Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:8

Whatever city you enter and they receive you, eat what is set before you;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Minister, Christian;   Seventy;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Eating;   Food;   Food, Physical-Spiritual;   Temperance;   The Topic Concordance - Despisement;   Disciples/apostles;   Evangelism;   Harvest;   Hate;   Healing;   Hearing;   Kingdom of God;   Labor;   Receiving;   Sending and Those Sent;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Missionary Work by Ministers;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Tithe;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Follow, Follower;   Mission;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel According to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Disciples;   Hospitality;   Luke, Gospel of;   Number Systems and Number Symbolism;   Repentance;   Salutation;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the New Testament;   Jesus Christ;   Martha;   Mary;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Discourse;   Dominion (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - New Testament;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Bill;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);  

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you.

Found only in Luke, this admonition was especially appropriate in view of the Gentile character of the area (Trans-Jordan) where the seventy were sent. Even many of the Jews in that area were not very scrupulous in observing the restrictions imposed by their law; and, as those restrictions were shortly to disappear altogether in the approaching kingdom, there could have been nothing gained by Jesus' messengers making any big point of their observance. Other New Testament passages bearing on this question are 1 Corinthians 9:7; 1 Timothy 4:8; 1 Corinthians 10:27; and Matthew 15:10-20. The seventy were thus instructed "to eat what they were served without causing inconvenience to their host by requiring `kosher' food."[12]

ENDNOTE:

[12] Ibid., p. 128.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And into whatsoever city ye enter,.... Into whatsoever house in it ye go, and apply to for lodging and entertainment,

and they receive you, readily and cheerfully,

eat such things as are set before you; though ever so mean, accept of them, and do not object to them on that account, lest it should be thought you serve your own bellies, and seek to gratify your appetites; nor, on the other hand, do not think anything too good for you, or that you are burdensome and chargeable, but eat as if it were your own; nor ask questions about the cleanness and uncleanness of it, or whether it has been tithed or not; but feed upon it without any scruple.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, d eat such things as are set before you:

(d) Be content with the food that is set before you.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-10.html. 1599-1645.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

8. And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you:

[Eat such things as are set before you.] The traditional canons were so very precise and curious about not eating unless what were clean, what had been duly tithed, and from which the Trumah had been duly separated, that it might be almost a wonder the strict traditionists should not be famished if they lived and fed only by canon. "Let not the religious serve at the table of a laic, unless all things be rightly prepared and decimated."

From the irksomeness and perplexity of this niceness doth our Saviour acquit and absolve his followers; partly that he might introduce the gospel liberty; partly also consulting the necessity of his disciples, who if they had been bound up to that strictness in meats, what could they do when their converse was to lie chiefly amongst persons perfectly unknown to them?

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-10.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Such things as are set before you (τα παρατιτεμενα υμινta paratithemena humin). The things placed before you from time to time (present passive participle, repetition). Every preacher needs this lesson of common politeness. These directions may seem perfunctory and even commonplace, but every teacher of young preachers knows how necessary they are. Hence they were given both to the Twelve and to the Seventy.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

8 And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you:

Ver. 8. Such things as they set before you] Not seeking after dainties. It becomes not a servant of the Highest to be a slave to his palate. Epicurei, dum palate prospiciunt, coeli palatium non suspiciunt, saith the heathen. (Cicero).

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 8-12. We have met with the same instructions before in Matthew and Mark. See Poole on "Matthew 10:11", and following verses to Matthew 10:15. See Poole on "Mark 6:10", See Poole on "Mark 6:11". There is some difference in words. Matthew saith, —inquire who in the city is worthy, and, Luke 10:13,

if the house be worthy; Luke saith,

if the son of peace be there; they both mean the same thing: if there be any in it, that belong to God’s election of grace, any whom God intends by you to call, and make partakers of the peace of the gospel. For other things relating to the opening of the words, see the notes before mentioned. Only we may from hence observe for our instruction,

1. That it is the will of Christ, that his ministers should not be too solicitous for a livelihood. As the labourer is worthy of his hire, so he that sends them into his harvest will see they shall be fed. Let them look to their calling, and to the fulfilling of their ministry; God will see they shall be fed.

2. That the society of ministers of the gospel, in cities and houses, should not be with debauchees, but with those that are worthy, so far as man can judge; such as are their Master’s friends and servants should be their companions.

3. Those are most worthy in places amongst whom the Son of peace is, men and women that have the most knowledge of and love for Christ.

4. The ministers of Christ ought to carry themselves with all imaginable civility, wishing good to all, and doing good to all.

5. Christ’s ministers ought not to make their bellies their gods, —eat such things as are set before you.

6. They have a Divine licence to take and use for their necessities such things as men give them.

7. Christ expects that his people should maintain his ministers, not depriving the labourers of their hire, nor muzzling the mouths of the oxen which tread out the corn, 1 Corinthians 9:9,10, nor preferring their servants for their worldly occasions before such as labour for their souls, and in that work are God’s messengers to them, and his servants in the first place, though employed in watching for people’s souls.

8. The not giving a livelihood to ministers, is a not receiving them, that is, provided the people be able.

9. People by not receiving the gospel of peace brought them by faithful ministers shall do them no hurt, their peace shall return unto them. They shall be a sweet savour unto God, even as to them that perish. Their judgment is with the Lord, and their work with their God, though they labour in vain; though Israel be not gathered, they shall be glorified. Men proportion their rewards according to successes of servants. God more justly proportions his rewards to men’s sincerity and diligence in their labour.

10. If men refuse the gospel, yet they shall know the kingdom of God is come nigh unto them. If they will not be subject to his kingdom of grace, yet they shall be subdued by the kingdom of his power and justice.

11. There will come a day when men that have the offers of the gospel of peace, and refuse them, slighting and despising his ministers and their message, will find that they had better have lived in Sodom when it was burnt with fire and brimstone; their portion of wrath in the day of judgment will be larger and bitterer than the portion of the men of Sodom. Let all who live in our days hear and fear, and in time break off their sins by a true repentance, lest they go to hell at the highest disadvantage.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Taken broadly the food set before the disciples in whatever town they might visit could possibly include ceremonially unclean food. Jesus was already dispensing with the clean unclean distinction in foods (cf. Luke 11:41; Mark 7:19; Romans 10:4). Peter"s scrupulous observance of the Jewish dietary laws may not have characterized all the disciples (cf. Acts 10:14). The practice of eating "unclean" food continued to disturb the early church (cf1Corinthians8). Undoubtedly Luke included this reference with his original readers in mind.

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Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-10.html. 2012.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:8. : not a repetition. It means, be contented with your fare: contenti este quamvis frugali apparatu, Bengel. Holtz. (H. C.) thinks Lk. has in view heathen houses, and that the meaning is: put aside Jewish scruples.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

ye enter = ye may enter (with Greek. an).

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Eat such things as are set before you.—The precise form of the precept is peculiar to St. Luke, but the spirit is the same as that of the words which had been spoken to the Twelve. The Evangelist preachers were to accept whatever was provided for them by a willing host, and to avoid even the appearance of caring for outward comforts.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you:
and
10; 9:48; Matthew 10:40; John 13:20
eat
1 Corinthians 10:27
Reciprocal: Matthew 10:11 - and there;  Mark 6:10 - GeneralLuke 12:29 - seek;  Acts 28:8 - and healed;  2 Corinthians 7:2 - Receive

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.