Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 16:16

"The Law and the Prophets were proclaimed until John; since that time the gospel of the kingdom of God has been preached, and everyone is forcing his way into it.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Gospel;   Law;   Seekers;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Kingdom;   Kingdom, Spiritual;   Spiritual;   The Topic Concordance - Evangelism;   Failure;   Kingdom of God;   Law;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - John the baptist;   Kingdom of god;   Parables;   Scriptures;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Evangelize, Evangelism;   Gospel;   John the Baptist;   Kingdom of God;   Touch;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Law, Ten Commandments, Torah;   Luke, Gospel of;   Violence;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Law;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Asceticism (2);   Discourse;   Fulfilment;   Gospel (2);   Gospels (2);   Israel, Israelite;   John the Baptist;   Kingdom of God (or Heaven);   Mammon;   Metaphors;   Monotheism;   Regeneration (2);   Scripture (2);   Steward, Stewardship;   Time (2);   Violence;   Winter ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Age,;   Dispensation,;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Husks;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Bible, the;   Canon of the Old Testament;   Violence;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Bible Canon;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The law and the prophets were until John - The law and the prophets continued to be the sole teachers till John came, who first began to proclaim the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and now, he who wishes to be made a partaker of the blessings of that kingdom must rush speedily into it; as there will be but a short time before an utter destruction shall fall upon this ungodly race. They who wish to be saved must imitate those who take a city by storm - rush into it, without delay, as the Romans are about to do into Jerusalem. See also on Matthew 11:12; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-16.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

See the notes at Matthew 11:12-14.

Every man - Many people, or multitudes. This is an expression that is very common, as when we say everybody is engaged in a piece of business, meaning that it occupies general attention.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-16.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

The law and the prophets were until John: from that time the gospel of the kingdom of God is preached; and every man entereth violently into it.

It is a mistake to view Matthew 11:12,13 as a parallel with this.

Why could not Jesus on two occasions or still more have made statements about John as a transitional person and about the violent pressing into the kingdom?[29]

Whatever is meant by "violently," this must be viewed as improper and reprehensible on the part of those thus seeking to enter the kingdom. Some of the Ante-Nicene writers viewed the "violence" here in a favorable fashion as indicating the zeal with which men should seek to enter the kingdom; but the scholarly J. W. McGarvey, it appears, has a far better understanding of this admittedly difficult passage. He said:

The gates of Christ's kingdom were not opened until Pentecost (Acts 2); but men, hearing it was about to be opened, sought to enter it prematurely, not by the gates which God would open, but by such breaches as they themselves sought to make in its walls.[30]

The type of violence with which men sought to force the kingdom is illustrated by the multitude's action in trying to make him king by force; and the Pharisees, particularly, thought the kingdom would be a secular restoration of the old Solomonic throne; and they were at that very moment trying to force Jesus to conform to their secular and materialistic views of the kingdom, all of which is indicated by their scoffing at him. (See more elaborate discussion of this in my Commentary on Matthew, Matthew 11:12)

Geldenhuys also concurred in the view of McGarvey that the kingdom was not established. He said:

Although the kingdom has not yet come in final completeness, it nevertheless came into the world as a mighty actuality, already in and with Jesus' public appearances on earth.[31]

[29] Norval Geldenhuys, op. cit., p. 422.

[30] J. W. McGarvey, The Fourfold Gospel (Cincinnati, Ohio: The Standard Publishing Company, n.d.), p. 283.

[31] Norval Geldenhuys, op. cit., p. 422.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The law and the prophets were until John,.... Till the time that John the Baptist began his ministry; for till then, the law and the prophets, with the Hagiographa, or holy writings, for into these three parts the Jews divided the books of the Old Testament, were the only writings they had; and which contained the whole of the revelation granted to them; and which they wrested, and put false glosses on; and therefore it was no wonder that they derided Christ, and despised his ministry: and whereas spiritual things were promised in these writings, under the notion of temporal ones; which they not understanding, might imagine the doctrine of Christ, concerning the contempt of worldly riches, was contrary to: and since they valued themselves on having the law and the prophets, Christ observes, that

since that time, the kingdom of God is preached; the Gospel, and the mysteries of relating to the kingdom of the Messiah, his person, office, and grace; and to the kingdom of grace, which lies not in outward, but in inward and spiritual things; and to the kingdom of heaven, or glory hereafter; and which is a superior dispensation to that of the law and the prophets, and sets things in a clearer, plainer, and better light:

