Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 3:14

Some soldiers were questioning him, saying, "And what about us, what shall we do?" And he said to them, "Do not take money from anyone by force, or accuse anyone falsely, and be content with your wages."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Accusation, False;   Contentment;   False Teachers;   Injustice;   Integrity;   Righteousness;   Soldiers;   Wages;   Thompson Chain Reference - Awakenings and Religious Reforms;   Awakenings, Religious;   Business Life;   Capital and Labour;   Content-Discontent;   Contentment;   Employers (Masters);   Masters (Employers);   Wages;   The Topic Concordance - Contentment;   Deeds;   Lying/lies;   Violence;   Witness;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Armies;   Contentment;   Slander;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Genealogy;   Mary;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - John the baptist;   Justice;   Repentance;   War;   Work;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Baptize, Baptism;   John the Baptist;   Repentance;   Work;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Gospels;   Roman Empire;   Wages;   Holman Bible Dictionary - John;   Luke, Gospel of;   Ordinances;   Repentance;   Soldier;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - John the Baptist;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Army (2);   Asceticism (2);   Benedictus;   Common Life;   Confession (of Sin);   Eternal Punishment;   James ;   John the Baptist;   Soldiers;   Violence;   Wages;   Wandering Stars;   War ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Herod, Family of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Army;   Demand;   John the Baptist;   Luke, the Gospel of;   Sign;   Wages;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Christianity in Its Relation to Judaism;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The soldiers likewise demanded of him - He, thirdly, instructs those among the military. They were either Roman soldiers, or the soldiers of Herod or Philip. Use no violence to any, μηδενα διασεισητε, do not extort money or goods by force or violence from any. This is the import of the words neminein concutite, used here by the Vulgate, and points out a crime of which the Roman soldiers were notoriously guilty, their own writers being witnesses. Concussio has the above meaning in the Roman law. See Raphelius in loco.

Neither accuse any falsely - Or, on a frivolous pretense - μηδε συκοφαντησητε, be not sycophants, like those who are base flatterers of their masters, who to ingratiate themselves into their esteem, malign, accuse, and impeach the innocent. Bishop Pearce observes that, when the concussio above referred to did not produce the effect they wished, they often falsely accused the persons, which is the reason why this advice is added. See the note on Luke 19:7.

Be content with your wages - Οψωνιοις . The word signifies not only the money which was allotted to a Roman soldier, which was two oboli, about three halfpence per day, but also the necessary supply of wheat, barley, etc. See Raphelius.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The soldiers likewise - It seems that “they,” also came to his baptism. Whether these were Jews or Romans cannot be ascertained. It is not improbable that, as Judea was a Roman province, they were Jews or Jewish proselytes in the service of Herod Antipas or Philip, and so were really in the Roman service.

Do violence … - Do not take the property of any by unlawful force, or do not use unjust force against the person or property of any individual. it is probable that many of them were oppressive, or prone to violence, rapine, or theft, and burdensome even in times of peace to the inhabitants.

Neither accuse any falsely - It is probable that when they wished the property of others and could not obtain it by violence, or when there was no pretext for violence, they often attempted the same thing in another way, and falsely accused the persons of crime. The word rendered “falsely accused” is the one from which our word “sycophant” is derived. The proper meaning of the word “sycophant” was this: There was a law in Athens which prohibited the importation of “figs.” The “sycophant” (literally “the man who made figs to appear,” or who showed them) was one who made complaint to the magistrate of persons who had imported figs contrary to law, or who was an “informer;” and then the word came to be used in a general sense to denote “any” complainer - a calumniator - an accuser - an informer. As such persons were usually cringing and fawning, and looked for a reward, the word came to be used also to denote a fawner or flatterer. It is always used in a bad sense. It is correctly rendered here, “do not accuse any falsely.”

Be content … - Do not murmur or complain, or take unlawful means to increase your wages.

Wages - This word means not only the “money” which was paid them, but also their “rations” or daily allowance of food. By this they were to show that their repentance was genuine; that it had a practical influence; that it produced a real reformation of life; and it is clear that “no other” repentance would be genuine. Every profession of repentance which is not attended with a change of life is mere hypocrisy. It may farther be remarked that John did not condemn their profession, or say that it was unlawful to be a soldier, or that they must abandon the business in order to be true penitents. It was possible to be a good man and yet a soldier. What was required was that in their profession they should show that they were really upright, and did not commit the crimes which were often practiced in that calling. It is lawful to defend oneself, one‘s family, or one‘s country, and hence, it is lawful to be a soldier. Man everywhere, in all professions, should be a Christian, and then he will do honor to his profession, and his profession, if it is not a direct violation of the law of God, will be honorable.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-3.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Luke 3:14

