Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:38

Now as they were traveling along, He entered a village; and a woman named Martha welcomed Him into her home.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Bethany;   Faith;   Friendship;   Hospitality;   Jesus, the Christ;   Martha;   Mary;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bethany;   Guest, Christ a;   Hospitality;   Martha;   Social Life;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Martha;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Teacher;   Women;   Work;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Hospitality;   Sexuality, Human;   Woman;   Work;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Martha;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Education;   Jericho;   John, the Gospel According to;   Lazarus;   Martha;   Simeon;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Lazarus;   Luke, Gospel of;   Marriage;   Martha;   Woman;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the New Testament;   Martha;   Mary;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Activity;   Bethany ;   Gentiles;   Guest;   Invitation;   Lord's Prayer (I);   Martha ;   Mary;   Minister, Ministration;   Mount of Olives ;   Poverty (2);   Property (2);   Social Life;   Stranger, Alien, Foreigner;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Martha ;   Mary, Sister of Lazarus and Martha;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Martha;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida;   Martha;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Mar'tha;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Guest;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Lazarus;   Martha;   Mary;   Olives, Mount of;   Papyrus;   Text and Manuscripts of the New Testament;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

A certain village - If this village was Bethany, where Martha and Mary lived, at less than two miles' distance from Jerusalem, see John 11:1, John 11:18; John 12:2, then this must have happened later than Luke places it; because, in Luke 19:29, he represents Jesus as having arrived after this at Bethany; and what is said in Luke 13:22, and Luke 17:11, seems to confirm that this visit of Jesus to Martha and Mary ought to be placed later. Bishop Pearce.

Received him - Kindly received, ὑπεδεξατο, she received him in a friendly manner, under her roof; and entertained him hospitably. So the word is used in the best Greek writers. Martha is supposed by some to have been a widow, with whom her brother Lazarus and sister Mary lodged.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A certain village - Bethany. See John 11:1. It was on the eastern declivity of the Mount of Olives. See the notes at Matthew 21:1.

Received him - Received him kindly and hospitably. From this it would seem that “Martha” was properly the mistress of the house. Possibly she was a widow, and her brother Lazarus and younger sister Mary lived with her; and as “she” had the care of the household, this will also show why she was so diligently employed about domestic affairs.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-10.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Now as they went on their way, he entered into a certain village; and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

THE INCIDENT IN THE HOME OF MARY AND MARTHA

A certain village ... This is undoubtedly Bethany; and Martha and her sister named in the next verse are undoubtedly the sisters of Lazarus whom Jesus raised from the dead (John 11). It is an error to understand all the incidents in this section of Luke as if they had been successive events consecutively following each other as in some kind of a journey. "Luke does not appear to be using a journey sequence, though that was suggested at Luke 9:51."[25]

ENDNOTE:

[25] Ray Summers, op. cit., p. 137.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Now it came to pass as they went,.... As Christ and his disciples went from Jerusalem, having been at the feast of tabernacles, John 7:2 or at the feast of dedication, John 10:22 to some other parts of Judea:

that he entered into a certain village; called Bethany, which was about fifteen furlongs, or two miles from Jerusalem, John 11:1

and a certain woman named Martha. This is a common name with the Jews; hence we read of Samuel bar MarthaF25T. Bab. Beracot, fol. 13. 2. & 25. 2. & Pesachim, fol. 106. 2. Yoma, fol. 19. 2. Juchuin, fol. 76. 2. , and of Abba bar MarthaF26T. Bab. Sabbat, fol. 121. 2. Juchasin, fol. 72. 2. , and of Isaac bar MarthaF1T. Bab. Pesachim, fol. 33. 2. Juchasin, fol. 91. 1. ; and of Martha, the daughter of BaithusF2Misn. Yebamot, c. 6. sect. 4. T. Bob. Yoma, fol. 18. 1. Succa, fol. 52. 2. Cetubot, fol. 104. 1. Gittin, fol. 56. 1. Juchasin, fol. 57. 1. , who is said to be a rich widow; and this Martha here, is thought by Grotins to be a widow also, with whom her brother Lazarus, and sister Mary lived: though sometimes, this name was given to men; so we read of Martha,F3Juchasin, fol. 99. 1. the uncle of Rab, who had five brethren; and the same writer observesF4lb. fol. 105. 1. , that it is not known whether Martha is, a man or a woman, but this is determined here:

received him into her house; in a very kind and courteous manner, she being mistress of it; and having known Christ before, or at least had heard much of him, and believed in him, as the true Messiah.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

10 Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

(10) Christ does not desire to be waited upon in a delicate manner, but to be heard diligently; this is that which he especially requires.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-10.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 10:38-42. Martha and Mary.

certain village — Bethany (John 11:1), which Luke so speaks of, having no farther occasion to notice it.

