Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:37

And he said, "The one who showed mercy toward him." Then Jesus said to him, "Go and do the same."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflicted;   Commandments;   Duty;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Lawyer;   Love;   Neighbor;   Readings, Select;   Self-Righteousness;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Go, Commands of Christ;   Home;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Service;   Stories for Children;   Work, Religious;   Work-Workers, Religious;   Works;   The Topic Concordance - Deeds;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Mercy;   Parables;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Parable;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Love;   Luke, gospel of;   Mercy;   Mission;   Neighbour;   Parables;   Samaria, samaritans;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Clean, Unclean;   Friend, Friendship;   Hospitality;   Law of Christ;   Love;   Mercy;   Neighbor;   Wealth;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Mercy;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Hospitality;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Brotherly Love;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Life;   Luke, Gospel of;   Mercy, Merciful;   Neighbor;   Parables;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the New Testament;   Ethics;   Law;   Martha;   Mary;   Parable;   Pity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Almsgiving ;   Character;   Commandments;   Discourse;   Heart;   Justice (2);   Law of God;   Love (2);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Man (2);   Money (2);   Neighbour (2);   New Commandment;   Parable;   Personality;   Reality;   Religious Experience;   Samaria ;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Samaritan, the Good ;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Saying and Doing;   Spiritualizing of the Parables;   Toleration, Tolerance;   Trade and Commerce;   Trinity (2);   Wealth (2);   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida;   Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Children of God;   Compassion;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Law in the New Testament;   Like;   Neighbor;   Righteousness;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Brotherly Love;   Jesus of Nazareth;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for May 19;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He that showed mercy - Or, so much mercy. His prejudice would not permit him to name the Samaritan, yet his conscience obliged him to acknowledge that he was the only righteous person of the three.

Go, and do thou likewise - Be even to thy enemy in distress as kind, humane, and merciful, as this Samaritan was. As the distress was on the part of a Jew, and the relief was afforded by a Samaritan, the lawyer, to be consistent with the decision he had already given, must feel the force of our Lord's inference, that it was his duty to act to any person, of whatever nation or religion he might be, as this Samaritan had acted toward his countryman. It is very likely that what our Lord relates here was a real matter of fact, and not a parable; otherwise the captious lawyer might have objected that no such case had ever existed, and that any inference drawn from it was only begging the question; but as he was, in all probability, in possession of the fact himself, he was forced to acknowledge the propriety of our Lord's inference and advice.

Those who are determined to find something allegorical, even in the plainest portions of Scripture, affirm that the whole of this relation is to be allegorically considered; and, according to them, the following is the true exposition of the text.

The certain man means Adam - went down, his fall - from Jerusalem, שלום יראה yorih shalom, he shall see peace, perfection, etc., meaning his state of primitive innocence and excellence - to Jericho, (ירחי yareacho, his moon), the transitory and changeable state of existence in this world - thieves, sin and Satan - stripped, took away his righteousness, which was the clothing of the soul - wounded, infected his heart with all evil and hurtful desires, which are the wounds of the spirit - half dead, possessing a living body, carrying about a soul dead in sin.

The priest, the moral law - the Levite, the ceremonial law - passed by, either could not or would not afford any relief, because by the law is the knowledge of sin, not the cure of it. A certain Samaritan, Christ; for so he was called by the Jews, John 8:48; - as he journeyed, meaning his coming from heaven to earth; his being incarnated - came where he was, put himself in man's place, and bore the punishment due to his sins - had compassion, it is through the love and compassion of Christ that the work of redemption was accomplished - went to him, Christ first seeks the sinner, who, through his miserable estate, is incapable of seeking or going to Christ - bound up his wounds, gives him comfortable promises, and draws him by his love - pouring in oil, pardoning mercy - wine, the consolations of the Holy Ghost - set him on his own beast, supported him entirely by his grace and goodness, so that he no longer lives, but Christ lives in him - took him to an inn, his Church, uniting him with his people - took care of him, placed him under the continual notice of his providence and love - when he departed, when he left the world and ascended to the Father - took out two pence, or denarii, the law and the Gospel; the one to convince of sin, the other to show how it is to be removed - gave them to the host, the ministers of the Gospel for the edification of the Church of Christ - take care of him, as they are Gods watchmen and God's stewards, they are to watch over the flock of Christ, and give to each his portion of meat in due season. What thou spendest more, if thou shouldst lose thy health and life in this work - when I come again, to judge the world, I will repay thee, I will reward thee with an eternity of glory.