And the soldiers likewise

The lawfulness of arms

The common argument, founded on this for the lawfulness of the military profession, seems unanswerable.
It is true that war is contrary to the mild spirit of Christianity, and that the guilt of it must be always chargeable, at least on one side. But there are several professions for which there would be no use, were it not for human depravity and injustice;
e.g., there would be no use for magistrates or for civil or criminal law at all, were it not for the lawless and disobedient. So, though it is often a delicate point to settle when war becomes just or necessary, its justice and necessity in some cases are beyond dispute, and therefore the employment of the soldier must, generally speaking, be a lawful one. But, to look no farther than to the authority before us, when soldiers under concern about salvation and the path of duty applied to John for direction, would that intrepid teacher have hesitated a moment, if their profession had been unlawful, to tell them so, and to exhort them to quit it immediately, whatever might have been the consequence? Instead of this, however, he tells them how to conduct themselves in it. (James Foote, M. A.)

Encouragement for soldiers

Notwithstanding the too general prevalence of impiety and immorality in the military life, there are many honourable exceptions. We read of the believing and humble centurion of Capernaum, who said that he was not worthy that Christ should come under his roof, and that if He would but speak the word his servant should be healed; which led our Lord to declare, that He had not found so great faith, no, not in Israel. We read, too, of Cornelius, a centurion of the Italian band, a devout man, who feared God with all his house, and gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God always, and to whom Peter was sent, more fully to instruct him. There is something peculiarly interesting in almost every case in which genuine religion decidedly influences the mind and conduct of a soldier. These principles must be sincere, and of considerable strength, which enable him to overcome the varied temptations with which he is beset. The trials of his physical and mental courage have been severe, and his opportunities of observation have been extensive. The result of all this is the obvious, and, in the eye of the enlightened Christian, the very adorning and engaging, union of frankness with caution, of complaisance with faithfulness, of meekness with manliness, and of the knowledge of the world, from which, however, he is separated, with the knowledge of God, in which he continues to grow, and under the influence and in the comfort of which he is prepared, if it be the will of God, to live, and equally prepared, if it be the will of God, to die. Let no soldier be so infatuated as to imagine, that his profession will be sustained as a satisfactory excuse for his impiety, when he comes to stand before the judgment-seat of God: for whatever be the difficulties in his way, he is offered Divine aid in proportion to these difficulties, if he apply for it. Let no soldier imagine that, because he is a soldier, irreligion, or profane swearing, or violence, or intemperance, or licentiousness in him, can possibly be passed over, unless he exercise repentance towards God and faith towards the Lord Jesus Christ, unless he be actually reformed and converted. On the other hand, let no soldier who is in earnest about his salvation be discouraged. Let him be prepared to set at nought the profane and unhandsome sneers with which he may expect to meet. Let him study at once to live like a Christian, and to be exemplary in the duties of his profession, and then even those who affect to despise will inwardly respect him, and even in their own estimations appear small before him. (James Foote, M. A. )

Outrages by soldiers

The soldiers, so necessary as a class in all such civil constitutions as those of the East, receive advice of which the Zabtiehs, or Turkish soldier-police, of today stand in great need; especially in provinces more remote from the capital. The outrages they commit, in violence done to men and women; and the false accusations which they bring to ruin them, would scarcely be believed here; and indeed they are mostly too shocking to relate. The writer remembers a case which occurred in Cyprus while he was there, where the Zabtieh had been too brutal and fiendish in his behaviour in the house of a newly-married couple. But not daring to resist him openly, the wife had managed to cajole him into drinking heavily, and when drunk the husband stabbed him to the heart. The soldierpoliceman is an object of dread in every country village. His coming can scarcely be looked upon as anything but a calamity. In many cases--always, indeed, in actual service--it would be hard fare for him to be content with his wages, or rations. But the people with whom they are quartered, or whom they come to “protect,” would doubtless be glad to give peaceably out of their deep poverty enough to support the soldiers, if they might thus be relieved of their violence and false accusations. (Professor Isaac H. Hall.)

Disastrous result of a false report

I have read that a foolish young English clerk--fond of practical jokes--once said to a friend, “Have you heard that E & Co., the bankers, have stopped payment?” He merely meant that the banking-house had, as usual, closed up for the night. But he amused himself by seeing how he had startled his friend. He did not stop to explain his real meaning. His friend mentioned the alarming report to another: the rumour spread. Next day there was a “ run upon the bank,” and Messrs. E & Co., were obliged to suspend payment. The silly youth did not mean to burn down the commercial credit of a prosperous house: he only meant to amuse himself by playing with fire. And a kindred mischief to his is perpetrated by every one who retails contemptible gossip, or gives birth to a scurrilous slander. “An abomination to the Lord is the false witness who speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren.” (Dr. Cuyler.)