and every man presseth into it; the Gospel dispensation, the kingdom of the Messiah; "that he may enter into it", as the Syriac and Persic versions add; which the Scribes and Pharisees did all they could to hinder; see Matthew 23:13 large multitudes crowded the ministry of John, of Christ, and of his apostles; the people flocked in great numbers to hear the word, and seemed disposed to embrace the doctrines of the Gospel, and the ordinances of it; they pressed on one another to hear it, and through many difficulties, discouragements, and obstacles, the Pharisees threw in their way; there was scarce a man but seemed very desirous of attending upon the preaching of it, and pressed hard for it; and with much force and violence, with great eagerness and endeavour broke his way to it; though a different sense is given by others reading the words, and "every one suffers violence to himself for it", as the Arabic version; or "is oppressed for it", as the Ethiopic; that is, suffers reproach, contradiction, and persecution, for the sake of hearing it.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-16.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

5 The law and the prophets [were] until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it.

(5) The Pharisees despised the excellency of the new covenant with respect to the old, being ignorant of the perfect righteousness of the law; and Christ declares by the seventh commandment how they were false expounders of the law.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-16.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The law, etc. — (See Matthew 11:13).

and every man presseth, etc. — Publicans and sinners, all indiscriminately, are eagerly pressing into it; and ye, interested adherents of the mere forms of an economy which is passing away, “discerning not the signs of this time,” will allow the tide to go past you and be found a stranded monument of blindness and obstinacy.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-16.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

16. The law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it.

[And every one presseth into it.] These words may be varied into a sense plainly contrary; so far that they may either denote the entertainment or the persecution of the gospel. Saith Beza: Every one breaketh into it by force; which points at the former sense of these words. Vulgar: Every one commits violence upon it: which points to the latter. I have admitted of the former, as that which is the most received sense of that passage in Matthew 11:12: but the latter seems more agreeable in this place, if you will suppose a continued discourse in our Saviour from verse 15, and that one verse depends upon another. They do indeed seem independent, and incoherent one with another; and yet there is no reason why we may not suppose a connexion, though at the first view it is not so perspicuous. We may observe the manner of the schools in this very difficulty. In both the Talmuds, what frequent transitions are there infinitely obscure and inextricable at first sight, and seemingly of no kind of coherence; which yet the expositors have made very plain and perspicuous, very coherent with one another.

I would therefore join and continue the discourse in some such way as this: "You laugh me to scorn, and have my doctrine in derision, boasting yourselves above the sphere of it, as if nothing I said belonged at all to you. Nor do I wonder at it; for whereas the Law and the Prophets were until John, yet did you deal no otherwise with them, but changed and wrested them at your pleasure by your traditions and the false glosses ye have put upon them. And when with John Baptist the kingdom of heaven arose and made its entry among you, every one useth violence and hostility against it, by contradiction, persecution, and laughing it to scorn. And yet, though you by your foolish traditions have made even the whole law void and of none effect, it is easier certainly for heaven and earth to pass away, than that one tittle of the law should fail. Take but an instance in the first and most ancient precept of the law, 'The man shall cleave unto his wife'; which you, by your traditions and arbitrary divorces, have reduced to nothing; but that still remains, and will remain for ever, in its full force and virtue; and he that puts away his wife (according to the licentiousness of your divorces) and marrieth another, committeth adultery."

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-16.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

The law and the prophets. See note on Matthew 11:13.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-16.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Entereth violently into it (εις αυτην βιαζεταιeis autēn biazetai). A corresponding saying occurs in Matthew 11:12 in a very different context. In both the verb βιαζεταιbiazetai occurs also, but nowhere else in the N.T. It is present middle here and can be middle or passive in Matthew, which see note. It is rare in late prose. Deissmann (Bible Studies, p. 258) cites an inscription where βιαζομαιbiazomai is reflexive middle and used absolutely. Here the meaning clearly is that everyone forces his way into the kingdom of God, a plea for moral enthusiasm and spiritual passion and energy that some today affect to despise.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-16.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Presseth

Rev., entereth violently. See on Matthew 11:12. Wyc., maketh violence into it. Tynd., striveth to go in.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-16.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it.

The law and the prophets were in force until John: from that time the Gospel takes place; and humble upright men receive it with inexpressible earnestness. Matthew 11:13.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-16.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

The law and the prophets [were] until John: from that time the gospel of the kingdom of God is preached, and every man entereth violently into it1.

