Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 16:14

Now the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, were listening to all these things and were scoffing at Him.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covetousness;   Infidelity;   Rich, the;   Scoffing;   Self-Righteousness;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Covetousness;   Derision;   Despised, Christ;   Liberality-Parsimony;   Sufferings of Christ;   The Topic Concordance - Covetousness;   Justification;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Covetousness;   Pharisees, the;   Scorning and Mocking;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Pharisees;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Justification;   Parables;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Money;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Pharisees;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Scoffer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Covetousness;   Discourse;   Endurance;   Gospels (2);   Mammon;   Steward, Stewardship;   Toleration, Tolerance;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - 5 Covetousness Love of Money;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pharisees;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Bible, the;   Covetousness;   Lover;   Money, Love of;   Person of Christ;   Scribes;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

They derided him - Or rather, They treated him with the utmost contempt. So we may translate the original words εξεμυκτηριζον αυτον, which literally signifies, in illum emunxerunt - but must not be translated into English, unless, to come a little near it, we say, they turned up their noses at him; and why! Because they were lovers of money, and he showed them that all such were in danger of perdition. As they were wedded to this life, and not concerned for the other, they considered him one of the most absurd and foolish of men, and worthy only of the most sovereign contempt, because he taught that spiritual and eternal things should be preferred before the riches of the universe. And how many thousands are there of the very same sentiment to the present day!

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-16.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things; and they scoffed at him.

CONNECTIVE TEACHING

Lovers of money ... One finds it simply impossible to understand why some commentators strive to question a statement of this kind. Ray Summers, for example, implied that the other synoptics do not fully support Luke's charge here that the Pharisees were lovers of money; but he neglected to explain why the sacred historian needed any such support. If there had not been another word in the whole New Testament regarding this, Luke's statement here is more than enough to guarantee the unqualified truth of it. Summers went on to remark concerning the passage in Matthew 23:14 (KJV), in which the Pharisees were charged with devouring "widow's houses," that "It is not in the best manuscripts, so it can be used only in a qualified support of Luke's statement."[25] He evidently overlooked the fact that in that same chapter (Matthew 23:26), Matthew quoted Jesus Christ as saying that the cup and platter of the Pharisees were "full of extortion," the same being a total endorsement of what Luke said about the Pharisees here. His error, however, is not in overlooking such a confirmation of Luke's words, but in supposing that the record of two or more Gospels is more authentic than the statement of only one of them. The thesis maintained in this commentary is that each of the Gospels is totally reliable in all that they contain.

Over and beyond Luke's statement here, however, is the total picture of the Pharisees that emerges from the New Testament record. Their devious handling of money by application of the device of "Corban," which Jesus so emphatically condemned, their making the temple itself a "den of thieves and robbers," and their merciless exploitation of the poor, and their having more regard for an animal than for a human being - all of these things demonstrate the indisputable fact that Luke's simple declaration here, to the effect that this class were "lovers of money," is in perfect harmony with all the word of God. As Frank L. Cox said, "No one scoffs at a scriptural lesson on giving but the lover of money."[26]

Scoffed at him ... "The term scoffed indicates to turn up the nose at a thing."[27]

[25] Ray Summers, op. cit., p. 192.

[26] Frank L. Cox, According to Luke (Austin, Texas: Firm Foundation Publishing House, 1941), p. 50.

[27] Anthony Lee Ash, Living Word Commentary (Austin, Texas: Sweet Publishing Company, 1973), Vol. 4, p. 73.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the Pharisees also who were covetous,.... Or lovers of money, the love of which is the root of all evil; and that they were, is evident from their devouring widows' houses, under a pretence of making long prayers for them, Matthew 23:14

heard all these things; as well as the disciples, being in company with them, Luke 15:2 even the parable concerning the unjust steward, and the application of it; and the directions given about using the things of this world, and the distributing of them to the poor, and showing a greater concern for riches of an higher nature:

and they derided him: lift up their nose, or drew it out to him, as the word signifies, in a sneering way; they rejected and despised what he said about their injustice, in their stewardship; the calling of them to an account for it, and the turning of them out of it; and concerning the true use of worldly riches, and the contempt of them; they looked upon themselves safe and secure in the good opinion of the people, and happy in the enjoyment of worldly things; and looked upon him as a weak man, to talk in the manner he did.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-16.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Who were lovers of money (πιλαργυροι υπαρχοντεςphilarguroi huparchontes). Literally, being lovers of money. ΠιλαργυροιPhilarguroi is an old word, but in the N.T. only here and 2 Timothy 3:2. It is from πιλοςphilos and αργυροςarguros (ηκουονēkouon). Imperfect active, were listening (all the while Jesus was talking to the disciples (Luke 16:1-13).