Several primitive and modern fathers treat the text in this way. What I have given before is, I believe, the meaning of our blessed Lord. What I have given here is generally true in itself, but certainly does not follow from the text. Mr. Baxter's note here is good: "They who make the wounded man Adam, and the good Samaritan Christ, abuse the passage." A practice of this kind cannot be too strongly reprehended. Men may take that advantage of the circumstances of the case to illustrate the above facts and doctrines; but let no man say this is the meaning of the relation; no: but he may say, we may make this use of it. Though I cannot recommend this kind of preaching, yet I know that some simple upright souls have been edified by it. I dare not forbid a man to work by whom God may choose to work a miracle, because he follows not with us. But such a mode of interpretation I can never recommend.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He that showed mercy - His “Jewish” prejudice would not permit him “to name” the Samaritan, but there was no impropriety, even in his view, in saying that the man who showed so much mercy was really the neighbor to the afflicted, and not he who “professed” to be his neighbor, but who would “do nothing” for his welfare.

Go, and do thou likewise - Show the same kindness to “all” - to friend and foe - and “then” you will have evidence that you keep the law, and not “till” then. Of this man we know nothing farther; but from this inimitably beautiful parable we may learn:

1. That the knowledge of the law is useful to make us acquainted with our own sinfulness and need of a Saviour.

2. That it is not he who “professes” most kindness that really loves us most, but he who will most deny himself that he may do us good in times of want.

3. That religion requires us to do good to “all” people, however “accidentally” we may become acquainted with their calamities.

4. That we should do good to our enemies. Real love to them will lead us to deny ourselves, and to sacrifice our own welfare, that we may help them in times of distress and alleviate their wants.

5. That he is really our neighbor who does us the most good - who helps us in our necessities, and especially if he does this when there has been “a controversy or difference” between us and him.

6. We hence see the beauty of religion. Nothing else will induce people to surmount their prejudices, to overcome opposition, and to do good to those who are at enmity with them. True religion teaches us to regard every man as our neighbor; prompts us to do good to all, to forget all national or sectional distinctions, and to aid all those who are in circumstances of poverty and want. If religion were valuable for nothing “but this,” it would be the most lovely and desirable principle on earth, and all, especially in their early years, should seek it. Nothing that a young person can gain will be so valuable as the feeling that regards all the world as one great family, and to learn early to do good to all.

7. The difference between the Jew and the Samaritan was a difference in “religion” and “religious opinion;” and from the example of the latter we may learn that, while people differ in “opinions” on subjects of religion, and while they are zealous for what they hold to be the truth, still they should treat each other kindly; that they should aid each other in necessity; and that they should thus show that religion is a principle superior to the love of sect, and that the cord which binds man to man is one that is to be sundered by no difference of opinion, that Christian kindness is to be marred by no forms of worship, and by no bigoted attachment for what we esteem the doctrines of the gospel.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-10.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he said, he that showed mercy to him,.... Meaning the Samaritan; which he was obliged to declare, though of another country and religion, and accounted as an enemy; yet the case was so plain, as put by Christ, that he could not with any honour or conscience, say otherwise:

then said Jesus unto him, go and do thou likewise; such like acts of beneficence and kindness, though to a person of a different nation and religion, and though even an enemy; and by so doing, thou wilt not only appear to be a good neighbour thyself, but to love thy neighbour as thyself.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Go, etc. — O exquisite, matchless teaching! What new fountains of charity has not this opened up in the human spirit - rivers in the wilderness, streams in the desert! What noble Christian institutions have not such words founded, all undreamed of till that wondrous One came to bless this heartless world of ours with His incomparable love - first in words, and then in deeds which have translated His words into flesh and blood, and poured the life of them through that humanity which He made His own! Was this parable, now, designed to magnify the law of love, and to show who fulfils it and who not? And who did this as never man did it, as our Brother Man, “our Neighbor?” The priests and Levites had not strengthened the diseased, nor bound up the broken (Ezekiel 34:4), while He bound up the brokenhearted (Isaiah 61:1), and poured into all wounded spirits the balm of sweetest consolation. All the Fathers saw through the thin veil of this noblest of stories, the Story of love, and never wearied of tracing the analogy (though sometimes fancifully enough) [Trench]. Exclaims Gregory Nazianzen (in the fourth century), “He hungered, but He fed thousands; He was weary, but He is the Rest of the weary; He is saluted ‹Samaritan‘ and ‹Demoniac,‘ but He saves him that went down from Jerusalem and fell among thieves,” etc.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

