Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 17:33

Whoever seeks to keep his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life will preserve it.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jerusalem;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Paradox;   Persecution;   Worldliness;   The Topic Concordance - Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   Life;   Losing and Things Lost;   Salvation;  
Dictionaries:
CARM Theological Dictionary - Eschatology;   Tribulation, the;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Cain (1);   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Common Life;   Discourse;   Ideas (Leading);   Individualism;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Mental Characteristics;   Pleasure;   Prudence;   Salvation;   Saviour (2);   Soul;   Spirit ;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Parousia;   Perdition;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Whosoever shall seek to save his life - These or similar words were spoken on another occasion. See on Matthew 10:39; (note); Matthew 16:25, Matthew 16:26; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

See the notes at Matthew 10:39.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-17.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Luke 17:33

Shall lose it

Life through death

I.
IT IS COMMONLY REQUIRED OF US TO SACRIFICE A LOWER GOOD, IN ORDER TO GAIN A HIGHER. Not always, but almost always. The good things of this world are of several sorts, very unlike one another. Consider the sensualist, the man of pleasure, what is called the man of the world. Now it is idle to say, that the pleasures of sense are not real pleasures. Pleasure is not altogether out of the question amongst higher things, as is proved by such examples as those of Pericles, Caesar, and Bonaparte; but pleasure supreme is simply fatal to a great career. It may give you an Alcibiades, but never a Leonidas. So, too, of money. Here again it is idle to say that money is of no account. All that is higher, and all that is lower, must be cheerfully given up. Money must be the one thing he goes for. This, indeed, is the price of money, as of everything else; and he must pay it. But, at all events, he must give up the lower good. He must not be a man of the world. He must be abstemious in eating; temperate in drinking; temperate in all things. He must rein in his appetite. Good personal habits--habits of self-restraint, must be well established. And so of fame. But neither the scholar, the artist, nor the orator, must be idle, or avaricious. The lore of pleasure and the love of money are both of them fatal to these higher aims. Learning grows puny and trivial, when waited on by sensual delights; while the love of gain eats into it like rust. So, too, of art. Growing either voluptuous, or sordid, it falls like an angel from heaven. And so of eloquence. It flies from lips that are steeped in pleasure; it will not quiver in fingers that clutch at gold. The ambition of scholarship, of art, of eloquence, is a lofty ambition, and it will not tolerate much baseness. The scholars of antiquity were, for the most part, severe and temperate men. The scholars of the Middle Ages were the cloistered and ascetic monks. The votaries of art, too, with rare exceptions, have wasted away in martyrdom to their calling. Thus it is that the Temple of Fame keeps a stern sentinel standing ever at her gateway of Corinthian brass. And every comer is challenged with such questions as these: Canst thou live on bread and water? Art thou willing to be poor? If not, avaunt! And so of all sorts of earthly good. Each sort has its price; and may be taken at that price. But two or more sorts may not ordinarily be taken by one and the same purchaser. The lower must be sacrificed to the higher. The coarser must give place to the finer. Such is the well-established method of our ordinary life. Every step of our earthly progress is a sacrifice. We gain by losing; grow by dwindling; live by dying. Our text, it is plain, is but an extension of this well-established method to the entire range and circle of our interests. What is seen to be true of earthly advantages considered in reference to one another, is here declared to be true of all these advantages together, when considered in relation to the life eternal. This world and the next world are set in opposition to each other. Body and soul are put at variance. And all that a man may win of worldly good, it is taught, he must be ready to sacrifice, if need be, in order to save his soul. You may call the demand a hard one; but all the analogies of our ordinary life endorse and favour it. In many dark corners of the earth are sitting men to-day, who have abandoned almost everything for Christ. And their feeling is that they have barely done their duty: that a necessity is laid upon them; that they must suffer for Christ; and by and by die for Him. And the stern warrant for it all is in our text: “He that findeth his life, shall lose it; and he that loseth his life for My sake, shall find it.” God be praised, if we, in our sphere, are spared the fullest execution of this warrant. The spirit of it, however, we may never wish to escape. Our hearts are to hold themselves always reedy for the fiercest discipline. Personal ease and comfort, houses and lands, friends, reputation, and even life itself, are to be reckoned cheap. We are to hold them in low esteem. So relaxed must be our grasp, that the slightest breath of persecution may suffice to sweep them swiftly and clean away.