received him  …  her house — The house belonged to her, and she appears throughout to be the older sister.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

38. Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

[Martha received him, &c.] Our Saviour is now at the feast of Tabernacles: and visits Bethany, where there had grown a friendship betwixt himself and Lazarus' family, upon his having cast out so many devils out of Mary his sister. For it is no foreign thing to suppose she was that Mary that was called Magdalene, because Bethany itself was called Magdala. As to the name Martha, see notes upon John 11: and as to the name Magdala, see notes upon John 12.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-10.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

Entered into a certain village. Bethany, the home of Mary, Martha and Lazarus. It is probable that this incident is not related in its order of time. It may have occurred on the last journey.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-10.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Now as they went on their way (ην δε τωι πορευεσται αυτουςēn de tōi poreuesthai autous). Luke‘s favourite temporal clause again as in Luke 10:35.

Received him into her house (υπεδεχατο αυτον εις την οικιανhupedexato auton eis tēn oikian). Aorist middle indicative of υποδεχομαιhupodechomai an old verb to welcome as a guest (in the N.T. only here and Luke 19:6; Acts 17:7; James 2:25). Martha is clearly the mistress of the home and is probably the elder sister. There is no evidence that she was the wife of Simon the leper (John 12:1.). It is curious that in an old cemetery at Bethany the names of Martha, Eleazar, and Simon have been found.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Received ( ὑπεδέξατο )

From ὕπο , under, and δέχομαι , to receive. Received him under her roof. Martha is marked as the head of the household. It was her house. She received the guest, and was chiefly busy with the preparations for his entertainment (Luke 10:40).

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

Now as they went on their way1, he entered into a certain village2: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.
    JESUS THE GUEST OF MARTHA AND MARY. (Bethany, near Jerusalem.) Luke 10:38-42

  1. Now as they went on their way. He was journeying through Judea, attended by the twelve.

  2. He entered into a certain village. It was the village of Bethany (John 11:1), which was less than two miles from Jerusalem.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

As they went; that is, once as they were travelling.--A certain village; Bethany. (John 11:1.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-10.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

38 Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

Ver. 38. A certain village] viz. Bethany, John 11:1. {See Trapp on "John 11:1"}

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here,

1. The great work and business of our Saviour's life: it was to go about preaching he gospel.

2. The nature of the place which Christ at this time preached in: it was a poor village; Bethany, as some think. Christ did not only take care of populous cities, and great towns, but private villages and obscure places enjoyed also the blessing of his ministry.

Our Saviour's example herein is instructive to his ministers, not to affect great auditories, and to preach only in populous cities, but to scatter the seed of the word in country villages, where are like precious souls to be taken care of, and provided for; as Christ was sent himself, so he sends his ministers to preach the gospel to the poor.

Observe 3. The party that entertained him in the village: Martha received him into her house. Martha is named, because she was probably the owner of the house. Though Christ had not a house of his own, yet he had as many as he pleased at his command; for wherever he had an heart he was sure to have an house: Martha received him into her house.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-10.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

38.] ἐν τῷ πορ. need make no difficulty—the whole of the events related in this section of the Gospel are allotted, as in the widest sense they belonged, to the last journey of our Lord from Galilee, which ended in the triumphal entry into Jerusalem: see note on ch. Luke 9:51 ff. Jesus, as we know that He afterwards did, so now probably, when at Jerusalem (at the feast of Dedication), abode at Bethany. He ‘loved’—(only used in this sense by John with regard to this family, and to himself)—Martha and Mary and Lazarus—and this word implies surely hospitality and intercourse.

γυνή τις—it does not follow that Martha was a widow; the incident brings out the two sisters, and therefore no others are mentioned. She may have had a husband or a father living. At all events, it is a consistency belonging to real life, that we find the same person prominent in the family in John, as here.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-10.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:38. ἐν τῷ πορεύεσθαι] to be understood of the continuation of the journey to Jerusalem. See Luke 9:51; Luke 9:57, Luke 10:1. But Jesus cannot yet be in Bethany (see Luke 13:22, Luke 17:11), where Martha and Mary dwelt (John 11:1; John 12:1 f.), and hence it is to be supposed that Luke, because he was unacquainted with the more detailed circumstances of the persons concerned, transposed this incident, which must have occurred in Bethany, and that on an earlier festal journey, not merely to the last journey, but also to some other village, and that a village of Galilee. The tradition, or the written source, which he followed had preserved the fact and the names of the persons, but not the time and place of the incident. If we regard Luke as unacquainted with those particulars, the absence of all mention of Lazarus is the less surprising, seeing that the substance of the history concerns the sisters only (in opposition to Strauss, I. p. 751).

καὶ αὐτός] καί is the usual and after ἐγένετο, and αὐτός brings Jesus Himself into prominence above the company of travellers ( αὐτούς). He, on His part, without the disciples, went into the village and abode at the house of Martha.