  1. And every man entereth violently into it. On "the violent take it by force", see .

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-16.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Scofield's Reference Notes

the kingdom

(See Scofield "Matthew 11:12").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 16:16". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-16.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

16 The law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it.

Ver. 16. See Matthew 11:11.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-16.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Our Saviour in these words gives the Pharisees to understand that their contempt of his person and doctrine was the more inexcusable, because they lived in and under the clearest light of the gospel: the preaching of the law and the prophets continued but until John the Baptist came among you; since which time the gospel has been clearly preached both by him and myself unto you; and it has pleased God to give my doctrine great acceptation in the world. Though you Pharisees reject it, yet every one, that is, very many, press into it; so that the doctrine which you mock, the holy doctrine of the gospel, others will embrace. Yet lest, while Christ spoke thus highly of the gospel, the Pharisees should reproach him as a destroyer of the law, he shows that the obligation of the moral law was of eternal force, and that heaven and earth should sooner pass, than the obligation of the law cease; which yet the Pharisees most shamefully violated, particularly the seventh commandment, which they brake by permitting and practising divorces, upon upon unjustifiable grounds.

Learn hence, that the moral law, in all the branches of it, which is summarily comprehended in the ten commandments, is an eternal rule of life and manners, which is to stand in force as long as the world stands, and the frame of heaven and earth endures.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-16.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

16.] See Matthew 11:12 and note. After προφ. supply προεφήτευσαν, not (Meyer) ἐκηρύσσοντο, which would be inapplicable to the law and the prophets.

The connexion is,—‘Ye are they that justify yourselves before men; ye are no publicans and sinners,—no poor and needy,—but righteous, and increased with this world’s goods. But, since John, a kingdom has been preached, into which every one, publicans and sinners too ( πᾶς (98) πάντες, ch. Luke 15:1) are pressing in. The true relation however of that kingdom to the law is not as ye suppose, to destroy the law (Matthew 5:17), but to fulfil.’ Then, as an example, our Lord reiterates the decision which He had before given on a point much controverted among the Jews—the law of adultery. But this He does, not without occasion given, and close connexion with the circumstances, and with what had before been said. As early as Tertullian, cont. Marc. iv. 34, vol. ii. p. 443, it was remarked, that an allusion was meant here to the adultery of Herod Antipas with his brother Philip’s wife, which the Pharisees had tacitly sanctioned, thus allowing an open breach of that law which Christ came to fulfil. To this mention of Herod’s crime the μέχρι ἰωάννου gave relevance. Still the idea must not be too lightly assumed. Bleek’s remark is worth notice, that, had such an allusion been intended, the last words of the verse would have been otherwise expressed. Antipas had not married a divorced woman, but abduced a married woman from her husband.

See on Matthew 5:32.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-16.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1548

PRESSING INTO THE KINGDOM

Luke 16:16. The law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it.

WHEREVER the Gospel is preached with fidelity and earnestness, the places of worship are, for the most part, well attended. And this is often made a ground of joyful congratulation. But if, instead of comparing the attendance of persons at such places of worship with that which is seen at other Churches, we were to compare it with what took place at the first introduction of Christianity, we should see in it nothing but an occasion of shame and sorrow. Under the law and the prophets, that is, during the Mosaic dispensation, there was but little of preaching: but when John, the forerunner of our Lord, came, he preached much and often; and so powerful were his ministrations, that persons of all ranks and orders pressed into that kingdom, which he sought and laboured to establish. Let us then, for our humiliation, consider,

I. The effects of John’s preaching—

“He preached the kingdom of God”—

[By “the kingdom of God” I understand, the kingdom of the Messiah, or the reign of Christ in the world and in the heart. He declared that Christ was come: and he pointed him out to the people as “that very Lamb of God who taketh away the sins of the world.” He called men to repentance, and to an acknowledgment of the Saviour, by being baptized in his name; and announced that as the sure and only way of obtaining the remission of their sins [Note: Luke 3:3.] — — —]

Immediately, such was the impression on all descriptions of persons, that “every one pressed into it”—

[Most surprising was the effect of his ministrations. Persons flocked from every quarter, to be baptized of him. Pharisees and Sadducees, distant as they were from each other in their principles, equally felt the power of his word, and came to be baptized of him. Nay, all Jerusalem, and all Jud ζa, and all the region round about Jordan, were so wrought upon, that they actually submitted to his baptism, making public confession of their sins [Note: Matthew 3:5-7.]. They sought instruction also from him, every one (soldiers, publicans, and the people generally) being willing and desirous to approve his sincerity before God, by abandoning all the evils to which he had been particularly prone, and by practising those duties which would most adorn his holy profession [Note: Luke 3:10-14.]. Many of them, it is to be feared, went back afterwards: but such, at the time, was the power of the Gospel as ministered by him.]

