Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:4

Carry no money belt, no bag, no shoes; and greet no one on the way.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Minister, Christian;   Seventy;   Thompson Chain Reference - Haste;   Haste-Delay;   Purses;   The Topic Concordance - Despisement;   Disciples/apostles;   Evangelism;   Harvest;   Hate;   Healing;   Hearing;   Kingdom of God;   Labor;   Receiving;   Sending and Those Sent;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Missionary Work by Ministers;   Shoes;   Travellers;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Salutation;   Tithe;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Follow, Follower;   Mission;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Kings, the Books of;   Purse;   Salutation;   Scrip;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Kings, the Books of;   Salutation;   Sandal;   Scrip;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Bag;   Disciples;   Greeting;   Hospitality;   Luke, Gospel of;   Number Systems and Number Symbolism;   Salutation;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Bag, Purse, Wallet;   Canon of the New Testament;   Hospitality;   Jesus Christ;   Martha;   Mary;   Salutation;   Wealth;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Care ;   Courtesy;   Discourse;   Dominion (2);   Dress (2);   Greetings;   Hospitality;   Liberty (2);   Marks Stigmata;   Missions;   Organization (2);   Purse;   Seventy (2);   Wallet ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - New Testament;   Purse;   Salutation;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida;   Salute;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Purse,;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Bag;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Salutation;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Carry neither purse nor scrip - See on Matthew 10:9; (note), etc., and Mark 6:8; (note), etc.

Salute no man by the way - According to a canon of the Jews, a man who was about any sacred work was exempted from all civil obligations for the time; forasmuch as obedience to God was of infinitely greater consequence than the cultivation of private friendships, or the returning of civil compliments.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Purse … scrip … shoes - See the notes at Matthew 10:10.

Salute no man by the way - Salutations among the Orientals did not consist, as among us, of a slight bow or an extension of the hand, but was performed by many embraces and inclinations, and even prostrations of the body on the ground. All this required much “time;” and as the business on which the seventy were sent was urgent, they were required not to “delay” their journey by long and formal salutations of the persons whom they met. “If two Arabs of equal rank meet each other, they extend to each other the right hand, and having clasped, they elevate them as if to kiss them. Each one then draws back his hand and kisses it instead of his friend‘s, and then places it upon his forehead. The parties then continue the salutation by kissing each other‘s beard. They gave thanks to God that they are once more permitted to see their friend - they pray to the Almighty in his behalf. Sometimes they repeat not less than ten times the ceremony of grasping hands and kissing.”

It may also be added, in the language of Dr. Thomson (“The Land and the Book,” vol. i. p. 534), that “there is such an amount of insincerity, flattery, and falsehood in the terms of salutation prescribed by etiquette, that our Lord, who is truth itself, desired his representatives to dispense with them as far as possible, perhaps tacitly to rebuke them. These ‹instructions‘ were also intended to reprove another propensity which an Oriental can scarcely resist, no matter how urgent his business. If he meets an acquaintance, he must stop and make an endless number of inquiries and answer as many. If they come upon people making a bargain or discussing any other matter, they must pause and intrude their own ideas, and enter keenly into the business, though it in no wise concerns them; and more especially, an Oriental can never resist the temptation to assist “where accounts are being settled or money counted out.” The clink of coin has a positive fascination to them. Now the command of our Saviour strictly forbade all such loiterings. They would waste time, distract attention, and in many ways hinder the prompt and faithful discharge of their important mission.” The salutation of friends, therefore, was a ceremony which consumed much time; and it was on this account that our Lord on this occasion forbade them to delay their journey to greet others. A similar direction is found in 2 Kings 4:29.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-10.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Luke 10:4

Salute no man by the way

No time to be lost

“Salute no man by the way.
” It is remarkable that such an injunction should be given by our Divine Master, so distinguished as He was for amiable feelings and condescension, while at the same time He immediately added an exhortation to pay the usual courtesy, by desiring them, when they entered a house, to “salute the family.” The reason of this apparent inconsistency is easily discovered. In eastern countries, we are told, that salutations between travellers meeting on a journey are attended by so many questions, by so many expressions of welcome often repeated, and so many tedious forms, as seriously to retard their journey. Now, if such interruptions often occurred, as might be the case on a much-frequented road, the object of their journey might be in a great measure frustrated. When such despatch was required as our Saviour deemed necessary on this occasion, those tedious forms of customary civilities were to be omitted. It is true, that in the charge which our Saviour gave to the twelve, He uttered no prohibition to salute the travellers which they might meet with on the way. But it was properly given to the seventy disciples, because haste, which was not required at the mission of the twelve, was then become necessary
. (J. Thomson, D. D.)