On him (μετ αυτουmet' autou). With him, more exactly. The lawyer saw the point and gave the correct answer, but he gulped at the word “Samaritan” and refused to say that.

Do thou (συ ποιειsu poiei). Emphasis on “thou.” Would this Jewish lawyer act the neighbour to a Samaritan? This parable of the Good Samaritan has built the world‘s hospitals and, if understood and practised, will remove race prejudice, national hatred and war, class jealousy.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

He that shewed mercy on him. ( μετά )

Rather with him: ( μετά ): dealt with him as with a brother. The lawyer avoids the hated word Samaritan.

sa40

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.

And he said, He that showed mercy on him — He could not for shame say otherwise, though he thereby condemned himself and overthrew his own false notion of the neighbour to whom our love is due.

Go and do thou in like manner — Let us go and do likewise, regarding every man as our neighbour who needs our assistance. Let us renounce that bigotry and party zeal which would contract our hearts into an insensibility for all the human race, but a small number whose sentiments and practices are so much our own, that our love to them is but self love reflected. With an honest openness of mind let us always remember that kindred between man and man, and cultivate that happy instinct whereby, in the original constitution of our nature, God has strongly bound us to each other.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-10.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he said, He that showed mercy on him1. And Jesus said unto him, Go, and do thou likewise2.

  1. He that showed mercy on him. The lawyer avoided the name Samaritan so distasteful to his lips. Jesus gave countenance to no such racial prejudice, even though the Samaritans had rejected him but a few weeks before this (Luke 9:53).

  2. Go, and do thou likewise. All the laws and teachings of God are to be generously interpreted (Matthew 5:43,44) and are to be embodied in the life (Matthew 7:24-27).

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

PRACTICAL CHRISTIANITY

‘Go, and do thou likewise.’

Luke 10:37

The parable of the Good Samaritan has been so frequently, so fully, so effectively dealt with that there is no need to dwell upon its details or to attempt once more to develop its spiritual teaching. It is my purpose to show in what ways we may obey the teaching which underlies the command of our Lord: ‘Go, and do thou likewise.’ To obey to the letter these words of the Lord might be to misread their meaning. The age in which we live, the land in which we live, the circumstances by which we are surrounded, differ as widely as possible from the age, the land, the circumstances of our Lord’s time. These things must be taken into account in trying to realise how we may do our Lord’s bidding.

I. In estimating our duty to our fellow-men, we must not take a narrow view of what that duty is.—When men read some sad story of distress they are always ready to throw the blame on some one else, the clergy by preference. Of course, the clergy have, within certain limits, a very clear duty to perform, even as regards the temporal needs of parishioners. They can hardly help getting to know where help is needed. But we know that they do not, as a rule, neglect this part of their duty. Very rightly they remember that a clergyman is not a relieving officer; that there is such a thing as the Poor Law; that in theory, at any rate, no one need starve in England. It is disastrous to spiritual influence if the clergy come to be looked upon as persons whose main duty is to relieve distress. But, whilst this is true, it is also true that they cannot neglect the bodily needs of their people without justly incurring blame. If, however, they are not to be absolutely overwhelmed by the mere serving of tables, aye, and to be crushed under a sense of the hopelessness of the task assigned them, their number in large parishes must be greatly increased, as also must the resources placed at their disposal; for both these matters there is opportunity to obey the Master’s command.

II. We are bound to remember that this command is to be obeyed in spirit rather than in letter.—What are the lessons for us now? Certainly not that we are to relieve every beggar we meet in the street, every person who comes to our door, every sturdy applicant for charity. Prevention is better than cure. Men are obeying the spirit of our Lord’s teaching when they strive to improve the condition of the people generally.

