Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 16:12

And if you have not been faithful in the use of that which is another's, who will give you that which is your own?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Faithfulness;   Jesus, the Christ;   Probation;   Servant;   Worldliness;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Breach of Trust;   Business Life;   Faithfulness-Unfaithfulness;   Unfaithfulness;   Vices;   The Topic Concordance - Faith/faithfulness;   Unjustness;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Faithfulness;   Servants;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Parables;   Wealth;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies;   Wealth;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Almsgiving ;   Asceticism (2);   Bank;   Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Common Life;   Discourse;   Faithfulness (2);   Intercession ;   Mammon;   Manuscripts;   Paradox;   Selfishness;   Spiritualizing of the Parables;   Steward, Stewardship;   Wealth (2);   Winter ;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Bible, the;   Lazarus;   Steward;   Trade;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

That which is another man's - Or rather another's, τῳ αλλοτριω . That is, worldly riches, called another's:

  1. Because they belong to God, and he has not designed that they should be any man's portion.
  • Because they are continually changing their possessors, being in the way of commerce, and in providence going from one to another.
  • This property of worldly goods is often referred to by both sacred and profane writers. See a fine passage in Horace, Sat. l. ii. s. 2. v. 129.

    Nam propriae telluris herum natura neque illum,

    Nec me, nec quemquam statuit

    Nature will no perpetual heir assign,

    Nor make the farm his property, or mine.

    Francis

    And the following in one of our own poets: -

    "Who steals my purse steals trash; 'tis something, nothing;

    'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands."

    That which is your own? - Grace and glory, which God has particularly designed for you; which are the only proper satisfying portion for the soul, and which no man can enjoy in their plenitude, unless he be faithful to the first small motions and influences of the Divine Spirit.

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    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-16.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    Another man‘s - The word “man‘s” is not in the original. It is, “If ye have been unfaithful managers for another.” It refers, doubtless, to “God.” The wealth of the world is “his.” It is committed to us as his stewards. It is uncertain and deceitful, and at any moment he can take it away from us. It is still “his;” and if, while intrusted with “this,” we are unfaithful, we cannot expect that he will confer on us the rewards of heaven.

    That which is your own - The riches of heaven, which, if once given to us, may be considered as “ours” - that is, it will be permanent and fixed, and will not be taken away “as if” at the pleasure of another. We may “calculate” on it, and look forward with the assurance that it will “continue” to be “ours” forever, and will not be taken away like the riches of this world, “as if” they were not ours. The meaning of the whole parable is, therefore, thus expressed: If we do not use the things of this world as we ought - with honesty, truth, wisdom, and integrity, we cannot have evidence of piety, and shall not be received into heaven. If we are true to that which is least, it is an evidence that we are the children of God, and he will commit to our trust that which is of infinite importance, even the eternal riches and glory of heaven.

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    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-16.html. 1870.

    Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

    And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another's, who will give you that which is your own?

    See under preceding verse, where the same thought is given a little differently.

    This verse lays down, unqualifiedly, a law which makes the right use of one's possession a condition of eternal life, for giving unto a man of that "which is your own" can mean nothing if not eternal life. Concepts like "accepting Christ," "surrendering to Christ," and "taking up the cross," etc., are meaningless unless related to the use of one's material possessions.

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    Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
    Bibliographical Information
    Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's,.... Which is not a man's own, but what is committed to him by another; בממון אחרים, "with the mammon of othersF1Jarchi in Pirke Abot, c. 5, sect. 13. ", to speak in the language of the Jews; and of mammon, our Lord is speaking, and here of another man's, of which they were only stewards, as he in the preceding parable was: hence we readF2T. Hieros. Succa, fol. 53. 1. of שומרי ממון, "keepers of mammon", who were intrusted with another's substance; and such are here supposed, which, if unfaithful in,

    who shall give you that which is your own? that is, should you unjustly detain, or make an ill use of another man's substance lodged in your hands, how can you expect but that you will be dealt with in like manner by others, who will not pay you yours, they have in their possession, but convert it to their own use? A like distinction of another's and a man's own, may be observed among the Jews:

    "there are (say theyF3Pirke Abot, c. 5. sect. 13. ,) four sorts of men in respect of giving alms; he that would give, but would not have others give, his eye is evil, בשל אחרים, "in that which is other men's" (i.e. as the commentator observesF4Jarchi in ib. , lest the goods of others should be increased, and they get a good name); he that would that others should give, but he will not give himself, his eye is evil, בשלו, "in that which is his own"; he that gives, and would have others give, he is a "good man"; he that neither gives, nor would have others give, he is an "ungodly man";'

    see Romans 5:7. Interpreters generally understand by "that which is another man's", in the first clause, the things of this world, which men are possessed of, because these are not of themselves, but from another, from God; and they are but stewards, rather than proprietors of them; and they are for the good of others, and not for themselves; and are not lasting, but in a little while will pass from them to others: and by "that which is your own", they understand the good things of grace and glory, which, when once bestowed on man, are his own property, and for his own use, and will never be alienated from him, but will always abide with him: but if he is unfaithful in the former, how should he expect the latter to be given to him?