Salutation

They were to waste no time on such ceremonies which were clearly excessive. We, however, are in no great danger of carrying the ceremony of salutation to excess. It befits us, therefore, to take heed how we minify even the few salutations which we have. “Good-bye” is all we have left of “God be with you”; for men are ashamed any longer to use that. Instead of the grand salutation, “God be with you,” you shall hear men who are parting say, “Well, old fellow, take care of yourself!” Men are substituting a course way of greeting and saluting each other, instead of giving those reverent, dignified, pleasure-giving, respect-inspiring salutations which belong to antiquity, and which should belong to every refined society--and to none so much as that which calls itself Christian. (H. W.Beecher.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Luke 10:4". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/luke-10.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Carry neither purse,.... The Syriac version reads, "purses, "to put money, gold, silver, and brass in; and the prohibition regards the money in the purse chiefly:

nor scrip; the Syriac version here also reads in the plural number, "scrips", to put victuals in, provisions or any sort for their journey, which they were not to carry with them, any more than money, to buy food with

Nor shoes; any more than those they had upon their feet; See Gill on Matthew 10:9, Matthew 10:10 and salute no man by the way; that they might not be retarded, and hindered in their journey by tedious ceremonies, and long inquiries into the health of persons and friends, and the business they were going about, and places where; and by discourses and confabulations, drawn out to great length, as was often the case at meeting on the road: and, for the same reason, a like charge is given to Gehazi, 2 Kings 4:29, and which, as the Jewish commentators on the place observeF1Jarchi, Kimchi, & R. Levi Ben Gersom in 2 Kings iv. 29. , was, that he might not multiply words with persons he met with, and might not be stopped by the way; and that his intention might be in his work, and his mind might not turn to any other thing, either by word or deed. So our Lord's intention, by this order was, not to teach them incivility, or to be morose and uncourteous; but that they might dispatch their business with the utmost expedition, and rather forego some common civilities and ceremonies, than to neglect, or, in the least, to hinder a work of so much importance they were sent about: and this was the more necessary, since, according to the Jewish maximF2Pirke Abot. c. 4. sect. 15. ,

"prevent every man with a salutation;'

they saluted all that they met, which took up time, and hindered business. Some sorts of persons indeed were excused, as those who were mournersF3T. Bab. in Misn. Moed Katon, c. 3. sect. 6. for the dead, and such as kept fasts for rainF4Misn. Taanith, c. 1. sect. 7. : but such were not these disciples; they neither mourned, nor fasted, nor could they, so long as the bridegroom was with them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Carry neither purse, nor scrip, nor shoes: and salute a no man by the way.

(a) This is spoken figuratively, which manner of speech men use when they put down more in words than is meant. This is usual among the Hebrews when they command a thing to be done speedily without delay, as is found in (2 Kings 4:29); for in any other case courteous and gentle salutations are matters of Christian duty: as for the calling, it was only for a limited time.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-10.html. 1599-1645.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

4. Carry neither purse, nor scrip, nor shoes: and salute no man by the way.

[Salute no man by the way.] I. We have a passage something like this elsewhere; "If thou meet any man, salute him not"; that is (as is commonly expounded), do not hinder thy journey by discoursing with any in the way. But the same reason doth not hold in this place; the business of these disciples not requiring such mighty expedition. They were commanded out two by two, to this or the other place or city where Christ himself was to come in person; nor was it necessary they should run in so great haste, that they should make no stay in the way. Only having appointed them to such and such places, their business indeed lay nowhere but in those very places to which they had been particularly sent, to proclaim the coming of Christ there, and not to be telling it in the way. The twelve apostles that were sent, their business was to declare the coming of the 'kingdom of heaven'; these the coming of the 'King himself.' No wonder, therefore, if the apostles were not forbidden to salute any in the way; for their province was, wherever they came, to tell the world that the kingdom of heaven was come: but these were only to give notice that the Messiah was coming: and that in those places only to which he was to come, and not to any whom they should meet cursorily in the way.

