Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 17:19

And He said to him, "Stand up and go; your faith has made you well."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Faith;   Jesus, the Christ;   Miracles;   Samaria;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Home;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Stories for Children;   The Topic Concordance - Faith/faithfulness;   Wholeness;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Leper;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Miracle;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Eschatology;   Tribulation, the;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Gareb;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Salvation;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jesus Christ;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Complacency;   Consciousness;   Cures;   Ideas (Leading);   Mission;   Physician (2);   Purification (2);   Reality;   Salvation;   Samaria ;   Thanksgiving ;   Toleration, Tolerance;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Miracles;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thy faith hath made thee whole - Thy faith hath been the means of receiving that influence by which thou hast been cleansed.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Go thy way - To the “priest;” for without “his” certificate he could not again be restored to the society of his friends, or to the public worship of God. Having now appropriately expressed your gratitude, go to the priest and obey the law of God. Renewed sinners, while their hearts overflow with gratitude to Jesus, “express” that gratitude by obeying God, and by engaging in the appropriate duties of their calling and of religion.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-17.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he said unto him, Arise, and go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole.

Ingratitude was punished, and gratitude was rewarded. The nine received physical healing; the one received in addition the salvation of his soul. "Jesus commended only the faith which said, `Thank you'!"[27]

ENDNOTE:

[27] Anthony Lee Ash, op. cit., p. 80.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he said unto him, arise,.... For, as yet, he lay at his feet upon his face, adoring and praising him; nor did he attempt to rise till Jesus bid him: adding,

go thy way; to thine own country, town, or city, and to thy friends and relations, and about thy business:

thy faith hath made thee whole: or "saved thee", in soul, as well as body; that is, Christ, the object of faith, had saved him; for his salvation is ascribed to his faith, not as the efficient cause of it, but as that was wrought in him, and drawn forth from him, and exercised by him, in receiving this blessing from Christ, the author of it, even both corporeal and spiritual salvation.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-17.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Arise — for he had “fallen down on his face at His feet” (Luke 17:16) and there lain prostrate.

faith made thee whole — not as the others, merely in body, but in that higher spiritual sense with which His constant language has so familiarized us.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-17.html. 1871-8.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he said unto him, Arise, and go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole1.

  1. Arise, and go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole. Thus Jesus emphasized the fact that the blessing came through faith, encouraging the man to seek higher blessings by the same means.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

19 And he said unto him, Arise, go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole.

Ver. 19. Thy faith hath made thee whole] Whole on both sides. Thus gratitude ingratiates with Christ, and gets more grace.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-17.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 17:19

I. Of the unthankfulness which so seriously depresses and blights our whole modern Christian life, one reason, in many cases, is that we do not see our great Benefactor. I do not forget that some of us may feel true gratitude to those human friends who have been kind to us in years past, and who are now out of sight. But take men in the mass, and it is quite otherwise. Little by little, as the years pass, too many of us forget the benefits that we owe to the dead. The pressure, the importunity of the present and of the seen makes us overlook the great debt of thought and love which we owe to the past and the unseen. Then God's very generosity only provokes our unthankfulness. He keeps out of sight, and we take it for granted that He would show Himself if He could, that His agency is only invisible because it is shadowy or unreal.

II. A second cause of unthankfulness is our imperfect appreciation of God's gifts. The true source of this is that dulness, that harshness of spiritual perception which health and prosperity too often inflict upon the soul. We cannot see clearly through the thick film which has thus been formed over the spiritual eye. If we did see, we should own with full and thankful hearts that love is love, blessings are blessings, salvation is salvation, whether we share them with the many or the few.

III. And a third reason in many minds against cultivating and expressing thankfulness to God—men do not mention it, but it is the utilitarian one—men do not see the good of thankfulness. The value of prayer, of course, in Christian eyes is plain enough. Christians believe that certain blessings are to be obtained from God through the instrumentality of prayer, and not to obey is to forfeit the blessings which prayer obtains. "But thankfulness," men say to themselves, "what does it win for us that is not already ours without it? God blesses us out of the joy of doing so; and whether we thank Him or not must be of small concern to such a Being as He is." Certainly, God does not expect to be repaid for His benevolence by any equivalent in the way of thanksgiving that you or I can possibly offer Him. And yet He will have us thank Him, not for His own sake, but for ours. Just as prayer is the recognition of our dependence upon God amid the darkness and uncertainties of the future, so thankfulness is the recognition of our indebtedness to God for the blessings of the past. And to acknowledge truth like this is always moral strength; to refuse to acknowledge truth like this is always moral weakness.

