Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 16:15

And He said to them, "You are those who justify yourselves in the sight of men, but God knows your hearts; for that which is highly esteemed among men is detestable in the sight of God.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - God Continued...;   Heart;   Hypocrisy;   Self-Righteousness;   Sin;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Abominations;   Error;   Heart;   Hearts Read;   Knowledge;   Knowledge, Divine;   Knowledge-Ignorance;   Self-Justification-Self-Condemnation;   Self-Righteousness;   Sin;   Sin-Saviour;   Transgression;   The Topic Concordance - Abomination;   Covetousness;   Hate;   Heart;   Justification;   Knowledge;   Man;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Pharisees, the;   Self-Righteousness;   Wisdom of God, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Justification;   Parables;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Heart;   Know, Knowledge;   Motives;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Lazarus;   Parable;   Pharisees;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Abomination, Abomination of Desolation;   Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ethics;   Heart;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abomination ;   Covetousness;   Discourse;   Foresight;   Gospels (2);   Heart;   Justifying One's Self;   Lazarus;   Mary;   Mental Characteristics;   Quotations (2);   Reality;   Steward, Stewardship;   Violence;   Winter ;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Bible, the;   Esteem;   Exalt;   Foreknow;   Grace;   Omniscience;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for September 8;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Ye - justify yourselves - Ye declare yourselves to be just. Ye endeavor to make it appear to men that ye can still feel an insatiable thirst after the present world, and yet secure the blessings of another; that ye can reconcile God and mammon, - and serve two masters with equal zeal and affection; but God knoweth your hearts, - and he knoweth that ye are alive to the world, and dead to God and goodness. Therefore, howsoever ye may be esteemed among men, ye are an abomination before him. See the note on Luke 7:29.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-16.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he said unto them, Ye are they that justify yourselves in the sight of men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God.

The men Jesus addressed here "tended to connect earthly prosperity and goodness. Wealth was a sign that a man was a good man."[28] However, mere material prosperity, unsanctified by spiritual motivation and consciousness of stewardship under God, is here called an abomination in the sight of God.

ENDNOTE:

[28] William Barclay, op. cit., p. 218.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he said unto them,.... That is, Jesus said unto them, as the Syriac and Persic versions express it: "ye are they which justify yourselves before men": from the sins of injustice, unfaithfulness, covetousness, and all others; and would be thought, and appear to be righteous; but it is only in the sight of men, who can only see the outside of things, and judge thereby:

but God knoweth your hearts; and what is in them, the deceitfulness, hypocrisy, covetousness, and cruelty of them, which are hid from the eyes of men:

for that which is highly esteemed among men; or what is high in the account and esteem of men, as the outward appearance of these men for morality, religion, and holiness; their zeal for the ceremonies of the law, and the traditions of the elders:

is abomination in the sight of God; who knew full well from what principles, and with what views they acted, to gain popular applause, and amass riches to themselves, without any concern for the glory of God, and the good of men: see Isaiah 65:5.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-16.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

4 And he said unto them, Ye are they which justify yourselves before men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.

(4) Our sins are not hidden to God, although they may be hidden to men, yea although they may be hidden to those who committed them.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-16.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

justify yourselves — make a show of righteousness.

highly esteemed among men — generally carried away by plausible appearances. (See 1 Samuel 16:7; and Luke 14:11).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-16.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

That justify yourselves (οι δικαιουντες εαυτουςhoi dikaiountes heautous). They were past-masters at that and were doing it now by upturned noses.

An abomination in the sight of God (βδελυγμα ενωπιον του τεουbdelugma enōpion tou theou). See note on Matthew 24:15 and note on Mark 13:14 for this lxx word for a detestable thing as when Antiochus Epiphanes set up an altar to Zeus in place of that to Jehovah. There is withering scorn in the use of this phrase by Jesus to these pious pretenders.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-16.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Abomination

See on Matthew 24:15.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-16.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he said unto them, Ye are they which justify yourselves before men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.