Let us compare with this,

II. The effect of Gospel ordinances in our day—

We preach the kingdom of God, even as he did—

[Our blessed Lord commanded, that “repentance and remission of sins should be preached among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem [Note: Luke 24:47.]:” and the Apostles obeyed this injunction, preaching this doctrine to the Jews first [Note: Acts 5:31.], and afterwards to the Gentiles [Note: Acts 20:21.]. The same injunction, also, do we obey. You yourselves will bear us witness, that the great subject of all our ministrations is, “repentance towards God, and faith in our Lord Jesus Christ.” Yea, like St. Paul, “we have determined to know nothing among you, save Jesus Christ, and him crucified [Note: 1 Corinthians 2:2.]. We proclaim the Lord Jesus to be “King in Zion:” we call upon you to submit yourselves to him: we declare that “his blood was shed for the sins of the whole world [Note: 1 John 2:2.];” and that “all who believe in him shall be justified from all things, from which they could not be justified by the law of Moses [Note: Acts 13:38-39.].” In this respect we have even the advantage of John the Baptist: for he could only proclaim what the Lord Jesus should do; whereas we declare to you what he has done — — —]

And what is the effect of our ministrations?

[Do we see every one pressing into this kingdom? I had almost asked, Where we do see any one pressing into it as he ought? Alas! the word which we preach, “comes,” to the generality, “in word only, and not in power:” with many it is regarded only as “a cunningly-devised fable:” with many who approve of it, it has no practical effect: they are pleased with it only “as with the melody of one who plays well upon an instrument [Note: Ezekiel 33:31-32.]:” and, of those who feel somewhat of its power, how few press into the kingdom with that earnestness which becomes them! Look and see around; are there any “flocking unto the Lord, as doves to their windows [Note: Isaiah 60:8.]?” Where do we find people “pressing,” as it were, through all the obstacles which the world, the flesh, and the devil, can lay in their way, and “counting all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus their Lord [Note: Philippians 3:8.]?” Let the state of our auditors in general be viewed, and there is reason to weep over them with floods of tears. And let even the more approved amongst us be brought to the test of Scripture experience, and of by far the greater number we must “stand in doubt, whether Christ be indeed as yet truly formed in them [Note: Galatians 4:19-20.].”]

Address—

1. Those who are but little influenced by what they hear—

[Ah! how many of you are of this description! And are you content that it shall be always thus? Will you still hold fast the delusion that you shall win the race without running, and gain the victory without fighting? If success be not the portion of those who so demean themselves in relation to earthly things, how can you imagine it will in reference to heavenly things? Will it be no matter of regret to you in a dying hour, that you have been so supine and careless? or, if Satan be permitted to blind you then, will it be no grief to you when you shall open your eyes in the eternal world? O awake from your stupor: and “to-day, whilst it is called today, harden not your hearts, lest God should swear, in his wrath, that you shall never enter into his rest [Note: Hebrews 3:7-11.].”]