The notion that Martha was the wife (Bleek, Hengstenberg) or widow (Paulus) of Simon the leper, is based upon mistaken harmonistics. See on Luke 7:36 ff. and Matthew 26:6 f. Whether she was a widow at all (Grotius) does not appear. She was the housekeeper and manager of the household, and probably the elder sister.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:38 αὐτὸς, He Himself) Sometimes He did not enter.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 38,39. Interpreters think this village was Bethany, and that this Martha and Mary were the same which are mentioned John 11:2. Inns probably were not so frequent then, and in those places, as they are now, so as strangers were often received in private houses. Christ loseth no opportunity of preaching the gospel; while they were preparing supper, he was entertaining the family with the glad tidings of the gospel, the feast of fat things made upon the mountain, Isaiah 25:6. The lips of the righteous feed many, Proverbs 10:21. It was their fashion to have disciples sit at their doctors’ feet, to hear their word; there Mary fixes herself.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:38". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

одно селение Вифания, расположенная двумя милями (3,2 км) восточнее храма в Иерусалиме, на восточном склоне Елеонской горы. Там жили Мария, Марфа и Лазарь (ср. Ин. 11:1).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-10.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

A certain village; Bethany. Matthew 21:17.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

38.A certain village—The village unquestionably was Bethany. Luke says nothing of Lazarus, and his account is evidently independent of John; and yet the character and condition of Mary and Martha so perfectly agree with their appearance in John as to furnish a striking proof of the truth of both.

Received him into her house—Martha, it is evident, not only from this place, but from the order in which the three are named in John 12:5, was the housekeeper. Whether she was a widow or maiden lady we know not; we only know that she was mistress, if not proprietor of the house.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Now as they went on their way, he entered into a certain village, and a certain woman named Martha received him.’

The certain village is almost certainly Bethany, which was less than two miles (three kilometres) from Jerusalem (John 11:18; John 12:1-3), but Luke deliberately avoids mentioning it so as not to disturb the sequence of the theological ‘journey to Jerusalem’. Here lived Jesus’ friends Martha, Mary and Lazarus. And here He, and probably His disciples, was received into her house by Martha, certainly for a meal and possibly to stay. Note the stress on the fact that Martha ‘received Him’. Luke does not want her seen as anything but responsive to Jesus. She was delighted to see Him. (‘Into her house’ is a probably a copyist’s comment)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Luke"s reference to travel keeps the travel theme in view. We continue to see Jesus moving toward Jerusalem and the fulfillment of His mission. It also explains the reason for Martha and Mary"s hospitality. Luke did not mention that this incident happened in Bethany (cf. John 11:1; John 12:1). He probably omitted this detail to keep his readers from becoming too preoccupied with Jesus" exact movements, which Luke viewed as relatively unimportant.

Luke presented Martha as the primary hostess. Her name derives from the Aramaic mar meaning "mistress," which is appropriate since she was the mistress of her house. Her eagerness to receive Jesus contrasts with the Samaritans who had not welcomed Him ( Luke 9:53).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-10.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:38. As they journeyed. During the great journey from Galilee to Jerusalem, spoken of in this part of the Gospel.

A certain village. Luke does not say Bethany. The name is Tar more familiar to us than it would have been to Theophilus.

Martha. The name means ‘lady,’ answering to the Greek word used in 2 John 1:5.

Into her house. She was probably the elder sister, and hence the hostess. There is no proof that she was a widow, or the wife of Simon the leper (see Matthew 26:6). In this first mention of her, as receiving our Lord, doubtless with great joy, we have an intimation of her character.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:38. , in continuation of the wandering whose beginning is noted at Luke 9:52; when, where, not indicated.— : either not known, or the name deemed of no importance. When it is stated that He ( ) (Jesus) came to this village it is not implied that He was alone, though no mention is made of disciples in the narrative.— = mistress, feminine of .

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Now. Verses 38-42peculiar to Luke.

Martha. Aramaean. App-94.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village. The village was Bethany-as to which, see the note at Luke 19:29. It will be seen how void of all definite note of time and place are the incidents recorded in this large portion of our Gospel, as noticed at Luke 9:51.