III. Christians are bound to obey the teaching of this parable because—

(a) By so doing they will commend spiritual religion to those who love it not.

(b) Christians will have many opportunities of pressing home spiritual truths which would never have been theirs had they neglected the temporal needs of their neighbours. Our Blessed Lord Himself won the hearts of the multitude by miracles of mercy. In such matters the Church as a whole, not the clergy alone, must take part. The religious layman who will take the time and trouble to share actively in improving the lot of his fellow-men is ever a power for good in spiritual things.

—Rev. Canon Scott.

Illustration

‘Lord Shaftesbury was obeying the spirit of this parable when he did his best to shorten hours of labour in Lancashire factories, and to prevent children under a certain age being employed in factory work. Mr. Plimsoll was obeying the spirit of this parable when he sought to render it impossible for ships to be sent to sea in an unfit condition, with unsuitable cargo, without a sufficient number of sailors. Mr. Raikes was obeying the spirit of this command when he instituted Sunday-schools. Mr. Cadbury was obeying the spirit of this command when he furnished what had been his own home as a holiday retreat and hospital for sick children. Every effort honestly put forth to make the world a happier and a better place, whether it be by distinctly evangelistic plans or by those which have as their first aim the improvement of the material condition of the people, is obedience to this command. But let us remember that such effort cannot be done by proxy. There must be personal work. It is quite true that those who are willing to give their money may do much; but all experience shows that the personal interest of a great many people is absolutely needful if large results are to be attained.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-10.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

37 And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.

Ver. 37. Go, and do thou likewise] Help him that hath need of thee, though he be a stranger; yea, or an enemy.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 10:37. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, &c.— What a lively picture have we in this parable, of the most disinterested and active benevolence!—A benevolence, which excludes no person, not even strangers or enemies, from its tender regards! which disdains no condescension, grudges no cost, in its labours of love! Could any method of conviction have been more forcible, and at the same time more pleasing, than the interrogatory proposed by our Lord, and deduced from the history, Luke 10:36.? or can there be an advice more suitable to the occasion, more important in its nature, or expressed with a more sententious energy, than Go, and do thou likewise. In this case the learner instructs, the delinquent condemns himself; bigotry hears away its prejudice; and pride (when the moral so sweetly, so imperceptibly insinuates), even pride itself lends a willing ear to admonition.

From our Lord's conduct in the case, we learn how to apply to the passions and prejudices of men, and by what art truth is best and most successfully introduced, where error has been long in possession. Were it a defect in our reason and understanding that made us disagree, and judge and act differently in cases where we have one and the same rule to go by, no human application could reach the distemper; since it is not in our power to enlarge the faculties which are bounded by God and nature; though the Spirit of God can do wonderful things in this respect. But our reason and our understanding are not in fault; they want only to be set free, and to be delivered from the bondage of passion and prejudice, to judge rightly in cases of morality andnatural justice. It is Self which influences the judgment of men, when they obstinately maintain and defend the cause of error or of vice: it is Self that always lies at the bottom: it is not so much the vice as Self that is to be defended; and if you can but separate Self from the vice, (which nothing but the grace of God can do,) the vice will soon be condemned and forsaken. By this honest, this holy art, our Lord convinced the lawyer, who put the question to him, Luke 10:25. He asked the question, intending that none should be admitted into the number of his neighbours, who were not nearly allied to him, of the same nation at least. Our Saviour states a case to him, and puts it so, that his prejudices were all thrown out and silenced. The consequence was, that he who wanted to exclude almost all mankind from a right to his good offices, in a few minutes owns even the Samaritan, his most hated enemy, to be the Jew's neighbour; and by owning and accepting the Samaritan's good offices done to the Jew under the relation of a neighbour, he confessed the Samaritan's right, in that relation, to expect and receive the good offices of the Jew. Whence we may draw the following consequences: 1. It is evident, that the true art of convincing of their errors men of obstinate prejudices, but of general discernment, is, to throw them as much as possible out of their case; for the less a man is concerned himself, the better he judges. You are not in such instances to stir and fret his prejudices, but to decline them; not to reproach him with the error that you condemn, but to place the error at a sufficient distance from him, that he may have a true light to view it in. We have a remarkable instance of this in the conduct of the prophet Nathan with David. But, after all, unless the sacred influences of divine grace accompany our efforts, no genuine good will ever arise even from the most refined arts of reasoning. 2. When once you find yourself, on such occasions, labouring to justify your actions, and searching for expositions which may suit your own inclinations, you may consider yourselfexceedingly far gone from the true liberty of the gospel. 3. If you find yourself involved in the case you are to judge of, instead of seeking for new reasons and arguments whereby to form your opinion, you had much better look back, and reflect what sense you had of this matter before the cause was your own; for it is ten to one but that judgment was much more free and impartial than any that you will make now: or consider, if the case admits it, what is the sense of the truly pious part of mankind; you may more safely trust them than yourself, when your passions are concerned. At least, suppose your enemy in the same circumstances with yourself, and doing what you find yourself inclined to, and consider what judgment you should make of him;—and so judge of yourself.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-10.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