Refusing to act unjustly

While Athens was governed by the thirty tyrants, Socrates, the philosopher, was summoned to the senate-house, and ordered to go with some other persons, whom they named, to seize one Leon, a man of rank and fortune, whom they determined to put out of the way, that they might enjoy his estate. This commission Socrates positively refused. “I will not willingly,” said he, “assist in an unjust act.” Chericles sharply replied, “Dost thou think, Socrates, to talk in this high tone, and not to suffer?” “Far from it,” replied he: “I expect to suffer a thousand ills, but not so great as to do unjustly.”

Example of contentment

John Wesselus of Groningen, who was one of the most learned men in the fifteenth century, and was, on account of his extensive attainments, called “the light of the world,” having been once introduced into the presence of the pope, was requested by that pontiff to ask for some favour for himself. “Then,” said Wesselus, “I beg you to give me out of the Vatican Library a Greek and a Hebrew Bible.” “You shall have them,” said Sixtus; “but, foolish man, why don’t you ask for a bishopric, or something of that sort?” Said Wesselus, “Because I do not want such things.”

Cato and Marius Curius

Care, a pattern of moderation, was very early taught the happy art of contentment, by the following circumstance:--Near his country seat was a cottage, formerly belonging to Marius Curius, who was thrice honoured with a triumph. Care often walked thither, and reflecting on the smallness of the farm and the meanness of the dwelling, used to meditate on the peculiar virtues of the man, who, though he was the most illustrious character in Rome, had subdued the fiercest nations, and driven Pyrrhus out of Italy, cultivated this little spot of ground with his own hands, and, after three triumphs, retired to his own cottage. Here the ambassadors of the Samnites found him in the chimney-corner dressing turnips, and offered him a large present of gold; but he absolutely refused it, remarking, “A man who can be satisfied with such a supper, has no need of gold; and I think it more glorious to conquer the possessors of it, than to possess it myself.” Full of these thoughts, Cato returned home; and taking a view of his own estates, his servants, and his manner of life, increased his labour, and retrenched his expenses.

The secret of contentment

An Italian bishop struggled through great difficulties, without repining or betraying the least impatience. One of his intimate friends, who highly admired the virtues which he thought it impossible to imitate, one day asked the prelate if he could communicate the secret of being always easy. “Yes,” replied the old man; “I can teach you my secret with great facility; it consists in nothing more than making a right use of my eyes.” His friend begged of him to explain himself. “Most willingly,” replied the bishop. “In whatever state I am, I first of all look up to heaven, and remember that my principal business here is to get there; I then look down upon the earth, and call to mind how small a place I shall occupy in it when I die and am buried; I then look abroad into the world, and observe what multitudes there are who are in all respects more unhappy than myself. Thus I learn where true happiness is placed; where all our cares must end; and what little reason I have to repine or to complain.”

Two sorts of blessings

“It is a great blessing to possess what one wishes,” said some one to an ancient philosopher; to which the wise man immediately replied, “It is a greater blessing still, not to desire what one does not possess.”

Contentment

Those who preach contentment to all, do but teach some how to dwell in misery; unless you will grant content desire, and chide her but for murmuring. Let not man so sleep in content, as to neglect the means of making himself more happy and blessed; nor yet, when the contrary of what he looked for comes, let him murmur at that providence which disposed it to cross his expectation. I like the man who is never content with what he does enjoy; but by a calm and fair course, has a mind still rising to a higher happiness. But I like not him who is so dissatisfied as to repine at anything that does befall him. Let him take the present patiently, joyfully, thankfully; but let him still be soberly in quest of better; and indeed it is impossible to find a life so happy here, as that we shall not find something we would add to it, something we would take away from it. The world itself is not a garden, wherein all the flowers of joy are growing; nor can one man enjoy the whole of those that are there. There is no absolute contentment here below; nor can we in reason think there should be; since whatsoever is created, was created tending to some end, and till it arrives at that end, it cannot be fully at rest. (Owen Felltham.)

Content with his position

Joe Martin, an Indian chief, residing in New Brunswick, was interrogated by a professional gentleman who held an important office under Government, whether he would accept the commission of a captain among the Indians, which, he observed, it was in his power to procure for him; to which the Indian made the following reply:--“Now Joe Martin love God, pray to God; now Joe Martin humble; certain not good to make Indian proud; when Indian proud, him forget God: for this reason Joe Martin never must be captain!” He accordingly declined it.