II. It was a very usual thing in that nation, upon some accounts, not to salute any in the way, no, not any person at all. "He that is mourning for the dead, let him not salute any person for the first seven days of his mourning." If thirteen fasts had been celebrated by order of the Sanhedrim for the imploring of rain, and yet no rain had fallen, then they "diminish from their business, and from building, and from planting, and from espousals and marriage, and from saluting each other as men under the rebukes of Heaven": that is, they abstained from all these things. "The religious do not use to salute one another; but if any of the common people do at any time salute them, they return it in a very low voice with all gravity, veiling themselves, and sitting in the posture of mourners or excommunicate persons."

Whether that of the apostle, "Salute one another with a holy kiss," might not have some reference to this usage, might be a matter for our inquiry, if there were place for it; but I forbear.

What therefore doth our Saviour intend by this prohibition, Salute no man by the way? would he imitate this Jewish custom, that he would have them taken for mourners everywhere?

I. He would have all that belonged to him conformable to himself, that every one from the quality of the messengers might, in some measure, judge what he was that sent them; as we have already hinted concerning the twelve apostles, He himself was "a man of sorrows"; and if his messengers do represent some such thing, either in their looks or behaviour, the people might the more easily guess what kind of person he was that commissioned them.

II. Christ had a twofold end in designing them to the places to which he in his own person had determined to come; namely, that thither all persons should assemble themselves to his doctrine for the healing of their souls: and that those that were diseased might be gathered thither in order to a cure. Now it was very fit and convenient that the behaviour of those that were to assemble the people to these ends should be mournful and solemn, to testify the fellow-feeling they had with the afflicted and miserable.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-10.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Purse (βαλλαντιονballantion). Old word for money-bag, sometimes a javelin as if from βαλλωballō Only in Luke in the N.T. (Luke 10:4; Luke 12:33; Luke 22:35). See note on Luke 9:3; notes on Mark 6:7.; and the notes on Matthew 10:9. for the other similar items.

Salute no man on the way (μηδενα κατα την οδον ασπασηστεmēdena kata tēn hodon aspasēsthe). First aorist (ingressive) middle subjunctive with μηδεναmēdena The peril of such wayside salutations was palaver and delay. The King‘s business required haste. Elisha‘s servant was not to tarry for salutations or salaams (2 Kings 4:29). These oriental greetings were tedious, complicated, and often meddlesome if others were present or engaged in a bargain.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Purse ( βαλλάντιον )

Used by Luke only. For money.

Scrip ( πήραν )

For victuals. Rev., wallet.

Shoes

Not that they were to go unshod, but that they were not to carry a change of sandals. See Deuteronomy 29:5; Deuteronomy 33:25.

Salute no man

Oriental salutations are tedious and complicated. The command is suited to a rapid and temporary mission. Compare 2 Kings 4:29. “These instructions were also intended to reprove another propensity which an Oriental can hardly resist, no matter how urgent his business. If he meets an acquaintance, he must stop and make an endless number of inquiries, and answer as many. If they come upon men making a bargain, or discussing any other matter, they must pause and intrude their own ideas, and enter keenly into the business, though it in nowise concerns them; and, more especially, an Oriental can never resist the temptation to assist when accounts are being settled or money counted out. The clink of coin has a positive fascination to them” (Thomson, “Land and Book”).

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Carry neither purse, nor scrip, nor shoes: and salute no man by the way.

Salute no man by the way — The salutations usual among the Jews took up much time. But these had so much work to do in so short a space, that they had not a moment to spare.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-10.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Carry no purse, no wallet, no shoes; and salute no man on the way1.