II. The second law referred to, and the counterpart of the one we have now considered, is this: BY FIRST SECURING THE HIGHER GOOD, WE ARE PREPARED PROPERLY TO ENJOY THE LOWER, AND ARE MORE LIKELY TO SECURE IT. The principle is, that no worldly good of any sort can be well secured, or properly enjoyed, if pursued by itself and for its own sake. This may be seen in our most ordinary life. The man, whose aim is pleasure, may indeed, secure it for a while; but only for awhile. It soon palls upon his senses, disgusts and wearies him. It is easy of proof, that more is really enjoyed, more of mere pleasure is there, among business men, in the brief intervals of business, than among those with whom pleasure may be said to be a profession. Pleasure, in a word, is far sweeter as a recreation than a business. And so of gold. The man who strains all his energies of soul and body to the acquisition of it, never properly enjoys it. He enjoys the activity which the chase imposes upon him; but not the gold itself. He best enjoys gold, because he best knows the uses of it, who is occupied by higher thoughts and aims. It is God’s decree, that gold shining useless in a miser’s coffers, shall never gladden the one who gathered it. And so also of fame. If pursued for its own sake, the chase is often a bootless one. Selfish ambition almost always betrays itself, and then it provokes men to defeat and humble it. General Zachary Taylor, the twelfth President of the United States, spent forty years of his life in comparatively obscure, but very faithful service, at our Western outposts; receiving no applause from the country at large, and asking for none; intent only upon doing promptly and efficiently the duties laid upon him. By and by events, over which he had exercised no control, called him into notice upon a broader theatre. And then it was discovered how faithful and how true a man he was. The Republic, grateful for such a series of self-denying and important services, snatched him from the camp, and bore him, with loud acclaim, to her proudest place of honour. And this was done at the cost of bitterest disappointment to more than one, whose high claims to this distinction were not denied, but who had been known to be aspiring to the exalted seat. And so through our whole earthly life--in all its spheres, and in all its struggles. To lose is to find; to die is to live. It is so in our religion. We begin by abjuring all; we end by enjoying all. Am I charged with preaching that “gain is godliness”? Not so, my friend. But godliness is gain. It begins by denouncing and denying all; it ends by restoring all. First it desolates; then it rebuilds. Its mien, in approaching us, is stern and terrible. It blights our pleasures; strips us of our possessions; smites our friends; and lays our vaunted honours in the dust. And then, when all is done, when the desolating work is finished, when our very lives are spent and worried out of us, the scene changes as by a miracle, and all is given us anew. God, we find, is not merely in all; but He includes all, is all. And we learn, assuredly, from our own blessed experience, that “no good thing will He withhold from them that walk uprightly.” Nay, it is of the very essence of our religion to forget and deny ourselves. Two remarks seem to grow naturally out of our subject.

1. We may learn the great mistake committed by men of the world in their chase after worldly good. They make it an end.

2. We may learn why it is the happiness of Christians is so imperfect. (R. D.Hitchcock, D. D.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Luke 17:33". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/luke-17.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Whosoever shall seek to gain his life shall lose it: but whosoever shall lose his life shall preserve it.

This is a reiteration of the gospel message to all people. Those who run their lives as they please shall be lost. Those who submit to the lordship of Jesus Christ shall be saved.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Whosoever shall seek to save his life,.... By fleeing to some strong hold, or by continuing in the metropolis, and strongest city in the nation, Jerusalem:

shall lose it: there he will be in the greatest danger:

and whosoever shall lose his life; or expose it to danger, by fleeing to the mountains, or going to Pella, a small town beyond Jordan, of no strength, and where there might be thought no security;

shall preserve it; he shall be safe; See Gill on Matthew 16:25.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-17.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Whosoever shall seek to save his life shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose his life shall e preserve it.

(e) That is, will save it, as Matthew expounds it: for the life that is spoken of here is everlasting salvation.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-17.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Whosoever, etc. — (See on Luke 9:23-27).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-17.html. 1871-8.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