H. P. Liddon, Christian World Pulpit, vol. viii., p. 129.


Reference: Luke 17:19.—G. Macdonald, Miracles of Our Lord, p. 93.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-17.html.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

19.] σέσωκέν σε—in a higher sense than the mere cleansing of his leprosy—theirs was merely the beholding of the brazen serpent with the outward eyes,—but his, with the eye of inward faith; and this faith saved him;—not only healed his body, but his soul.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-17.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 17:19. πορεύου, go thy way) It was not befitting at that time, that the Samaritan should remain long with Him.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

It is a wonderful thing to observe what small rudiments and embryos of faith Christ encourages and rewards. His faith appeareth to be no more than a persuasion that Christ did not do what things he did of this nature by any magical art, (as the Pharisee blasphemed), but by the power of God, and that he was a man sent of God. This faith Christ honours, commends, rewards. Faith is to be measured from the revelation which he who believeth hath, and from the opposition which he encounters: a little faith upon a little light, and maintained against a great opposition, is a great faith; though little in itself, yet great with respect to the circumstances of him or her that believeth.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 17:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-17.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

спасла тебя Иначе «сделала тебя здоровым» (ср. Мф. 9:22; см. пояснение к Мк. 5:34).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-17.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Thy faith hath made thee whole; his confidence in Christ was the means, and the power of Christ the cause of his cure.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And he said to him, “Arise, and go your way. Your faith has made you whole.” ’

Then He turned to the man and declared that his faith had ‘saved him’, had made him whole. Thus it is made clear that non-Jews also could find salvation through faith in Jesus. The idea is not that the other nine were not saved. It is in order to stress that this ‘stranger’ was saved.

The Future Glorious Appearing of The Son of Man (Luke 17:20-25).

The Pharisees are aware of Jesus’ continual teaching concerning the coming of the Kingly Rule of God and approach Him to ask Him when it is coming. But their problem is that they are looking for the wrong thing. It is their view that the Messiah, once he has come, will in some way overturn the Romans, and will then establish Israel as a free, independent nation whose influence will reach out to the world, with them in overall authority. Thus they are looking for the establishment of a physical kingdom on earth of a type like other kingdoms (the kingdom of Herod, the kingdom of Philip, and so on). They have failed to recognise that much of what the prophets had promised could not in fact be fulfilled in a physical kingdom, and that Jesus had come bringing something better, the everlasting Kingdom promised by the prophets.

In His reply Jesus will bring out firstly that the Kingly Rule of God is already here and is being entered by those who believe in Him and follow Him, and secondly that the finalisation of that Kingly Rule will take place when He comes in glory. Thus they can be sure that any Messiah who comes in any other way is false. Such a one will not be the Son of Man as revealed in Daniel 7:13-14.

The passage can be analysed as follows:

a Being asked by the Pharisees, when the Kingly Rule of God is coming, He answered them and said, “The Kingly Rule of God is not coming with observation, nor will they say, Lo, here! or, There! for lo, the Kingly Rule of God is within (or ‘among’) you” (Luke 17:20-21).

b He said to the disciples, “The days will come, when you will desire to see one of the days of the Son of man, and you will not see it” (Luke 17:22).

c “They will say to you, ‘Lo, there!’ ‘Lo, here!’ Go not away, nor follow after them” (Luke 17:23).

b “For as the lightning, when it lightens out of the one part under the heaven, shines to the other part under heaven, so shall the Son of man be in His day” (Luke 17:24).

a “But first must He suffer many things and be rejected of this generation” (Luke 17:25).