  1. And salute no man on the way. This was probably a common direction in cases of haste (2 Kings 4:29). Eastern salutations were tedious and overburdened with ceremony. Those in haste were excused from them.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

And salute no man by the way. This, and the other directions given, were not intended to be interpreted strictly and literally. This is proved by the fact that the expressions differ, as recorded by the different evangelists, and are even inconsistent with each other, if pressed to a strict interpretation. The meaning is, that they were to go as they were, without making any special preparation, and that they were to give their time and attention wholly to their work, and not engage in social enjoyments, and in the interchange of the courtesies of society, in the places they should visit. The object of this mission seems to have been to disseminate generally some authentic knowledge of the Savior's person and character as a messenger from heaven, and to call the attention of the community to the coming of the Messiah. They were not, however, instructed to say that Jesus was himself the Messiah. Like many of the other measures adopted by Jesus and the apostles, this mission of the seventy was suited to a local and temporary purpose, and is of course not of binding authority as a model for imitation.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-10.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

4 Carry neither purse, nor scrip, nor shoes: and salute no man by the way.

Ver. 4. Salute no man] For that your task is long, your time is little.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 10:4. And salute no man by the way. The instructions given to the seventy on this occasion, were nearly the same with those delivered to the twelve; concerning which, see the notes on Matthew 13. Only he ordered the seventy to spend no time in saluting such persons as they met on the road, the time assigned them for going through the cities being but short. The phrase salute no man by the way, implies the greatest dispatch, as is evident from 2 Kings 4:29. For the eastern salutations were exceedingly tedious,consisting of long wishes of happiness to the person saluted, and of very particular inquiries concerning his welfare.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-10.html. 1801-1803.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:4. Comp. Luke 9:3; Matthew 10:9.

βαλλάντιον] a purse; found only in Luke in the New Testament, frequently in the Greek writers. The spelling with λλ is decisively attested in the New Testament, although in itself the spelling with one λ would be more correct. See Stallbaum, ad Plat. Leg. I. p. 348 D.

μηδέναἀσπάσησθε] not a prohibition of the desire of good-will (Olshausen, B.-Crusius), or of making a bustle (as Lange conjectures), which would have to be found in the context, but which has opposed to it κατὰ τὴν ὁδόν; but a command to make haste, so as to avoid every delay upon the road that might not be necessary for the performance of their task. In this respect there is no need of any reference to the circumstantial modes of greeting (embraces, benedictions, kisses, and the like). Comp. 2 Kings 4:29. Jesus impresses on them the properare ad rem! in accordance with the object of the mission, Luke 10:1; Luke 10:9, and in a concrete form, which should not be pressed to a literal meaning. Theophylact well says: διὰ τὸ μὴ ἀποσχολεῖσθαι περὶ ἀνθρωπίνους ἀσπασμοὺς καὶ φιλοφρονήσεις, καὶ ἐκ τούτου πρὸς τὸ κήρυγμα ἐμποδίζεσθαι.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:4. ΄ηδένα κατὰ τὴν ὁδὸν ἀσπάσησθε, salute no man by the way) It is not inappropriate, that this should be understood literally. He who is engaged in a very serious and sudden emergency, has it less in his power to observe ceremonies of etiquette, and is readily exempted from the ordinary rules of politeness. Comp. 2 Kings 4:29, and in a similar case, Luke 19:30, et seqq. There were various classes of men among the Jews exempted from the duty of salutations, especially religious men (men exercising some religious function), as Lightfoot shows. They used to salute [in the East, and still salute] with many formal words and gestures; but by omitting these words (by silence), the sincerity of the mind is retained: and the time of these envoys was very precious (comp. John 20:17); very precious too [i.e. not to be indiscriminately thrown away on every one] was a salutation on the part of the envoys: see following verse, and Matthew 10:12. Hearers are more attentive in their home than on the way-side; and salutations by the way might deprive the envoys, who were so many in number, of a considerable portion of time. [In fine, even the very omission of salutations by the way in a useful manner admonished men, that the business of the Seventy was a weighty one, and one which required mature despatch.—V. g.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 10:4"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

ни мешка, ни сумы, ни обуви Т.е. идти без багажа. Это не означает, что они будут босыми. См. пояснение к 9:3.

никогоне приветствуйте В той культуре приветствие было сложной церемонией, включающей много формальностей, возможно даже угощение, и в связи с этим долгие задержки (см. пояснение к 11:43). Человек, выполняющий чрезвычайно срочное поручение, освобождался от подобных формальностей и его не считали грубым. В наставлениях Иисуса все говорит о недостатке времени и большой срочности поручения.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-10.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Purse-scrip; Matthew 10:9-10.