And they scoffed at him (και εχεμυκτηριζονkai exemuktērizon). Imperfect active again of εκμυκτηριζωekmuktērizō lxx where late writers use simple verb. In the N.T. only here and Luke 23:35. It means to turn out or up the nose at one, to sneer, to scoff. The Romans had a phrase, naso adunco suspendere, to hang on the hooked nose (the subject of ridicule). These money-loving Pharisees were quick to see that the words of Jesus about the wise use of money applied to them. They had stood without comment the three parables aimed directly at them (the lost sheep, the lost coin, the lost son). But now they do not remain quiet while they hear the fourth parable spoken to the disciples. No words were apparently spoken, but their eyes, noses, faces were eloquent with a fine disdain.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-16.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Covetous ( φιλάργυροι )

Rev. renders literally, according to the composition of the word, lover, of money. Only here and 2 Timothy 3:2. Compare the kindred noun, 1 Timothy 6:10. The usual word for covetous is πλεονέκτης (1 Corinthians 5:10, 1 Corinthians 5:11; 1 Corinthians 6:10).

Derided ( ἐξεμυκτήριζον )

Only here and Luke 23:35. Lit., to turn up the nose at. The Romans had a corresponding phrase, naso adunco suspendere,to hang on the hooked nose: i.e., to turn up the nose and make a hook of it, on which (figuratively) to hang the subject of ridicule. Thus Horace, in one of his satires, giving an account of a pretentious banquet at the house of a rich miser, describes one of the guests as hanging everything to his nose; i.e., making a joke of everything that occurred. The simple verb occurs at Galatians 6:7, of mocking God.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-16.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

And the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things1; and they scoffed at him.

  1. And the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things;
  2. and they scoffed at him. The Pharisees derided him with open insolence (Luke 23:35). This was a new phase of their opposition, and showed that they no longer feared Jesus as formerly, being assured that he aimed at no earthly dominion. Because of his poverty they may have regarded him as prejudiced against wealth. At any rate, they regarded themselves as living contradictions of this to them ridiculous statement that a man could not be rich and yet religious.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-16.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

14 And the Pharisees also, who were covetous, heard all these things: and they derided him.

Ver. 14. And they derided him] Gr. εξεμυκτηριζον, they blew their noses at him in scorn and derision. They fleered and jeered, when they should have feared, and fled from the wrath to come. Naso suspendere adunco. Horat.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-16.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 16:14

Consider the conduct of the Pharisees, whose weak point had been touched by our Lord's teaching; they adopted the fool's course of mocking at that which they could not deny to be true, but whose truth they did not like to follow into its consequences, namely, into the practical result of a godly, self-denying life. Concerning this mode of dealing with rebuke, I have two remarks to make.

I. In the first place, I remark that however foolish a mode it may seem, and however much people may feel ashamed of it, when they see what it really is, yet it is very common and, in the usual sense of the word, very natural. It is natural to turn into ridicule any exhortation or rebuke which has been felt to touch ourselves, and because it is natural, therefore it is also common. In the Book of Proverbs a fearful light is thrown upon the subject of mockery when wisdom is represented as eventually adopting the same course herself, mocking those who had once mocked her, laughing at their trouble, showing in such an awful manner the folly of such conduct by a terrific kind of retaliation.

II. The second remark which I have to make is that this method of derision is not only foolish and empty, but is also positively mischievous. The Pharisees in the text, for example, were morally injured by their conduct towards the Lord; they were less fit than they were before to receive impressions for good; their covetousness was fixed more firmly, and all their other evil habits also. For this is the special characteristic of deriding what is good, that the whole moral sense suffers, the edge of the conscience is blunted; the man is less open to conviction than before, not only with regard to the particular subject which called forth his derision, but with regard to every subject. Indeed the surest method which Satan can adopt, to ruin in the end a Christian's character, is to tempt him in the beginning to deride the persons from whom he hears solemn instruction and warning, or the books in which he reads the same.