And he said to them, Ye are they who justify yourselves before men — The sense of the whole passage is, that pride, wherewith you justify yourselves, feeds covetousness, derides the Gospel, Luke 16:14, and destroys the law, Luke 16:18. All which is illustrated by a terrible example.

Ye justify yourselves before men — Ye think yourselves righteous, and persuade others to think you so.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-16.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he said unto them, Ye are they that justify yourselves in the sight of men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God1.

  1. For that which is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God. The Pharisees lived in such outward contrast to the publicans and made such pretensions and claims that men esteemed them righteous, but they were nonetheless abominable in God's sight. God approves righteousness when "inward", but despises the mere outward show of it.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-16.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Is abomination; that is, is often abomination.

Luke 16:16-18. The connection between these remarks and those which precede is not obvious. Matthew records them as having been spoken on different occasions, (Matthew 11:12; Matthew 5:18,19:9.) where their meaning and connection are obvious.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-16.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

15 And he said unto them, Ye are they which justify yourselves before men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.

Ver. 15. For that which is highly esteemed, &c.] A thing that I see in the night may shine, and that shining proceed from nothing but rottenness. There may be malum opus in bona materia, as in Jehu’s zeal. Two things make a good Christian, good actions and good aims. And though a good aim doth not make a bad action good (as in Uzzah), yet a bad aim makes a good action bad (as in Jehu, Hosea 1:4, whose justice was approved, but his policy punished).

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-16.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here our Saviour sharply reproves the Pharisees for their horrible pride, their self-justification, and vain affectation of the opinion and esteem of others; as if Christ had said, "You bear up yourselves, and take a pride in this, that men know no ill by you, that no man can say, 'Black is your eye;' but God can see that black is your heart. You think that because you glory in your own excellences, God glories in you too; but whoever is highly esteemed by you, is abominated by God."

Learn, that no man ought to think himself approved of God barely because he is approved by himself; for all who justify themselves upon the goodness of their works are not good.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-16.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

15.] See last note, end.

δικαιοῦντες ἐνώπ. τ. ἀνθρ., a contrast to ἥμαρτον ἐνώπιόν σου, ch. Luke 15:18 : and βδέλυγ. ἐνώπιον τ. θεοῦ to χαρὰ ἐνώπιον τ. ἀγγ. τοῦ θεοῦ, ch. Luke 15:10.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-16.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 16:15. οἱ δικαιοῦντεςἀνθρώπων) Ye do some things that are just, and thence ye suppose yourselves to be just, ye feign that ye are so, and are regarded as such. The antithesis is γινώσκει, knoweth.— καρδίας, hearts) The heart is the seat of justice and of injustice. [This axiom is most powerfully effectual both in convicting the bad and confirming the sincere.—V. g.]— τὸ ἐν ἀνθρώποις ὑψηλὸν, that which is lofty [highly-esteemed] among men) What seems to men among their fellow-men the very height of justice (righteousness). Comp. ch. Luke 18:14 [ πᾶς ὑψῶν ἑαυτὸν], “every one that exalteth himself.” This is the connection of the subsequent words, Justification of one’s self before men, and loftiness of heart, nourish covetousness, and deride heavenly simplicity and singleness of heart, Luke 16:15, and despise the Gospel [“the Kingdom of God is preached,” ἐυαγγελίζεται], Luke 16:16, and disregard the law, Luke 16:17, a fact (their disregard of the law) which is shown by an instance of the violation of the law most necessary to be spoken to the Pharisees [who were given to adultery], Luke 16:18. The narrative concerning the rich man and Lazarus comprises all these points.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-16.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