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    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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    Bibliographical Information
    Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-16.html. 1999.

    Geneva Study Bible

    And if ye have not been faithful in that which is f another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?

    (f) In worldly goods, which are called other men's because they are not ours, but rather entrusted to our care.
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    Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-16.html. 1599-1645.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

    another man‘s … your own — an important turn to the subject. Here all we have is on trust as stewards, who have an account to render. Hereafter, what the faithful have will be their own property, being no longer on probation, but in secure, undisturbed, rightful, everlasting possession and enjoyment of all that is graciously bestowed on us. Thus money is neither to be idolized nor despised: we must sit loose to it and use it for God‘s glory.

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    This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
    Bibliographical Information
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-16.html. 1871-8.

    John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

    12. And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?

    [If ye have not been faithful in that which was another man's, &c.] To apply another man's to that wealth which is given us by God, is something harsh and obscure; but to apply it to the riches of other men, makes the sense a little more easy: "If ye have been unjust in purloining the goods of other men, and will still as unjustly keep them back, what reason have you to think that others will not deal as unjustly with you, and keep back even what is yours?"

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    Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-16.html. 1675.

    Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

    That which is your own (το μετερονto hūmeteron). But Westcott and Hort read το ημετερονto hēmeteron (our own) because of B L Origen. The difference is due to itacism in the pronunciation of hū - and ηhē alike (long i). But the point in the passage calls for “yours” as correct. Earthly wealth is ours as a loan, a trust, withdrawn at any moment. It belongs to another (ιen tōi allotriōi). If you did not prove faithful in this, who will give you what is really yours forever? Compare “rich toward God” (Luke 12:21).

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    The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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    Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-16.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

    Vincent's Word Studies

    That which is another's

    God's. Riches are not ours, but given us in trust.

    Your own

    Equivalent to the true riches. That which forms part of our eternal being - the redeemed self. Compare the parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:20), where the life or soul is distinguished from thepossessions. “Thy soul shall be required; whose shall the wealth be?” Compare, also, rich toward God (Luke 12:21). Chrysostom, cited by Trench, says of Abraham and Job, “They did not serve mammon, but possessed and ruled themselves, and were masters, and not servants.”

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    Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-16.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?

    If ye have not been faithful in that which was another's — None of these temporal things are yours: you are only stewards of them, not proprietors: God is the proprietor of all; he lodges them in your hands for a season: but still they are his property. Rich men, understand and consider this. If your steward uses any part of your estate (so called in the language of men) any farther or any otherwise than you direct, he is a knave: he has neither conscience nor honour. Neither have you either one or the other, if you use any part of that estate, which is in truth God's, not yours, any otherwise than he directs.

    That which is your own — Heaven, which when you have it, will be your own for ever.

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    Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-16.html. 1765.

    The Fourfold Gospel

    And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another's, who will give you that which is your own1?

    1. And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another's, who will give you that which is your own? We are all God's stewards, and the perishing possessions of earth are not our own, but that which is given us "forever" is "our own". See 1 Corinthians 3:22.

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    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
    Bibliographical Information
    J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-16.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    12 And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man’s, who shall give you that which is your own?

    Ver. 12. In that which is another man’s] Riches are not properly ours, but God’s, who hath intrusted us, and who doth usually assign them to the wicked, those men of his hand, for their portion, Psalms 17:14, for all the heaven that they are ever to look for. Better things abide the saints, who are here but foreigners, and must do as they may.

    Who shall give you that which is your own?] Quod nec eripi nec surripi potest. Aristotle relateth a law like this made by Theodectes, that he that used not another man’s horse well should forfeit his own.

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    Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-16.html. 1865-1868.

    Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

    Luke 16:12. That which is another man's, Here, as in many of our Lord's discourses, the expression is so simple, and the sense so profound, that we need not wonder at its being overlooked. Our translation has supplied the word man without reason; for it is not man, but God, who is intended; to whom the riches and other advantages in our possession do properly belong; who has committed them to us only as stewards, to be laid out for the good of his family, and who may every moment call us to give an account of our management. The words that which is your own, do not signify that which is already our own, but that which is to be so: that, which, when it is conferred upon us, shall be wholly in our power, and perpetually in our possession; shall be so fully our own, that weshall never be called to account for the management of it. Our Lord's meaning therefore is, "If you have dared to be unfaithful in that which was only a trust committed to you by God for a short time, and of which you knew you were to give him an account; it is evident, that you are not fit to be entrusted by him with the riches of heaven,—these being treasures, which, ifhe bestowed them on you, would be so fully your own, that you would have them perpetually in your possession, and never be called to an account for your management of them." This verse is well expressed, though not exactly rendered in the version of 1729; If you have embezzled what another gave you in trust, how can he give you an estate in perpetuity? Probably our Lord may allude to a custom of rewarding faithful stewards, by giving them some part of the estates which they had managed.

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    Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-16.html. 1801-1803.

    Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

    Luke 16:12. ἀλλοτρίῳ, that which is another’s) In the case of the external goods of the world, in the food needed for the belly. See 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Timothy 6:7. In a different point of view it is carnal things, not spiritual, which are called our own, 1 Corinthians 9:11 [If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap your carnal things?]. Nay, indeed, all the good things of God are alien to a man, before that he becomes a believer, even those which are inferior and prior to the rest: but when a man has become a believer, all things become his own, even the greatest and the highest goods.— τὸ ὑμέτερον, that which is your own) that which belongs to the sons and heirs of God: ch. Luke 6:20 [“Yours is the Kingdom of God”] 1 Corinthians 3:22 [“All things are yours,” etc.]. It virtually and in fact refers to the same thing as τὸ ἀληθινὸν, the true good, Luke 16:11.— ὑμῖν, unto you) This implies that he who fails to obtain salvation, might nevertheless have obtained it.— δώσει, will give) The verb πιστεύσει, will commit, corresponds to the noun τὸ ἀληθινὸν, Luke 16:11, and refers solely to this life, during which is the time of probation; the verb δώσει, will give, corresponds to the pronoun τὸ ὑμέτερον, that which is your own, and refers especially to the future life, in which there is no risk of faithlessness. Wherefore inasmuch as in the case of the one world faithlessness has place, but has not in the other, the cause why the true goods are not to be committed to those who have not evinced fidelity in the case of the unjust mammon, is the truth and exalted worth of the things which must not be exposed to any risk; and the cause why the goods which are their own, are not to be given to those who have not evinced faithfulness in the case of the goods which belong to another, is the unworthiness of those who had been intended to receive them as their own,—that unworthiness incapacitating them for so great an inheritance. No man can with the one and the same earnestness administer both things that are ‘unrighteous’ and things that are ‘true:’ or enjoy with one and the same soul both the things “that belong to another,” and the things that are “his own.”

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    Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-16.html. 1897.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    Let it be questioned whether allotrion might not have been translated foreign as well as another man’s, for so interpreters expound that phrase: If you have not been faithful in things that are without you, which are little, compared with things that are within us. Yet riches are indeed properly not ours, we are but the stewards of them, and part of them are other men’s, and only trusted into our hands, to dispense to them according to our Master’s order. Grace is our own, especially justifying and sanctifying grace; because it is given us of God solely for our own use and advantage. We use to say, That those who have been, bad servants seldom prove good masters. In the trust of our riches we are but servants; God will not give out of his special saving grace to those that abuse the trust of his common gifts and grace.

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    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 16:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-16.html. 1685.

    Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

    в чужом Буквально «в том, что принадлежит другому». Это ссылка на обладающего всеми богатствами Бога и верующих, которые располагают этим богатством только как управляющие.

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    MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-16.html.

    Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

    Not been faithful; if not honest as stewards in what God committed to you for time, no one will give you heavenly riches for eternity.

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    Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-16.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    12.That which is another man’s—This other man, in the parable, is the landlord. With probationary man, it is God. Nothing earthly is our own if we are stewards. Nothing is ours, because everything is but in our momentary possession. Everything is like the snowflake upon our warm palm; it vanishes as the snowflake to the air, back to the God who gave it.

    That which is your own—The permanent and the eternal, which is not lent for a time, but given for endless ages, is our own. According then as we have faithfully dealt with what God has temporarily lent, so will he bestow on us eternal possessions.