Salute no man; the mode of salutation then was more formal than now. He would not have them hindered by giving or receiving salutations, but would have them proceed directly to their work.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Carry no purse, no food bag, no shoes, and salute no man on the way.”

They are to go out in haste, trusting fully in God’s provision, and not wasting time on conventional greetings which in those days could be long and time consuming, nor in idle chatter (compare 2 Kings 4:29 for a similar idea). They are to be recognised as King’s Messengers, with their concentration set on reaching out with the Good News. All would thereby recognise the urgency of their mission and the importance of their message. And they are to be seen as having no love of possessions. Men will listen to them and respect them because they are like the prophets before them, and are not seeking for money to fill their purses. Similar restrictions were applied to the Essenes.

‘Carry -- no shoes’ indicates that they are not to carry spares. It is interesting that in the Talmud carrying all these things was also forbidden on the Temple Mount, although there too they could wear sandals. Carrying luggage would distract from the main purpose of their being there.

‘Salute no man on the way.’ It was recognised that a messenger in a hurry would not greet people (compare 2 Kings 4:29), for once he had done so he might be involved in a long delay. Courtesy demanded that the greeting be accompanied by the social niceties which could become extended (consider Judges 19:4-9 where the attitude is exemplified).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The mission of the Seventy would be relatively brief, so they needed to travel lightly (cf. Luke 9:3; Mark 6:8). The implication of their not carrying a purse was that they should depend on the hospitality and gifts of believers to sustain them, but most importantly on God. In ancient Near Eastern culture people often gave very long greetings that tied them up sometimes for days (cf. Judges 19:4-9; 2 Kings 4:29). Jesus did not mean that His disciples should be unfriendly or unsociable but that they should not allow these greetings to divert them from their mission. They were to pursue their work and not waste their time on lesser things.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-10.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:4. Salute no man by the way. Peculiar to this discourse. It simply expresses the urgency of their errand, since such salutations in the East would involve great loss of time.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:4. , a purse, in Lk. only, in N. T.; often in classics, spelt there, as in MSS. of N. T., variously with one or two .— : salute no one, to be taken in the spirit rather than in the letter; hyperbolical for: be exclusively intent on your business: “negotio quod imposui vobis incumbite, praeterhabitis vel brevissimis obstaculis et moramentis,” Pricaeus. Weiss (Mt.-Evangel.) thinks the prohibition is directed against carrying on their mission on the way. It was to be exclusively a house-mission (videMatthew 10:12, where occurs).

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Moses formerly chose twelve elders as princes and fathers of the twelve tribes of Israel, and afterwards gave to each of these elders six others, to assist them in the arduous work of governing the people, so our divine Saviour chose twelve apostles to govern his Church. He likewise afterwards gave six disciples to each apostle, which makes 72, to serve as priests, and assist in governing the Church. (Tirinus) --- Salute no man, i.e. go forwards promptly, and do not stay to amuse yourselves with vain compliments and useless civilities towards those whom you meet. This was a proverb. Eliseus said the same to Giezi, when he sent him to restore life to the child of the widow of Sunamis. If any man meet you, salute him not; think of nothing but of executing the orders I give you. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

neither = not. Greek. me. App-105.

purse. Greek balantion. Peculiar to Luke; only here; Luke 12:33.; Luke 22:35, Luke 22:36.

nor. Greek me.

scrip = a beggar"s collecting bag. See on Matthew 10:10.

nor. Greek. mede.

shoes = sandals: i.e. a second pair or change.

salute = greet. In Luke only here and Luke 1:40.

no man. Greek. medeis.

by. Greek. kata. App-104.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Carry neither purse, nor scrip.—See Notes on Matthew 10:9-10; Mark 6:8.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Carry neither purse, nor scrip, nor shoes: and salute no man by the way.
neither
9:3-6; 22:35; Matthew 10:9,10; Mark 6:8,9
and
9:59,60; Genesis 24:33,56; 1 Samuel 21:8; 2 Kings 4:24,29; Proverbs 4:25
Reciprocal: Judges 18:15 - saluted him;  Matthew 5:47 - salute;  Mark 16:8 - neither;  John 20:17 - Touch

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.