Bishop Harvey Goodwin, Parish Sermons, 5th series, p. 233.


References: Luke 16:14.—J. P. Gledstone, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxii., p. 181. Luke 16:15.—C. G. Finney, Sermons on Gospel Themes, p. 347.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-16.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 16:14. And they derided him. The original word is very emphatical; εξεμυκτηριζον : "They mocked him by a scornful motion of the mouth and nose,"—as well as by what they spake to him. The word might be rendered they sneered. There was a gravity and dignity in our Lord's discourse, which, insolent as they were, would not permit them to laugh out; but by some scornful air they hinted to each other their mutual contempt.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-16.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

The Pharisees were notoriously addicted to the sin of covetousness, accounting no man happy but them that were rich: and because the promises made to the Jews were generally, (though not only) of temporal blessings, they looked upon poverty as a curse, and esteemed the poor accursed, John 7:49 The Pharisees hearing their covetousness reproved, and the doctrine of charity and alms preached and enforced by our Saviour, they derided him in the shamefulest manner, with the highest degree of contempt and scorn, wringing the nose, and making mouths at him, as the original word seems to import.

Learn hence,

1. That sinners grow very angry and impatient under the ministry of the word, when they hear their darling sin, their beloved lust, struck at, and sharply reproved.

2. That covetous men who make wealth their idol, when they hear the doctrine of an holy comtempt for the world preached, and the great duty of alms giving urged and enforced, they make it the matter of their contempt and derision: The Pharisees heard and derided him.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-16.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 16:14. καὶ οἱ φαρισαῖοι, the Pharisees also) His words were addressed to the disciples in the hearing of the Pharisees.— φιλάργυροι, covetous) A class of persons who are the most ready of all to take offence.— ἐξεμυκτήριζον, they began to deride Him) who was the teacher of singleness of heart. [Whereas they fancied themselves to be accomplished in (furnished with) such prudence as to be able admirably to combine the service of God and that of mammon.—V. g.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-16.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Concerning the Pharisees’ covetousness we have often heard before; and indeed they were so from this principle, that none but the rich were happy and blessed, and that all poor people were cursed, John 7:49; in opposition to whom some think that our Saviour, Luke 6:20, blessed the poor. The promises relating to the Old Testament, and made to the Jews, were generally of temporal blessings, though under them spiritual mercies were also understood. As hypocrites can never endure to have their beloved lusts touched, and persons that have drank in an error have no patience to hear it contradicted; so the Pharisees had no patience to hear that doctrine, which crossed what they had taught, and struck at their darling lusts.

They derided him: the word used signifieth a deriding with the highest degree of scorn and contempt.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 16:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-16.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Derided him; because of the doctrine contained in the preceding discourse, in which he taught that all our wealth belongs to God, and that to obtain heaven, we must faithfully use it in his service, and that too with undivided love and devotion.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-16.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And the Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things; and they scoffed at him.’

The Pharisees scoffed at His ideas (literally ‘turned up their noses at Him’). When Luke says that it was because they were ‘lovers of money’ he does not necessarily mean that they were greedy, although no doubt some of them were. He means more that their view of money was very different from that of Jesus. They honoured and revered it. It was true that they did consider that wealth was one test of a man’s righteousness, but for the opposite reason to Jesus. In their case it was because they saw its possession in abundance as being a measure of God’s approval. Taking the opposite view to Jesus they saw prosperity as the reward for godliness. They thus gave possession of it a high place in their thinking, not recognising the harm that it did men. They would certainly have approved of charitable giving, but what they did not approve of was Jesus’ idea that money should be held on to lightly and not seen as good for its own sake. That was why they mocked. Jesus’ view went against all that men believed.

They would certainly have theoretically agreed that God was more important than money, but they fell into the trap of not recognising (as most people fail to recognise) that they actually allowed it to influence them more than they allowed God to do. They were not true ‘lovers of God’, they were ‘lovers of money’. In their practical lives they actually loved Mammon more than they loved God. They exemplified all the wrong aspects of Luke 16:13.