37. πορεύου, κ. τ. λ.] The rendering is as in E. V., go and do thou likewise. The καὶ σύ belongs, not to the πορεύου, but to the ποίει, which carries the main stress, the πορεύου being only secondary.

The lawyer does not answer—‘The Samaritan:’ he avoids this; but he cannot avoid it in conviction and matter of fact.

ποίει ὁμ., i.e. ‘count all men thy neighbours and love them as thyself.’

The student accustomed to look at all below the surface of Scripture, will not miss the meaning which lies behind this parable, and which—while disclaiming all fanciful allegorizing of the text—I do not hesitate to say that our Lord Himself had in view when He uttered it. All acts of charity and mercy done here below, are but fragments and derivatives of that one great act of mercy which the Saviour came on earth to perform. And as He took on Him the nature of us all, being ‘not ashamed to call us brethren,’ counting us all His kindred,—so it is but natural that in holding up a mirror (for such is a parable) of the truth in this matter of duty, we should see in it not only the present and prominent group, but also Himself and His act of mercy behind. And thus we shall not (in spite of the scoffs which are sure to beset such an interpretation, from the superficial school of critics) give up the interpretation of the Fathers and other divines, who see in this poor traveller, going from the heavenly to the accursed city (Joshua 6:26; 1 Kings 16:34),—the race of man, the Adam who fell;—in the robbers and murderers, him who was a murderer from the beginning (John 8:44);—in the treatment of the traveller, the deep wounds and despoilment which we have inherited from the fall;—in the priest and the Levite passing by, the inefficacy of the law and sacrifice to heal and clothe us: Galatians 3:21 (Trench remarks, Parables, p. 316, note, edn. 4, that the Church, by joining the passage Galatians 3:16-23 as Epistle, with this Parable as Gospel for the 13th Sunday after Trinity, has stamped this interpretation with her approval):—in the good Samaritan, Him of whom it was lately said, “Say we not well that thou art a Samaritan, and hast a devil?” (John 8:48)—who came to bind up the broken-hearted, to give them the oil of joy for mourning (Isaiah 61:1 ff.);—who for our sakes became poor, that we through His poverty might become rich: who, though now gone from us, has left with us precious gifts, and charged His ministers to feed His lambs, promising them, when the chief Shepherd shall appear, a crown of glory that fadeth not away (1 Peter 5:2; 1 Peter 5:4). Further perhaps it is well not to go;—or, if we do, only in our own private meditations, where, if we have the great clue to such interpretations,—knowledge of Christ for ourselves, and a sound mind under the guidance of His Spirit,—we shall not go far wrong. But minutely to allegorize, is to bring the sound spiritual interpretation into disrepute, and throw stumbling-blocks in the way of many, who might otherwise arrive at it.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-10.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:37. ποιήσας κ. τ. λ.] Bengel: “Non invitus abstinet legisperitus appellatione propria Samaritae.” On the expression, comp. Luke 1:72.

τὸ ἔλεος] the compassion related; καὶ σύ: thou also; not to be joined to πορεύου (Lachmann), but to ποίει. Comp. Luke 6:31.

REMARK.