SANCTIFICATION AND GLORIFICATION

Luke 17:33. “Whosoever may seek to save his soul shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose it, shall find it.” The E. V. here says “life,” where I have translated “soul.” The Greek is not zoe, “life,” but psyche, the regular word always used for soul. If you will analyze the above translation contrastively with the E. V., you will find it much more harmonious with the uniform teaching of God’s Word. Where James speaks of the “double minded,” the Greek says “double souled,” making the application to the unsanctified Christian — the sinner having one bad soul; the wholly sanctified, one good soul and the unsanctified having the depraved soul with which he was born, but now in a subjugated state, an, also tile good soul imparted in regeneration, but involved in an irrepressible conflict with the old enemy which he found dwelling in the heart. Now, if you see: to save the soul with which you are born into the work after doing your best you will wake up in hell. But: you turn over that fallen soul, which is none other than old Adam, to Adam the Second, and let Him slay him with the sword of the Spirit, then you will find your bright, spotless, immortal soul. in coming eternity, triumphant among the angels and all right. Sanctification must qualify you for the bridehood of Christ and a place in the first resurrection. The Greek zoogoneo, translated “find,” has a wonderful signification, too ample and complex to be translated by any one word. We can only reach it by circumlocution. It is from zoon, “a living animal,” and ginomai, “to bring forth,” and is the word used in reference to the parturition of the animal kingdom; i.e., in which a living being is brought forth into life, liberty, and activity infinitely superior to that of the former state. Here it imparts a wonderful signification to the developments which await the living saints at the coming of the Lord, when both soul and body, though formerly alive, will leap into a sphere of life, liberty, glory, and felicity infinitely superior to the former physical life of the body and spiritual life of the soul which we here enjoy in the sanctified state. The illustration enforced by this word is inconceivably vivid and potent, contrasting the life of the glorified soul and body with that of the present state, as the aerial life of an animal is contrasted with its prenatal existence. So this word really means the glorification of the souls and bodies of the saints living on the earth when the Lord comes, as well as the resurrection of the sleeping generations, into an identical transfiguration glory.

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Godbey, William. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/luke-17.html.

People's New Testament

Whosoever shall seek to save his life. See notes on Matthew 10:39.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-17.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Shall preserve it (ζωογονησει αυτηνzōogonēsei autēn). Or save it alive. Here only in the N.T. except 1 Timothy 6:13; Acts 7:19. It is a late word and common in medical writers, to bring forth alive (ζωοσ γενωzōos genō) and here to keep alive.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Shall preserve ( ζωογονήσει )

Only here and Acts 7:19. Originally to engender; thence to produce alive or endue with life, and so to preserve alive. Wyc., shall quicken it.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-17.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Whosoever shall seek to save his life shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose his life shall preserve it.

The sense of this and the following verses is, Yet as great as the danger will be, do not seek to save your life by violating your conscience: if you do, you will surely lose it: whereas if you should lose it for my sake, you shall be paid with life everlasting. But the most probable way of preserving it now, is to be always ready to give it up: a peculiar Providence shall then watch over you, and put a difference between you and other men.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-17.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Whosoever shall seek to gain his life shall lose it: but whosoever shall lose [his life] shall preserve it1.

  1. Whosoever shall seek to gain his life shall lose it: but whosoever shall lose [his life] shall preserve it. If in that hour we be found seeking to save out carnal treasures, it will be a sign that we have lost the spiritual from our lives and have no heavenly treasures.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

The meaning is, that the most prudent and cautious will in some cases be lost, while others, exposed to the most imminent dangers, will be saved; in other words, that the confusion and destruction will be so terrible as to set all human calculations at defiance. Similar phraseology occurs in Matthew 10:39, but in a different connection, and different in sense.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-17.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

33 Whosoever shall seek to save his life shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose his life shall preserve it.

Ver. 33. {See Trapp on "Matthew 16:25"} {See Trapp on "Matthew 10:39"}

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-17.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 17:33. Whosoever shall seek to save his life, &c.— As in the whole of this discourse our Lord is speaking of the temporal calamities which were to befal the Jewish nation, his words in this verse must be interpreted accordingly intheir primary meaning: "Whoever, in order to save his life, shall flee into the city, because it is strongly fortified and garrisoned, shall meet with the destruction from which he is flying; whereas they shall be safe who flee into the open towns, and defenceless villages, which, in the opinion of many, may be thought equal to throwing away their lives." At the same time the words may undoubtedly be considered as of general interpretation, and be profitably applied to every private Christian.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-17.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

In this hour, when judgment is come upon Jerusalem, Christ declares, that whosoever shall take any unchristian course to preserve his life, by denying him and his holy religion, he shall lose eternal life; but he that for Christ's sake shall lose his natural life, instead of a mortal, shall enjoy an immortal life in bliss and glory.

Here we learn,

1. That the love of temporal life is a great temptation to men, to deny Christ and his holy religion, in a day of trial.

2. That the surest way to attain eternal life, is cheerfully to lay down our temporal life, when the glory of Christ, and the honor of religion, requires it of us. Christ farther adds, that in this terrible night of Jerusalem's calamity, when destruction comes upon her, the providence of God will remarkabley distinguish between one person and another: true believers, and constant professors, shall be delivered, and none else; such shall escape the danger, others shall fall by it.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-17.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

33.] See on Matthew 10:39, and ch. Luke 9:24. In connexion here, it leads the way to Luke 17:34-35.

ζητήσῃ should be rendered as a futurus exactus, as an aorist conjoined with a future always must be:—shall have sought, i.e. ‘during his preceding life,’—shall lose it then.