2. Those who feel some desire to enter into the kingdom—

[I thank God, if there be in any of you a good desire. But did you never hear what our blessed Lord has said, that “many shall seek to enter into the kingdom, and not be able [Note: Luke 13:24.].” How comes this? They seek, with good desires; but they do not strive with the full bent and determination of their hearts. But this is necessary, indispensably necessary, to the attainment of God’s heavenly kingdom. The pursuit of it must be regarded by you as “the one thing needful [Note: Luke 10:42.].” It must be entered upon with the same spirit as David manifested, when he said, “One thing have I desired of the Lord, which I will seek: after [Note: Psalms 27:4.].” You must engage in it “with all your might [Note: Ecclesiastes 9:10.]:” and, instead of ever looking upon your attainments with complacency, or feeling yourselves at liberty to relax your ardour, you must, with Paul, “forget what is behind, and reach forward to that which is before, and press towards the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus [Note: Philippians 3:13-14.].” There must be “no looking back, after you have once put your hand to the plough [Note: Luke 9:62.];” “no weariness in well-doing [Note: Galatians 6:9.]:” you must “endure unto the end, if ever you would be saved [Note: Matthew 10:22.]:” and, like the manslayer, never rest a moment, till you enter the gates of the heavenly city [Note: Numbers 35:11-12.].]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/luke-16.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 16:16. νόμος, the law) Supply the predicate have prophesied (prophetizaverunt), [answering to the antithetic expression, εὐαγγελίζεται, the Gospel kingdom of God is preached.— καὶ πᾶς, and every one) Comp. ch. 15. [Then drew near all the publicans and sinners, etc.]— βιάζεται) with pious violence presses into it (assails it). Resolve the sentence thus, πᾶς ( βιαζόμενος,) εἰς αὐτὴν διὰ τῆς βίας εἰσέρχεται.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-16.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

We had the sum of these words: See Poole on "Matthew 11:12" and See Poole on "Matthew 11:13". The connection of these words in this place seems to be this: Do not think it strange that I preach some doctrines to you which seem new to you, though indeed they are no other than was before contained in the precepts of the Old Testament; for the law and the prophets, the preaching of them, held but till John, since whose time the gospel hath been preached, which gives you a clearer light into the will of God than you had before; and it pleaseth God to give it a great acceptation in the world, though you reject it;

every man presseth, that is, many press, into it; so as God will not want a people, though you mock and deride the gospel, instead of embracing of it, as you ought to do.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 16:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-16.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

до Иоанна Служение Иоанна Крестителя характеризовало поворотный пункт в истории искупления. До него великие истины Христа и Его Царства были сокрыты в символах и намеках закона и обещаны в письменах пророков (ср. 1Пет. 1:10-12). Но Иоанн Креститель представил Самого Царя (см. пояснение к Мф. 11:11).Фарисеи, которые считали себя знатоками закона и пророков, не заметили величие Того Пророка, на Которого указывали закон и пророки.

всякий усилием входит в него Ср. Иер. 29:13. Пока фарисеи противились Христу, грешники толпами входили в Его Царство. Это выражение говорит о безудержной силе, вероятно, означающей рвение, с которым грешники от всего сердца стремились войти в Царство (см. пояснения к 13:24; Ис. 55:6, 7; Мф. 11:12).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-16.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Were until John; see notes on Matthew 11:12-13.

Every man; the Saviour alludes to the fact that the despised publicans and sinners are pressing into the kingdom of heaven, while the proud Pharisees reject it.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-16.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“The law and the prophets were until John, from that time the Good News of the Kingly Rule of God is preached, and every man enters violently into it (or ‘every man is overpowered by it’).”

Their next major failure lay in their having failed to recognise God’s intervention in history. They professed to honour the Law and the Prophets, and that was good in so far as it was true, but they had failed to recognise that with the coming of John the Baptiser, and especially in His own coming, these were in process of fulfilment. Now as promised by Isaiah 61:1-2 the Good News of the Kingly Rule of God (Luke 4:43; Luke 8:1; Acts 8:12) was being proclaimed, and men were ‘pressing into it with great violence’. They were ‘striving to enter in at the narrow door’ (Luke 13:24). They were ‘taking up their crosses and following Him’ (Luke 14:27; Luke 9:23). A great work of revival was taking place. The Pharisees themselves, on the other hand, having failed to recognise it, were failing to enter. That was their problem. They were so bound by their own teaching that they failed to recognise heavenly realities. And in the same way they also failed to recognise the dangers of wealth and divorce, which hit at the very root of men’s lives.

Alternately the verb can be translated as in the passive voice in which case it means ‘every man is overpowered by it’. Then we may see it as signifying that the fire of His word, which He has cast on the earth, has possessed them (Luke 12:49), the Kingly Rule of God has overpowered them and taken them captive.

Whichever is the case the ‘all’ refers to the disciples to whom He had spoken the previous parable. In contrast with the Pharisees they have revealed their determination to be under the Kingly Rule of God.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-16.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16.Until John—God’s law and the prophets, which condemn wickedness in the highest as well as the lowest, reached as far as John, the rebuker of Herod’s adultery.

Every man—Even this crowd of publicans and sinners.