That this is true comes out in their history. Alexander Jannaeus in the previous century had warned his wife against the greediness and wickedness of men who ‘pretended to be Pharisees’ (i.e. were hypocritical Pharisees), and there is other evidence that proves that they were on occasions open to accepting bribes. While Jesus Himself spoke of the Scribes as ‘devouring widow’s houses’ (Luke 20:47), which probably refers to a tendency to sponge on them. So their reputation from this angle was certainly not blameless.

Jesus’ point is that what we love is demonstrated by how we behave. Those who truly love God hold lightly to the things of this world. But the very theology of the Pharisees made them take up the opposite viewpoint and see possession of wealth as highly desirable. And the result was that it then became loved for its own sake. They became lovers of Mammon even while they thought that they were lovers of God (see Luke 16:13).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-16.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Renewed topic of controversy with the PhariseesThe doctrine concerning riches, Luke 16:14-31.

14.The Pharisees (probably the same Herodian set as in Luke 13:31-33, and Luke 15:1-2, where see our notes) raised a dispute because Jesus received and ate with converted publicans and sinners. Their murmurs then drew out the THREE PARABLES in regard to mercy for the penitent. Their present assault in consequence of the two last parables, and the doctrine of Christ in regard to riches, called forth the parable of the rich man. Were covetous—Literally, in the Greek they were , or silver-loving. That is, they were greedy for wealth and pomp.

Heard—The Greek imperfect tense signifies were hearing. They were listening while our Lord delivered the last parable, greatly disgusted with his treatment of the subject of riches. Derided—Greek, were deriding him; they were doing so while he spoke. The word in the original signifies that sort of propelling the breath through the nostrils expressed by the word to snuffle, and more delicately by the word to sneer. Of course they sneered with bitter words also. We might imagine them saying, “No doubt that treacherous steward is the proper model for his set of villainous publicans; the stewards of the Roman oppressors of Israel.” But they themselves were the courtiers of Herod Antipas, who was by blood an Edomite.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-16.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 16:14. And the Pharisees also. The preceding parable was addressed to the disciples (Luke 16:1), but the Pharisees heard all these things. A continued act is meant, here and in what follows: and they scoffed at him. Their feeling was: This man makes riches of little account, but we know better; we can keep our wealth and our piety too. Hence the next verse is aimed at their semblance of piety, which was the basis of their derision of Him.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-16.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 16:14. · an interesting and very credible bit of information concerning the Pharisees (2 Timothy 3:2).— ( and , the nose), turned up the nose at, in contempt, again in Luke 23:35.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-16.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Now the Pharisees, &c. Christ had admonished the Scribes and Pharisees not to presume too much on their own sanctity, but to receive repenting sinners, and to redeem their own sins with alms. But they derided these precepts of mercy and humility; either because they esteemed what he commanded them to be useless, or because they thought they had already complied with them. (Ven. Bede) --- The Pharisees considered temporal riches as true goods, and the recompense which God had promised to such as observed his laws; they therefore laughed at the doctrine of Jesus Christ, which extolled liberality and alms-deeds, and despised the Master who, on all occasions, testified his great regard for poverty in his discourses, in his conduct, in the choice of his apostles, who were all poor, and had no pretensions whatever to exterior pomp or show. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-16.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the Pharisees. See App-120.

were = being then. Greek. huparcho, as in Luke 16:23, and see on Luke 7:25.

covetous = money-lovers (referring to mammon, verses: 11, 13); Occurs only here, and 2 Timothy 3:2.

derided = were turning up their noses at. Occurs only here and Luke 23:35. Found in the LXX. Pas. Luke 2:4; Luke 22:7; Luke 22:35. is. This was the immediate cause of the second Parable (verses: Luke 16:19-30), and the solemn application (Luke 16:31).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the Pharisees also, who were covetous, heard all these things: and they derided him.

And the Pharisees also, who were covetous, heard all these things: and they derided him.