Instead of giving to the theoretical question of the scribe, Luke 10:29, a direct and theoretical decision as to whom he was to regard as his neighbour, Jesus, by the feigned (according to Grotius and others, the circumstance actually occurred) history of the compassionate Samaritan, with all the force of the contrast that puts to shame the cold Jewish arrogance, gives a practical lesson on the question: how one actually becomes the neighbour of ANOTHER, namely, by the exercise of helpful love, independently of the nationality and religion of the persons concerned. And the questioner, in being dismissed with the direction, καὶ σὺ ποίει ὁμοίως, has therein indirectly the answer to his question, τίς ἐστί μου πλησίον; namely: Every one, without distinction of people and faith, to whom the circumstances analogous to the instance of the Samaritan direct thee to exercise helpful love in order thereby to become his neighbour, thou hast to regard as thy neighbour. This turn on the part of Jesus, like every feature of the improvised narrative, bears the stamp of originality in the pregnancy of its meaning, in the insight which suggested it, and in the quiet and yet perfectly frank way in which the questioner, by a direct personal appeal, was put to the blush.(138)

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:37. ποιήσας τὸ ἔλεος μετʼ αὐτοῦ) LXX. 2 Samuel 9:1, etc., has ποιήσω μετʼ αὐτοῦ ἔλεος. It is not without design, that the lawyer refrains from giving the proper appellation, “the Samaritan.” [He shrunk from attributing such credit to a Samaritan, and therefore does not use the name.]— πορεύου, go thy way) Not yet was this lawyer fit for discipleship.— καὶ σὺ, thou also) When once the love of one’s own people and sect is removed out of the way, the access then at length is the easier to the Grace, which is free and common to all. Therefore the Samaritan, say you, has by this act of his obtained eternal life? [Luke 10:25.] Comp. Luke 10:27-29. The answer to this may be given from Romans 2:26.— ποίει, do) This is in consonance with ποιήσας, he that did the deed of mercy.—[ ὁμοίως, likewise) We need not he ashamed of copying any good example set us, even though it be a Samaritan who is to be imitated.—V. g.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 10:30"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:37". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

And he said, “He who showed mercy on him.” And Jesus said to him, Go, and behave in the same way.”

So he salvaged some pride by saying, “He who showed mercy on him.” If we think that was easy for him to say that we do not know human beings. By that he had admitted that a Samaritan could be his neighbour, and that took some doing. True it was a Samaritan of compassion and mercy but that was not the point. The point was that this proud Jewish Scribe had had to admit to a Samaritan being his neighbour. For if he was neighbour to one Jew he was neighbour to all Jews. Even the Scribe would recognise that. In two minutes Jesus had swept away all his religious arguments and all his racial arguments and had consigned them to the dust. Only genius could have accomplished that.

Then Jesus turned to him and said, “‘You go and behave in the same way.” How? By treating men of all religions and races who were in need in the same way, that is as his neighbours. By acknowledging that all good men were his neighbours. By putting aside years of pride and prejudice and becoming a different man. He was demanding a life changing experience

Jesus left the deeper meaning of the story to be thought about by all who heard it. It had not only answered the question as to who his neighbour was, but it had answered his deeper question, how were men to obtain eternal life. For it had shown how men could inherit eternal life by recognising in the Good Samaritan a picture of the One Who came from Galilee seeking and saving the lost, and by putting themselves in His care.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The answer to Jesus" question was simple and obvious. The lawyer seems to have understood the point of the parable because he did not describe the true neighbor as the Samaritan but as the man who showed mercy. On the other hand he may have avoided the use of the word "Samaritan" out of disdain. Showing mercy was the key issue, not the nationality of the neighbor. Racial and religious considerations were irrelevant.

Jesus ended the encounter by commanding the lawyer to begin to follow the Samaritan"s example. This is what he needed to do if he wanted to earn eternal life (cf. Luke 10:25). If he treated everyone with whom he had any dealings with compassion and mercy, he would be loving his neighbor in the sense that God commanded ( Luke 10:27; Leviticus 19:18). Thus Jesus showed that the real test of love is action, not just profession (cf. James 2:15-16; 1 John 3:17-18). He also faced the lawyer with a humanly impossible obligation. Hopefully the man finally realized that and turned to Jesus for His justification ( Luke 10:29).