ζωογονήσει, vivipariet (Acts 7:19): an expressive word, derived from animal parturition, bringing forth to air and life what was before concealed in the womb. That day shall come as the pains of labour ( ὠδῖνες) on a woman in travail (Matthew 24:8): but to the saints of God it shall be the birth of the soul and body to life and glory everlasting. See St. Ignatius ad Rom. c. 6.” Wordsw.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-17.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 17:33. ζητήσῃ, shall have sought) [i.e. by delaying to flee to the Refuge]. See Luke 17:31-32.— ψυχὴν, life) We must understand this of the whole man, as distinguished from the natural or spiritual life, which are respectively determined and defined by whatever is added in the language of the passages where they are intended to be understood.— ζωογονήσει) [shall preserve alive: a word of the LXX.] See note, Acts 7:19.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

That is, whosoever, in disobedience to my command, shall use arts to preserve his life, shall lose it; and whosoever, at my command, shall be ready to lose it, shall preserve it, or if he loseth his breath, he shall preserve his soul. See Poole on "Matthew 10:39", See Poole on "Matthew 16:25", See Poole on "Mark 8:35".

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 17:33". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-17.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

См. пояснение к 14:11.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-17.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Seek to save his life; by disobeying the will of Christ. This declaration was fulfilled at the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, in respect to the temporal life of the Christians; and it will be fulfilled at the last day in its highest sense, in repsect to the eternal life of all believers, even though they may have been slain for Christ’s sake. Matthew 10:39.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Whoever will seek to gain his life will lose it, but whoever will lose his life shall preserve it.”

The third illustration is between those who cling to their lives of sin, like Lot’s wife, and thus perish, and those whose hearts, like that of Lot, are on the righteousness of God (2 Peter 2:7-8), in New Testament terms those who take up their cross and follow Christ (Luke 9:24 with 23).

So two examples of those whose eyes are to be fixed on God in Luke 17:31 are followed by the example of the one whose eyes were fixed on sin in Luke 17:32, and in this verse the two are contrasted. Furthermore these examples, which are very much in terms already applied to the disciples, emphasise the continuity between the disciples and those who will be alive in the ultimate day of Christ’s return. For between the Day of suffering and the Day of glory such tests may come again and again. In these three warnings we can see His instructions, not only for the time of the end, but also as those which are to be followed throughout the whole preceding period as they make themselves ready for that Day.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-17.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

33.Seek to save his life—By avoiding flight with Christians and taking share with the Jews.

Shall lose it—He will perish with the Jews.

Lose his life—By committing himself to the safe keeping of Christ alone.

Shall preserve it—From the destruction that awaits the Jewish capital.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-17.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 17:33. Shall seek to gain, etc. There are two views of this verse: (1.) The seeking to gain, takes place throughout the preceding life, and the loss at the final catastrophe. (2.) The seeking to gain, takes place at the catastrophe, and the loss at the decisive moment of the coming Christ Matthew 10:39, which refers to the whole previous life, favors the former view.

Whosoever shall have lost his life, i.e., shall not have counted his life dear to him in comparison with Christ.

Will preserve, or, ‘quicken’ it. The word is derived from animal parturition, as if the events of that day were represented as the pangs of travail resulting in the new and glorious life of the believer. Comp. Matthew 24:8. In this part of the verse, also, the reference to the whole preceding life seems more appropriate.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-17.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

life. Greek. psuche. See App-110.

his life = it.

preserve it = preserve it alive. Greek. zoogoneo. Occurs only here and in Acts 7:19. Repeated from Luke 9:24, Luke 9:25.

Matthew 10:39. Mark 8:35,

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Whosoever shall seek to save his life shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose his life shall preserve it.

Whosoever shall seek to save his life shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose his life shall preserve it. See the note at Matthew 10:39.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(33) Whosoever shall seek to save his life.—The better MSS. give a word which is rendered elsewhere by “purchase” (Acts 20:28; 1 Timothy 3:13), and perhaps always suggests, as the other word for “save” does not suggest, the idea of some transaction of the kind. So here, the man must purchase, as it were, his lower life at the price of the higher, and he will be a loser by the bargain.

Shall preserve it.—Here, again, the English verb is weak. Better, shall give life to it. The same Greek word occurs in the better MSS. of 1 Timothy 6:13, and is there rendered by “quicken,” and in its passive form in Acts 7:49, where it should be translated preserved alive, and this is clearly the meaning here. The man who is content to risk his natural life shall gain a life of a higher spiritual order.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Whosoever shall seek to save his life shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose his life shall preserve it.
9:24,25; Matthew 10:39; 16:25; Mark 8:35-37; John 12:25; Revelation 2:10
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 17:33". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-17.html.