Note that in ‘a’ the earthly aspect of the Kingly Rule of God is stressed, and in the parallel it is dependent on the earthly suffering and rejection of the Son of Man. In ‘b’ there will be days when men desire to see the day of the Son of Man and will not see it, and in the parallel when His Day comes it will be in splendour as bright as lightning. And centrally in ‘c’, once He has suffered, men are not to go looking for Him here on earth, (because when He does come it will be in glory that is revealed to the whole world). The centrality of this emphasises its importance. The purpose of this passage is finally in order to warn His disciples that in the coming days after He is gone they are not to be so overburdened with their task that they welcome some pseudo-Messiah.

But within it also we have a summary of Jesus’ teaching concerning the present Kingly Rule of God and the glorious appearing of Himself as the Son of Man, which can only take place after He has suffered. It is in the light of this that all His previous teaching must be seen.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-17.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

19.Go thy way—Thou hast shown thyself to thy great High Priest; thou art made pure in body and pronounced pure in soul by him, and thou needest no other endorsement.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-17.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 17:19. Thy faith hath made thee whole, or ‘saved thee.’ Salvation in the highest sense is meant. The faith which the man had manifested was more than the faith of the other nine; it was a hand opened to receive higher spiritual blessings. The man’s obedience, praise to God, gratitude, love, were only evidences of ‘faith.’ Real faith manifests itself in obedience and love. As leprosy most aptly represents our sinfulness, so our Lord’s dealings with lepers most plainly illustrate His method in saving us from sin.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-17.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 17:19. : that might be all that Jesus said (so in [138]), as it was the man’s gratitude, natural feeling of thankfulness, not his faith, that was in evidence. But Lk., feeling that it was an abrupt conclusion, might add . . . to round off the sentence, which may therefore be the true reading.

[138] Codex Vaticanus (sæc. iv.), published in photographic facsimile in 1889 under the care of the Abbate Cozza-Luzi.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-17.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Thy faith hath made thee whole. Were not the others also made whole? They were cleansed indeed from their leprosy, but it no where appears that they were justified in their souls like this Samaritan, of whom it said, thy faith hath made thee whole; whereas it was said of the others, that they were made clean, viz. of their leprosy in their body, though not justified in their soul: this the Samaritan alone seems to have obtained. (Maldonatus)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-17.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he said unto him, Arise, go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole.

And he said unto him, Arise - for he was on his face at Jesus' feet, and there, it seems, lay prostrate.

Go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole - not as the others, merely in body, but in that higher spiritual sense with which His constant language has so familiarized us.

For Remarks on this section, see those on the sections referred to in the exposition.

As usual in this portion of our Gospel, we have no notice of time or place. (See opening remarks at Luke 9:51.) To meet the erroneous views not only of the Pharisees, but of the disciples themselves, our Lord addresses both, announcing the coming of the Kingdom under different aspects.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) Thy faith hath made thee whole.—The verb, elsewhere rendered, as in Luke 7:50, “hath saved thee,” is obviously used here so as to include both its higher and lower meanings. The nine had had sufficient faith for the restoration of the health of their body; his had gone further, and had given a new and purer life to his soul.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he said unto him, Arise, go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole.
thy faith
7:50; 8:48; 18:42; Matthew 9:22; Mark 5:34; 10:52
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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-17.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

19.Thy faith hath saved thee. The word save is restricted by some commentators to the cleanness of the flesh. (339) But if this be the case, since Christ commends the lively faith of this Samaritan, it may be asked, how were the other nine saved? for all of them without exception obtained the same cure. (340) We must therefore arrive at the conclusion, that Christ has here pronounced a different estimate of the gift of God from that which is usually pronounced by ungodly men; namely, that it was a token or pledge of God’s fatherly love. The nine lepers were cured; but as they wickedly efface the remembrance of the grace of God, the cure itself is debased and contaminated by their ingratitude, so that they do not derive from it the advantage which they ought. It is faith alone that sanctifies the gifts of God to us, so that they become pure, and, united to the lawful use of them, contribute to our salvation. Lastly, by this word Christ has informed us in what manner we lawfully enjoy divine favors. Hence we infer, that he included the eternal salvation of the soul along with the temporal gift. The Samaritan was saved by his faith How? Certainly not because he was cured of leprosy, (for this was likewise obtained by the rest,) but because he was admitted into the number of the children of God, and received from His hand a pledge of fatherly kindness.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-17.html. 1840-57.