit, without holy. And it is expounded of Christ's own spirit. (Witham) --- I give thanks, &c. In this verse we see plainly refuted the heretical Marcion, and his follower Manicheus, who asserted that God was not the creator of the earth, or of any thing existing on the earth. St. Epiphanius says, that in a gospel written by Marcion, the words Father and earth were entirely omitted. Who does not here deplore the blindness of heretics, who, in order to spread their errors, do not hesitate thus to corrupt the original Scripture received by the whole Christian world!!! (Denis the Carthusian)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Jesus. Om. by all the texts.

rejoiced = exulted.

in spirit. Greek. en (App-104.) pneuma. See App-101. But all the texts read "by the Spirit, the

Holy [Spirit]". App-101.

I thank. See notes on Matthew 11:25-27.

Lord, &c. Havingtherefore absolute power. App-98. B. b.

hast hid = didst hide,

from. Greek. apo. App-104.

hast revealed = didst reveal.

so = thus.

seemed good = was it well-pleasing.

in Thy sight = before thee.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

In that hour Jesus rejoiced [ eegalliasato (G21), or 'exulted,'] in spirit - giving visible expression to His unusual emotions, while the words "in spirit" express the depth of them.

And said, I thank thee, [ Exomologoumai (Greek #1843) soi (Greek #4671)] - rather, 'I assent to thee;' but with the idea of full or cordial concurrence, expressed by the preposition. (See the note at Matthew 11:25.)

That thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.
Jesus
15:5,9; Isaiah 53:11; 62:5; Zephaniah 3:17
I thank
Matthew 11:25,26; John 11:41; 17:24-26
Lord
Psalms 24:1; Isaiah 66:1
thou hast
Job 5:12-14; Isaiah 29:14; 1 Corinthians 1:9-26; 2:6-8; 3:18-20; 2 Corinthians 4:3; Colossians 2:2,3
revealed
Psalms 8:2; 25:14; Isaiah 29:18,19; 35:8; Matthew 13:11-16; 16:17; 21:16; Mark 10:15; 1 Corinthians 1:27-29; 2:6,7; 1 Peter 2:1,2
even
Ephesians 1:5,11
Reciprocal: Genesis 14:19 - possessor;  2 Samuel 7:21 - according;  Job 28:23 - GeneralJob 37:24 - he;  Psalm 16:9 - my heart;  Isaiah 54:13 - all;  Daniel 2:23 - thank;  Zechariah 12:7 - save;  Mark 4:11 - Unto you;  Mark 11:33 - Neither;  Luke 4:25 - many;  Luke 8:10 - Unto;  Luke 12:32 - it is;  John 8:19 - if;  John 10:15 - As;  John 17:6 - have manifested;  Acts 17:24 - seeing;  Romans 1:14 - both to;  Romans 9:16 - General1 Corinthians 1:21 - the world;  1 Corinthians 1:26 - that;  1 Corinthians 2:10 - God;  1 Corinthians 12:18 - as it;  Galatians 1:15 - it;  Philippians 3:8 - the excellency;  Colossians 1:19 - General2 Timothy 1:9 - according to his;  Hebrews 13:15 - giving thanks to;  Revelation 11:17 - We give

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:21". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.