Presseth—Pushes himself in with whatever success he may.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-16.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Hebrew Scriptures should have been of primary importance to the Pharisees. They pointed to the coming of Messiah. Since John the Baptist had come the message that he and Jesus had proclaimed had been that the Messiah was present and the kingdom was at hand. A new era had begun with John"s preaching, not the kingdom. The Pharisees had disregarded that preaching and in doing so had rejected the teaching of the Old Testament even though their fellow Jews were trying to get into the kingdom (cf. Luke 13:24; Luke 14:15; Mark 7:8-9).

The fact that Jesus said something similar about the kingdom on another occasion that Matthew recorded has raised questions about Jesus" meaning here and there (cf. Matthew 11:12-13). In Matthew, Jesus" point was this. The Jewish religious leaders were trying to bring in the kingdom in their own carnal way while refusing to accept God"s way that John and Jesus announced. In the different teaching situation that Luke recorded, Jesus said something similar but slightly different. His point here was that many of the Jews were eager to enter the kingdom, but the religious leaders were hindering them by rejecting John and Jesus" ministries.

". . . those pressing into the kingdom must be at least as much in earnest as the violent men of Palestine who tried to bring in the kingdom by force of arms. In the context we may think of men like the astute steward." [Note: Morris, p251.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-16.html. 2012.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 16:16 = Matthew 11:12-13, inverted, introduced here in view of Luke 16:31.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-16.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The law and the prophets, &c. Not that the law was made void by the coming of John [the Baptist], but that what the law and the prophets had taught, had been suited to the very imperfect dispositions of the Jews, who as yet were incapable of relishing perfect virtue. At the coming of John, the gospel began to be preached, and this called men to a life of perfect sanctity. (St. Thomas Aquinas) --- Our Saviour came not to destroy, but to fulfil the law and the prophets. (Matthew v. 17.)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-16.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

The law. See note on Matthew 5:17.

since that time = since (Greek. apo. App-104.) then.

the kingdom of God. See App-114.

preached. Greek. euangelizo. See App-121.

every man. Greek. pas, all. Put by Figure of speech Synecdoche (of the Genus), App-6, for many. "But not ye! "

presseth. See note on Matthew 11:12.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it.

The Law and the Prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it. 'While publicans and sinners are eagerly pressing into the kingdom of God, ye, interested adherents of the mere forms of an economy which is passing away, "discerning not the signs of this time," are allowing the tide to go past you, and will be found a stranded monument of blindness and obstinacy.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-16.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

16. The Law of Moses and the writings. See notes on Matthew 11:12-13.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-16.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) The law and the prophets were until John.—See Notes on Matthew 11:14-15. What had then been said to the disciples of the Baptist is now reproduced to our Lord’s own disciples and to the Pharisees. The latter had closed their eyes to the fact that all previous revelations led up to the work of John, as that in its turn was preparatory for the work of Christ.

Every man presseth . . .—The fact asserted, that of a “rush,” as we should say, into the Kingdom, but a rush from which the Pharisees had held aloof, answers to the stronger expression in St. Matthew (Matthew 11:12), “the violent take it by force.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-16.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it.
Law
29,31; Matthew 11:9-14; John 1:45; Acts 3:18,24,25
the kingdom
9:2; 10:9,11; Matthew 3:2; 4:17; 10:7; Mark 1:14
and every
7:26-29; Matthew 21:32; Mark 1:45; John 11:48; 12:19
Reciprocal: Exodus 19:24 - but let;  Matthew 3:5 - GeneralMatthew 11:12 - from;  Matthew 12:28 - then;  Matthew 17:3 - Elias;  Luke 17:20 - when the;  John 5:4 - first;  Acts 20:25 - preaching;  Acts 24:14 - in the law;  Philippians 3:14 - press;  Hebrews 4:11 - Let;  Revelation 22:6 - the holy

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-16.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Luke 16:16.The Law and the Prophets were till John Our Lord had said that the earnestness of the people was a prelude to those things which the Prophets had foretold as to the future renovation of the Church. He now compares the ministry of John to the Law and the Prophets “It is not wonderful,” he tells us, “that God should now act so powerfully on the minds of men; for he is not as formerly, seen at a distance under dark shadows, but appears openly and at hand for the establishment of his kingdom.” Hence it follows, that those who obstinately reject John’s doctrine are less excusable than those who despised the Law and the Prophets

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:16". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-16.html. 1840-57.