By justifying here is to be understood either an appearing before men as just, and strict observers of the law, or a predicating of themselves as just: You (saith our Saviour) make a fine show, and great brags amongst men; but God’s eye goeth deeper, he knoweth the heart, what pride, and covetousness, and hypocrisy lodge there. Men do not know your hearts, but God knoweth them. All is not gold by God’s touchstone that glitters in man’s eyes. Nay, many things which are highly esteemed amongst men, as matters of great devotion and piety and merit, and which they applaud others for, are in the sight of God no better than abominations. This highly obliges all not to make their estimate of things, from the value and estimate which men put upon them; not every thing, but many things which are highly esteemed amongst men are abomination in the sight of God.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 16:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-16.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

выказываете себя праведниками Фарисеи были убеждены, что их собственная добродетель оправдывала их (ср. Рим. 10:3). Это – подлинное определение «самоправедности». Но, как говорил Иисус, их праведность была порочна, будучи всего лишь внешней маской. Этого могло быть достаточно, чтобы оправдать их перед людьми, но не перед Богом, потому что Он знал их сердца и неоднократно обнажал их склонность искать похвалы людей (ср. Мф. 6:2, 5, 16; 23:28).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-16.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Justify yourselves; you pretend before men to be just and good, and are by them highly esteemed; but God, who sees your hearts, abhors and condemns your hypocrisy and worldliness.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-16.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And he said to them, “You are they who justify yourselves in the sight of men, but God knows your hearts, for that which is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God.”

Jesus recognises that their derision goes to the very heart of what is wrong with them. They have built up a theology to which they can point to demonstrate the ‘rightness’ of their behaviour, much of which is actually an abomination to God, for it makes idols of their ‘laws’ which in fact themselves fail to make them righteous. He wants them to recognise that God does not smile on their posturing, it makes Him sick. All their emphases are in the wrong place.

It is true they can thus justify themselves in men’s eyes. Indeed men, who have similar wrong ideas, actually admire them for it. They parade their asceticism (Matthew 6:16), they parade their phylacteries (Matthew 23:5), they parade their almsgiving (Matthew 6:2), they parade their praying (Matthew 6:5), they parade their excessive ‘cleanness’ (Matthew 23:25; Mark 7:3-5), they tithe more than is necessary so as to make a good impression (Matthew 23:23-24), they make a great fuss about the Sabbath (while at the same time providing ways of avoiding the strictness that they profess), and it makes them proud, and arrogant. And people think they are wonderful and exalt them (compare Luke 14:11; Romans 11:20; Romans 12:16) because it is far more than they do themselves, and accords with man’s false view of God as someone to be manipulated by such methods.

Yet they are at the same time cold, and heartless, and supercritical and lacking in compassion when dealing with people. They are missing out on ‘the weightier matters of the Law’, justice, faith and mercy (Matthew 23:23). Their whole way of life is thus an abomination in the sight of God because of their pride (compare Proverbs 16:5), their religious posturing (Isaiah 1:13), and their unjust dealings (Proverbs 11:1). This is because it all stems from the wrong motives, from the idea of bargaining with God to obtain His favour (if we obey the covenant you will give us eternal life and establish Israel), the desire to be approved of and admired by men, and an over-readiness to criticise anyone who fails to agree with and fit into their ideas. Men may esteem such ideas, but God abhors them. For while the first statement, that a satisfying life comes about through keeping the Law, is, if correctly stated, theoretically in accordance with Scripture (Leviticus 18:5), none of them can achieve it because they have already sinned, and sin constantly. Thus if it is seen as a bargaining counter they are seeking to achieve the impossible.

But what the Scripture was promising (Leviticus 18:5) was not some arduous way into Heaven, it was that by living in accordance with His Law they would enjoy a full life in fellowship with God. So God was not there speaking of achieving eternal life through it. That could only be through God’s gift (Romans 6:23). That could only be obtained through God’s mercy alone. Thus in doing what they were doing, they were striving to fulfil a goal that they had laid out for themselves, and were missing what was most important, the fact that the new age with its Good News was here, so that eternal life was being offered through faith in Him. Furthermore they had also by their methods distorted the written and infallible Law of God, which they had transformed into something unrecognisable.