And a certain woman named Martha received him into her house. From this way of speaking we gather that the house belonged to her, and from all the notices of her it would seem that she was the older sister.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

38. He came to a certain village. This is Bethany, home of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus. We do not know the exact time this happened. It might have been on his last trip to Jerusalem.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-10.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(38) He entered into a certain village.—The identity of the two names that follow, and, we may add, of the characters connected with the names, leaves hardly room for doubt that the village thus spoken of was Bethany. (See Note on Matthew 21:1.) St. Luke’s reason for not giving the name is probably connected with the singular reticence of the first three Gospels as to the family of Lazarus. St. Matthew (Matthew 26:7) and St. Mark (Mark 14:3) narrate the anointing, which we learn from John 12:3 to have been the act of Mary, but suppress her name. St. Luke gives, in this section, a characteristic anecdote of the two sisters, but suppresses the name of the village in which they lived. None of the first three Gospels name Lazarus, though there seems some reason to believe that the first two narrate a fact in which he took a prominent part (see Note on Matthew 19:16), and that the third gives the name with a special reference to him. (See Note on Luke 16:20.) A probable explanation is that, both on spiritual and perhaps social grounds, reticence as to the family of Bethany was, for a time, generally maintained among the disciples of Jerusalem, and that St. Luke, coming at a later period, and finding his way, as a physician, into the company of devout women, named one fact that seemed of special interest. (See Introduction, and Note on chap Luke 8:1.)

Martha.—The name does not appear in the Old Testament, and is Aramaic rather than Hebrew. It has a point of contact with secular history in having been borne by the Syrian prophetess who accompanied the Roman general, Marius, in his Numidian campaigns. Its meaning, as the feminine of Maran (= Lord), and therefore equivalent to the Greek Kyria, suggests the possible identity of the sister of Lazarus with the elect Kyria (or elect Lady), to whom St. John addressed his second Epistle. (See Note on 2 John 1:1.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.
a certain
John 11:1-5; 12:1-3
received
8:2,3; Acts 16:15; 2 John 1:10
Reciprocal: Genesis 18:6 - three;  Matthew 10:11 - inquire;  Matthew 21:17 - Bethany;  Luke 7:43 - Thou;  John 11:28 - and called;  John 12:2 - Martha;  John 12:3 - took

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

38.And it happened that he entered into a certain village. This narrative shows, that Christ, wherever he came, did not devote himself to his private concerns, or consult his own ease or comfort; but that the single object which he kept in view was, to do good to others, and to discharge the office which had been committed to him by the Father. Luke relates that, having been hospitably received by Martha, as soon as he entered the house, he began to teach and exhort. As this passage has been basely distorted into the commendation of what is called a Contemplative life, we must inquire into its true meaning, from which it will appear, that nothing was farther from the design of Christ, than to encourage his disciples to indulge in indolence, or in useless speculations. It is, no doubt, an old error (253), that those who withdraw from business, and devote themselves entirely to a contemplative, lead an Angelical life. For the absurdities which the Sorbonnists (254) utter on this subject they appear to have been indebted to Aristotle, who places the highest good, and ultimate end, of human life in contemplation, which, according to him, is the enjoyment of virtue. When some men were driven by ambition to withdraw from the ordinary intercourse of life, or when peevish men gave themselves up to solitude and indolence, the resolution to adopt that course was followed by such pride, that they imagined themselves to be like the angels, because they did nothing; for they entertained as great a contempt for active life, as if it had kept them back from heaven. On the contrary, we know that men were created for the express purpose of being employed in labor of various kinds, and that no sacrifice is more pleasing to God, than when every man applies diligently to his own calling, and endeavors to live in such a manner as to contribute to the general advantage. (255)

How absurdly they have perverted the words of Christ to support their own contrivance, will appear manifest when we have ascertained the natural meaning. Luke says that Mary sat at the feet of Jesus Does he mean that she did nothing else throughout her whole life? On the contrary, the Lord enjoins his followers to make such a distribution of their time, that he who desires to make proficiency in the school of Christ shall not always be an idle hearer but shall put in practice what he has learned; for there is a time to hear, and a time to act. (256) It is, therefore, a foolish attempt of the monks to take hold of this passage, as if Christ were drawing a comparison between a contemplative and an active life, while Christ simply informs us for what end, and in what manner, he wishes to be received.

Though the hospitality of Martha deserved commendation, and is commended, yet there were two faults in it which are pointed out by Christ. The first is, that Martha carried her activity beyond proper bounds; for Christ would rather have chosen to be entertained in a frugal manner, and at moderate expense, than that the holy woman should have submitted to so much toil. The second fault was, that Martha, by distracting her attention, and undertaking more labor than was necessary, deprived herself of the advantage of Christ’s visit. The excess is pointed out by Luke, when he speaks of much serving; for Christ was satisfied with little. It was just as if one were to give a magnificent reception to a prophet, and yet not to care about hearing him, but, on the contrary, to make so great and unnecessary preparations as to bury all the instruction. But the true way of receiving prophets is, to accept the advantage which God presents and offers to us through their agency.

We now see that the kind attention of Martha, though it deserved praise, was not without its blemishes. There was this additional evil, that Martha was so delighted with her own bustling operations, as to despise her sister’s pious eagerness to receive instruction. (257) This example warns us, that, in doing what is right, we must take care not to think more highly of ourselves than of others.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:38". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-10.html. 1840-57.