This parable obviously teaches that people should help other people who are in need when they encounter them, even though they may not have anything in common but their humanity. It is also a powerful polemic against prejudice and for compassion. Jesus Himself was the great example of the attitudes and actions that He advocated in this parable. The parallels between Jesus and the Samaritan are striking. However, it seems clear that Jesus did not give this parable to draw attention to Himself but to teach His disciples and the lawyer what it means to love one"s neighbor. They also learned that, properly understood, God"s demands are impossible to keep perfectly, so one must cast himself on God"s mercy if he hopes to obtain eternal life.

"The Parable implies not a mere enlargement of the Jewish ideas, but a complete change of them. It is truly a Gospel-Parable, for the whole old relationship of mere duty is changed into one of love. Thus, matters are placed on an entirely different basis from that of Judaism. The question now is not "Who is my neighbour?" but "Whose neighbour am I?"" [Note: Edersheim, 2:239.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-10.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:37. He that shewed mercy on him. The conclusion is irresistible, but the lawyer does not call him ‘the Samaritan.’

Go, and do thou likewise. The lawyer was taught how one really becomes the neighbor of another, namely, by active love, irrespective of nationality or religion. His question, ‘who is my neighbor,’ was answered: He to whom you ought thus to show mercy in order to become his neighbor, is your neighbor. The question is answered once for all. All are our neighbors, when we have thus learned what we owe to man as men.

The main lesson of the parable is one of philanthropy manifesting itself in humane, self-sacrificing acts, to all in need, irrespective of all other human distinctions. All through the Christian centuries, this lesson has been becoming more and more prominent; but has never of itself made men philanthropic. He who taught the lesson can and does give strength to put it into practice. In the highest sense our Lord alone has perfectly set forth the character of the Good Samaritan. The best example of what we call ‘humanity’ must necessarily be found in ‘the Son of man.’ The love of Christ is both the type and the source of this love to our neighbor. This truth has led to an allegorical interpretation of the parable. This interpretation, which has been a favorite from the early centuries, is suggestive and in accordance with revealed truth, though probably not the truth our Lord reveals here. According to this view, the traveller represents the race of Adam going from the heavenly city (Jerusalem) to the accursed one (Jericho; Joshua 6:26); the robbers, Satan and his agents; the state of the traveller, our lost and helpless condition by nature, ‘half-dead’ (being sometimes urged against the doctrine of human inability); the priest and Levite, the in efficacy of the law and sacrifice to help us; the Good Samaritan, our Lord, to whom the Jews had just said (John 8:48): ‘Say we not well that thou art a Samaritan, and hast a devil;’ the charge to the inn-keeper, the charge to His ministers, the promised return, the Second Advent. Some go further and make the inn represent the Church; the two denarii, the two sacraments, etc. Such analogies are not interpretations.—Finally, this parable refers to love of man as man, not Christian love of the brethren. A zeal for the latter, which overlooks the former, becomes Pharisaical. The parable, moreover, represents the humanity as exercised by one in actual doctrinal error, and the inhumanity by those who were nearer the truth, orthodox Jews. Our Lord could not mean to show how good deeds resulted from holding error and bad deeds from holding the truth; though such an inference is frequently forced on the passage. The Samaritan is brought in, not because of his theological views, but because he belonged to a race despised and hated by the Jews, so as to give point to a lesson meant for a Jew. At the same time our Lord does show us that one in speculative error may be practically philanthropic, and those holding proper religious theories may be really inhuman. The former is certainly the better man.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:37. , etc. If the lawyer was captious to begin with he is captious no longer. He might have been, for his question had not been directly (though very radically) answered. But the moral pathos of the “parable” has appealed to his better nature, and he quibbles no longer. But the prejudice of his class tacitly finds expression by avoidance of the word “Samaritan,” and the use instead of the phrase . Yet perhaps we do him injustice here, for the phrase really expresses the essence of neighbourhood, and so indicates not only who is neighbour but why. For the same phrase videLuke 1:58; Luke 1:72. This story teaches the whole doctrine of neighbourhood: first and directly, what it is to be a neighbour, viz., to give succour when and where needed; next, indirectly but by obvious consequence, who is a neighbour, viz., any one who needs help and whom I have opportunity and power to help, no matter what his rank, race, or religion may be: neighbourhood coextensive with humanity.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

on = with. Greek. meta. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.