     

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    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-16.html. 1874-1909.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    And if you have not been faithful in that which is another's: so again is called false worldly wealth, which passeth from one to another; so that it cannot be called a man's own, who will give you that which is your own? i.e. how can you hope that God will bestow upon you, or commit to your care, spiritual riches or gifts, which, when rightly managed, would by your own for all eternity? See St. Augustine, lib. ii. qq. Evang. q. 35. p. 263. (Witham) --- That which is another's. Temporal riches may be said to belong to another, because they are the Lord's; and we have only the dispensing of them: so that when we give alms, we are liberal of another's goods. But if we are not liberal in giving what is another's, how shall we be so in giving our own? Nothing one would have thought so properly belonged to the Jews, as the kingdom of heaven, the preaching of the gospel, and the knowledge of heavenly things. But they were deprived of all for their infidelity in the observance of the law, which was first intrusted to them. (Calmet)

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    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-16.html. 1859.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    another man"s = a foreigner"s. Compare Acts 7:6 and Hebrews 11:9 ("strange "), and Matthew 17:25, Matthew 17:26 ("stranger "). Greek. allotrios (App-124.)

    your own. Greek. humeteros. But, though all themodern critical texts (except WH and Rm) read it thus, yet the primitive text must have read hemeteros = ours, or our own; for it is the reading of "B "(the Vatican MS.) and, before this or any other Greek MS. extant, Origen (186-253), Tertullian (second cent.), read hemon--ours; while Theophylact (1077), and Euthymius (twelfth cent.), with B (the Vatican MS.) read hemeteros = our own, in contrast with "foreigners "in preceding clause. See note on 1 John 2:2. This makes true sense; otherwise it is unintelligible.

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    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-16.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?

    And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's - the pecuniary and other earthly means which are but lent us, and must be held at best as only entrusted to us,

    Who shall give you that which is your own? This verse gives an important turn to the subject. Here all we have is on trust as stewards, who have an account to render. Hereafter, what the faithful have will be their own property, being no longer on probation, but in secure, undisturbed, rightful, everlasting possession and enjoyment of all that is graciously bestowed on us. Thus money is neither to be idolized nor despised: we must sit loose to it, but use it for God's glory.

    No servant can serve (or, be entirely at the command of) two masters. This is true even where there is no hostility between them: how much more where they are in deadly opposition! For either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon. This shows that the two masters here intended are such as are in uncompromising hostility to each other. (See on the same saying in the Sermon on the Mount, Matthew 6:24.)

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    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-16.html. 1871-8.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (12) If ye have not been faithful in that which is another man’s . . .—The ruling idea of the verse is clearly that which the parable had enforced, that in relation to all external possessions and advantages we are stewards and not possessors. The Roman poet had seen that to boast of such things was the emptiest of all vanities—

    “At genus, et proavos, et quæ non fecimus ipsi,

    Vix ea nostra voco.”

    [“ Lineage and name, and all that our own powers

    Have not wrought for us, these I scarce call ours.”]

    That which is your own?—This is obviously identical with the “true riches” of the preceding verse. Wisdom, holiness, peace, these the world has not given, and cannot take away; and even looking to God as the great Giver of these as of other good and perfect gifts, it may be said that they are bestowed by Him as a possession in fee, the reward of the faithful stewardship of all lower gifts and opportunities, so that, though His gift, they become, in very deed, our own.

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    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-16.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?
    in
    19:13-26; 1 Chronicles 29:14-16; Job 1:21; Ezekiel 16:16-21; Hosea 2:8; Matthew 25:14-29
    that which is your
    10:42; Colossians 3:3,4; 1 Peter 1:4,5
    Reciprocal: Proverbs 8:18 - durable;  Luke 16:6 - Take;  Luke 16:10 - faithful in;  2 Corinthians 6:10 - and

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    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-16.html.

    Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

    12.And if you have not been faithful in what belongs to another. By the expression, what belongs to another, he means what is not within man; for God does not bestow riches upon us on condition that we shall be attached to them, but makes us stewards of them in such a manner, that they may not bind us with their chains. And, indeed, it is impossible that our minds should be free and disengaged for dwelling in heaven, if we did not look upon every thing that is in the world as belonging to another

    Who shall entrust to you what is your own? Spiritual riches, on the other hand, which relate to a future life, are pronounced by him to be our own, because the enjoyment of them is everlasting. But now he employs a different comparison. There is no reason, he tells us, to expect that we shall make a proper and moderate use of our own property, if we have acted improperly or unfaithfully in what belonged to another. Men usually care less about abusing, and allow themselves greater liberty in squandering, their own property, because they are not afraid that any person will find fault with them; but when a thing has been entrusted to them either in charge or in loan, and of which they must afterwards render an account, they are more cautious and more timid.

    We thus ascertain Christ’s meaning to be, that they who are bad stewards of earthly blessings would not be faithful guardians of spiritual gifts. He next introduces a sentence: You cannot serve God and mammon; which I have explained at Matthew 6:24. There the reader will find an explanation of the word Mammon (301)

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    Bibliographical Information
    Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:12". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-16.html. 1840-57.