[ exeemukteerizon (Greek #1592)] - sneered at Him; their master, sin, being too plainly struck at. But it was easier to ridicule than to refute such teaching.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-16.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

14. And they made fun of Jesus. They understood Jesus to be attacking greed, and they thought this foolish, because they measured everything in terms of money.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-16.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) And the Pharisees also, who were covetous.—The words are important as showing that they had been listening during the previous parable, and that the words, though addressed to the disciples, had been meant also for them. (See Note on Luke 16:1.) The word for “covetous” is literally lovers of money, as distinct from more general cupidity, and as being used by St. Paul in 2 Timothy 3:2, and nowhere else in the New Testament, furnishes another instance of community of language between him and the Evangelist.

Derided him.—The verb implies visible rather than audible signs of scorn—the distended nostril, and the sneering lip, the naso suspendere adunco of the Roman satirist. It is, i.e., a word that forcibly expresses the physiognomy of contempt (see Galatians 6:7). Here again we have a word common to the two writers just named. The motive of the derision lies on the surface. That they, the teachers of Israel, should be told that they were like the Unjust Steward, that they were wasting their Lord’s goods, that they must make friends with the unrighteous mammon of quite another kind than those whom they were wont to court—this was more than they could stand. They have felt the force of the rebuke, and therefore they stifle it with mockery—

“A little grain of conscience made them sour.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-16.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the Pharisees also, who were covetous, heard all these things: and they derided him.
who
12:15; 20:47; Isaiah 56:11; Jeremiah 6:13; 8:10; Ezekiel 22:25-29; 33:31; Matthew 23:14
derided
8:53; 23:35; Psalms 35:15,16; 119:51; Isaiah 53:3; Jeremiah 20:7,8; Hebrews 11:36; Hebrews 12:2,3
Reciprocal: Exodus 20:17 - thy neighbour's house;  Leviticus 11:29 - creeping things that creep;  2 Chronicles 30:10 - they laughed;  2 Chronicles 36:16 - despised;  Job 12:4 - the just;  Psalm 10:3 - whom;  Psalm 22:7 - laugh;  Psalm 36:2 - For he;  Psalm 107:11 - contemned;  Psalm 119:36 - and not to;  Psalm 123:3 - for we are;  Proverbs 11:12 - that;  Proverbs 14:2 - but;  Proverbs 23:9 - he;  Proverbs 28:11 - rich;  Isaiah 29:20 - the scorner;  Jeremiah 22:17 - covetousness;  Matthew 3:7 - the Pharisees;  Matthew 5:20 - exceed;  Matthew 19:23 - That;  Mark 5:40 - they;  Mark 10:2 - the Pharisees;  Mark 10:24 - trust;  Luke 2:35 - that;  Luke 6:25 - laugh;  John 1:24 - were of;  John 3:19 - because;  Acts 13:41 - ye despisers;  Ephesians 5:3 - covetousness;  2 Timothy 3:3 - despisers;  Hebrews 13:5 - conversation

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-16.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

14.And the Pharisees, who were covetous, heard all these things. They who imagine that Christ was ridiculed by the Pharisees, because he chose to employ a plain and familiar style, and made no use of swelling words, (302) do not sufficiently comprehend what Luke means. Haughty and disdainful men, I do acknowledge, view the doctrine of the Gospel with contempt; but Luke expressly declares the reason why Christ was the object of their derision to have been, that they were covetous Entertaining a firm and deep-seated conviction that the rich are happy, and that there is nothing better for men than to increase their wealth by every possible method, and earnestly to guard whatever they have acquired, they reject as foolish paradoxes (303) all the sayings of Christ which had a contrary tendency. And, certainly, any one that speaks of despising riches, or bestowing alms on the poor, is regarded by the covetous as a madman. Horace’s words on this subject are well known: (304) “The people hiss at me, but I am well satisfied with myself.” (305) But if, even when they are condemned by universal opinion, they continue to flatter themselves, how much more will they ridicule as a fable that philosophy of Christ which is far removed from the ordinary belief?

Some other pretense, I have no doubt, was held out by the Pharisees for ridiculing and evading a doctrine which opposed their vice. But we must attend to the motive by which they were actuated; for it is a disease which almost always prevails in the world, that the greater part of men affect to despise whatever does not fall in with their corrupt morals. Hence the ridicule, and jest, and merriment, with which the word of God is frequently assailed; for every man fights in defense of his own vices, and all imagine that their witticisms will serve for a cloud to screen their criminality.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:14". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-16.html. 1840-57.