And he said, He that showed mercy on him. He does not answer, 'The Samaritan'-that would have sounded heterodox, heretical-but "He that showed mercy on him." It comes to the same thing, no doubt, but the circumlocution is significant.

Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.

Remark: O exquisite, matchless teaching! What new fountains of charity has not this opened up in the human spirit-rivers in the wilderness, streams in the desert! what noble Christian Institutions have not such words founded, all undreamed of until that Divine One came to bless this heartless world of ours with His incomparable love-first in words, and then in deeds which have translated His words into flesh and blood, and poured the life of them through that humanity which He made His own! But was this parable designed merely to magnify the law of love, and show who fulfils it and who not? Is not the mind irresistibly directed to Him who, as our Brother Man, "our Neighbour" did this as never man did it? The priests and Levites, says Trench, had not strengthened the diseased, nor bound up the broken (Ezekiel 34:4), while He bound up the broken-hearted (Isaiah 61:1), and poured into all wounded spirits the balm of sweetest consolation. All the Church-fathers saw, through the thin veil of this noblest of stories, the Story of love, and never wearied of tracing the analogy, though sometimes fancifully enough. 'He hungered'-exclaims Gregory of Nazianzum, in the fourth century, in a passage of singular eloquence, in one of his Sermons-`but He fed thousands; He was weary, but He is the Rest of the weary; He is saluted "Samaritan" and "Demoniac," but He saves him that went down from Jerusalem and fell among thieves,' etc. More of this noble passage will be found at Luke 19:28-44, Remark 2, at the close of that section.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(37) Go, and do thou likewise.—This was the practical, though not the formal, answer to the question of the lawyer. If he acted in the spirit of the Samaritan, he would need no “nicely-calculated less or more” of casuistic distinctions as to who was and who was not his neighbour. Fellowship in the same human nature, and any kind of even passing contact, were enough to constitute a ground for neighbourly kindness. Of such a question it may be said, Solvitur amando. We love, and the problem presents no difficulty.

Nothing should lead us away from recognising this as the main lesson of the parable. But there is another application of it which, within limits, is legitimate enough as a development of thought, and which has commended itself to so many devout minds, both in ancient and modern times, that it at least deserves a notice. Christ Himself, it is said, is the great pattern of a wide, universal love for man as man, acting out the lesson which the parable teaches in its highest form. May we not think of Him as shadowed forth in the good Samaritan, as accepting, in that sense, the name which had been flung at Him in scorn? Starting from this thought, the circumstances fit in with a strange aptness. The traveller stands as representing mankind at large. The journey is from Jerusalem, the heavenly city, the paradise of man’s first estate, to Jericho, the evil and accursed city (Joshua 6:17), the sin into which man entered by yielding to temptation. The robbers are the powers of evil, who strip him of his robe of innocence and purity, who smite him sore, and leave him, as regards his higher life, half-dead. The priest and the Levite represent the Law in its sacrificial and ceremonial aspects, and they have no power to relieve or rescue. The Christ comes and helps where they have failed. The beast on which He rides is the human nature in which the Word dwelt, and it is upon that humanity of His that He bids us rest for comfort and support. The inn represents the visible Church of Christ, and the host its pastors and teachers; even the two pence, perhaps, the ordinances and means of grace committed to the Church. There is an obvious risk, in all such application, of an element that is fantastic and unreal; but the main line of parallelism seems to commend itself, if not to the reason, at least to the imagination of the devout interpreter.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.
He that
Proverbs 14:21; Hosea 6:6; Micah 6:8; Matthew 20:28; 23:23; 2 Corinthians 8:9; Ephesians 3:18,19; 5:2; Hebrews 2:9-15; Revelation 1:5
Go
6:32-36; John 13:15-17; 1 Peter 2:21; 1 John 3:16-18,23,24; 4:10,11
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 30:11 - gave him;  Mark 12:31 - Thou;  1 John 4:21 - General

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:37". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.