‘That which is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God.’ We have seen above some of the things that men exalt in, but which God hates, but there are two actually mentioned in the passage. The first is their love of wealth. Most men agree with them and exalt in it, but how much God abominates it comes out in the parable that follows. For it stands between men and true goodness. In the parable Abraham, (surely an authority whom the Pharisees will recognise), is pictured as informing the rich man that ‘remember that you in your lifetime received your good things ---but now --- you are in anguish’. Here then is a warning of the danger of riches. Those who bask in good things now are in danger for the future unless they ensure that others more needy can bask in the good things too. But the second will be mentioned rather unexpectedly in Luke 16:18, for we must ask why does He in context bring up the question of divorce? We have already seen that the verse parallels Luke 16:14 in the chiasmus, which suggests that it speaks of something else which the Pharisees love. This suggests that while they were too chaste to engage in open adultery or involvement with prostitutes, they did not mind, or object to, indulging in adultery through marriage with divorced persons. (Perhaps some recent case was especially in Jesus’ mind). That too was esteemed among men, but was abomination in the sight of God.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-16.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.Ye—The countenancers of royal adultery.

Justify yourselves before men—Make an imposing display of maintaining your own purity and righteousness before the government and nation.

Your hearts—God knows that you are unrighteous from your covetousness for wealth and power.

Highly esteemed—In the original lofty or very high. Alluding to the lofty haughtiness of these sneering favourers of royal vice.

Abomination’ God—Whose law you are surrendering to your own self-interest.

In the three following verses our Lord shows that the law continued until the coming of John; and the Gospel still maintains the law, and both condemn adultery.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-16.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 16:15. Ye are they that justify yourselves, declare yourselves to be righteous in the sight of men; but God knoweth your hearts. Plainly implying that in His sight they were not justified, accounted as righteous. For that which is lofty among men, i.e., considered so by men.

Is abomination in the sight of God. Because He knows the heart, He judges differently from men, and precisely what men regard most highly He regards least. This general truth applies to the special case of the Pharisees.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-16.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 16:15. . .: cf. the statements in Sermon on Mount (Matthew 6) and in Matthew 23:5.— , etc.: a strong statement, but broadly true; conventional moral judgments are very often the reverse of the real truth: the conventionally high, estimable, really the low; the conventionally base the truly noble.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-16.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Who justify yourselves, &c. But our Lord, detecting their hidden malice, shews that their pretended justice is all hypocrisy. (Theophylactus) --- But God knoweth, &c. They justify themselves before men, whom they look upon as despicable, and abandoned sinners, and esteem themselves as not standing in need of giving alms as a remedy of sin; but he who shall lay open the secrets of hearts, sees the base atrocity of that pride which thus blinds them, and swells within their breasts. (Ven. Bede) --- Yes, all those exterior actions which appeared great, and which were admired by men, being vitiated with improper motives and sinister designs, are an abomination in the sight of God. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-16.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

unto them. Addressed to the Pharisees. See the Structure "R" and "R", p. 1479.

justify yourselves. See notes on Luke 15:7, Luke 15:29; and Compare Luke 7:39. Matthew 23:25.

among. Greek. en. App-104. abomination. In contrast with their derision.

in the sight of. Same word as "before" in preceding clause.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he said unto them, Ye are they which justify yourselves before men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.

And he said unto them, Ye are they which justify yourselves (make a show of righteousness) before men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is highly esteemed among men - who are easily carried away by plausible appearances (see 1 Samuel 16:7; and Luke 14:11),

Is abomination in the sight of God - who, Himself true, loathes all hypocrisy.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-16.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

15. Is worth nothing in God’s sight. The things that seem so important in this world, have no value in God’s sight. Compare 1 Corinthians 1:26-31.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-16.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) Ye are they which justify yourselves before men.—The character described is portrayed afterwards more fully in the parable of Luke 18:9-14. The word there used, “this man went down to his house justified rather than the other,” is obviously a reference to what is reported here. They forgot, in their self-righteousness and self-vindication, that they stood before God as the Searcher of all hearts.

That which is highly esteemed among men . . .—Literally, that which is high, or lifted up, among men. The word is at once wider and more vivid than the English.

Abomination . . .—The word is the same as in “the abomination of desolation” (Matthew 24:15), that which causes physically nausea and loathing. The word seems chosen as the expression of a divine scorn and indignation, which answered, in part, to their “derision,” and was its natural result. (Comp. the bold language of Psalms 2:4, Proverbs 1:26, Revelation 3:16.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-16.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he said unto them, Ye are they which justify yourselves before men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.
Ye
10:29; 11:39; 18:11,21; 20:20,47; Proverbs 20:6; Matthew 6:2,5,16; 23:5,25-27; Romans 3:20; James 2:21-25
God
1 Samuel 16:7; 1 Chronicles 29:17; 2 Chronicles 6:30; Psalms 7:9; 139:1,2; Jeremiah 17:10; John 2:25; John 21:17; Acts 1:18; 15:8; 1 Corinthians 4:5; Revelation 2:23
for
Psalms 10:3; 49:13,18; Proverbs 16:5; Isaiah 1:10-14; Amos 5:21,22; Malachi 3:15; 1 Peter 3:4; 5:5
Reciprocal: Genesis 18:21 - I will know;  Leviticus 7:18 - an abomination;  Job 9:20 - justify;  Job 10:4 - seest thou;  Psalm 32:5 - have;  Psalm 36:2 - For he;  Psalm 119:51 - proud;  Proverbs 3:32 - the froward;  Proverbs 16:2 - but;  Proverbs 21:2 - the Lord;  Proverbs 30:12 - that are;  Isaiah 5:20 - them;  Isaiah 43:26 - declare;  Hosea 12:8 - they;  Matthew 5:20 - exceed;  Matthew 18:35 - from;  Matthew 23:28 - ye also;  Mark 2:17 - They that are whole;  Mark 7:21 - out;  Luke 1:6 - righteous;  Luke 2:35 - that;  Luke 6:25 - laugh;  Luke 15:7 - which;  Luke 18:9 - which;  Luke 18:14 - justified;  John 5:42 - I know;  John 12:43 - they;  Romans 10:3 - to establish;  2 Corinthians 10:7 - ye look;  2 Corinthians 10:18 - not;  Galatians 6:12 - as desire;  Philippians 4:8 - think

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-16.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

15.It is you that justify yourselves before men. We see that Christ does not give way to their disdainful conduct, but constantly maintains the authority of his doctrine in opposition to their mockery; and it is the duty of all the ministers of the Gospel to pursue the same course, by meeting ungodly despisers with the dreadful judgment of God. He declares that the hypocrisy, with which they deceive the eyes of men, will be of no avail to them at the judgment-seat of God. They were unwilling to have it thought that their mockery was intended as a defense of their covetousness. But Christ affirms that this venom breaks out from a concealed ulcer; just as if one were to tell the mitred prelates of our own day, that their hostility to the Gospel arises from the severity with which it attacks their hidden vices.

But God knoweth your hearts. He says that they reckon it enough if they appear to be good in the eyes of men, and if they can boast of a pretended sanctity; but that God, who knoweth the hearts, is well acquainted with the vices which they conceal from the view of the world. And here we must attend to the distinction between the judgments of God and the judgments of men; for men bestow approbation on outward appearances, but at the judgment-seat of God nothing is approved but an upright heart. There is added a striking observation:

What is highly esteemed by men is abomination in the sight of God. Not that God rejects those virtues, the approbation of which He hath engraved on the hearts of men; but that God detests whatever men are disposed, of their own accord, to applaud. Hence it is evident in what light we ought to view all pretended acts of worship which the world contrives according to its own fancy. How much soever they may please their inventors, Christ pronounces that they are not only vain and worthless, but are even detestable.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:15". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-16.html. 1840-57.