Contentment

It is not so much the large stars shining on a dark night that makes the sky luminous, but the multitude of little ones, all doing their best in their separate places. There are comparatively few of the large ones--not enough by any means to light up the infinite reaches of spacebetween us and them--and so here is the need of the little ones. Are you pining in your place for the honour of a large star? Be content; your mission is just as high a one as that of the largest orb that shines. Though not equal in size, you may yet be in brightness. Keep steadily to your appointed place, making all the light you can, and you are the largest star in the eyes of the great God who ruleth over all.

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Luke 3:14". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/luke-3.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And soldiers also asked him, saying, And we, what must we do? And he said unto them, Extort from no man by violence, neither accuse anyone wrongfully; and be content with your wages.

Even soldiers, just whose soldiers is not clear, were not considered beyond the bounds of redemption. They were not commanded to leave the army but to exhibit attitudes of restraint, truthfulness, and contentment. If these were Roman soldiers, the implications of these words from John must have been extremely distasteful to Israel.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the soldiers likewise demanded of him,.... Or "asked him": why our translators have rendered it, "demanded of him", I know not, unless they thought that such language best suited persons of a military character. Some think these were Gentile soldiers, since it does not look so likely that the Romans would employ Jews as soldiers in their own country; though it is more probable that they were Jews, in the pay of the Romans, who belonged to Herod, tetrarch of Galilee, or to Philip of Ituraea, whose dominions lay near the place where John was: since it is certain, that there were many of the Jews that betook themselves to a military life; and seeing John instructed them in no part of natural or revealed religion, but what was suitable to their character and employment: for upon these men saying,

what shall we do? to avoid the threatened ruin, and to prove the truth of our repentance, that so we may be admitted to the holy ordinance of baptism; John replied,

do violence to no man; or "shake" him, or put him, into bodily fear, by threatening, hectoring, and bullying him, and drawing the sword upon him, which is usual, upon the least offence, for such persons to do;

neither accuse any falsely, or play the sycophant; who, in order to flatter some, bring malicious accusations against others; and which was a vice that too much prevailed among the Jewish soldiery; who either to curry favour with the Roman officers and governors, would wrongfully accuse their fellow soldiers, or country men, to them; or in order to extort sums of money from them, that they might live in a more luxurious manner than their common pay would admit of: wherefore, it follows,

and be content with your wages; allowed by the government, and do not seek to increase them by any unlawful methods, as by mutiny and sedition, by rebelling against your officers, or by ill usage of the people. The Jewish Rabbins have adopted this word, אפסניא, into their language in the Misnic and Talmudic writingsF23Misn. Sanhedrin, c. 2. sect. 4. T. Bab. Sanhedrin, fol. 18. 2. & 21. 2. : and their gloss explains it by the money, for the soldiers, and the hire of soldiers, as here; and it includes every thing which by the Romans were given to their soldiers for pay, and which was food as well as money.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And the soldiers likewise demanded of him, saying, And what shall we do? And he said unto them, Do violence to no man, neither accuse [any] falsely; and be content with your c wages.

(c) Which was paid to them partly in money and partly in food.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Do violence to none — The word signifies to “shake thoroughly,” and so to “intimidate,” probably in order to extort money or other property. (Also see on Matthew 3:10.)

accuse  …  falsely — acting as informers vexatiously, on frivolous or false grounds.

content with your wages — “rations.” We may take this as a warning against mutiny, which the officers attempted to suppress by largesses and donations [Webster and Wilkinson]. And thus the “fruits” which would evidence their repentance were just resistance to the reigning sins, particularly of the class to which the penitent belonged, and the manifestation of an opposite spirit.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-3.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

14. And the soldiers likewise demanded of him, saying, And what shall we do? And he said unto them, Do violence to no man, neither accuse any falsely; and be content with your wages.

[Neither accuse any falsely.] "The manner of sycophants is, first to load a person with reproaches, and whisper some secret, that the other hearing it may, by telling something like it, become obnoxious himself."

[With your wages.] A word used also by the Rabbins: The king distributeth wages to his legions. "The king is not admitted to the intercalation of the year, because of the 'opsonia'": that is, lest he should favour himself in laying out the years with respect to the soldiers' pay.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-3.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

And the soldiers. Whether these were Jews or Romans cannot be ascertained. It is not improbable that, as Judea was a Roman province, they were Jews or Jewish proselytes in the service of Herod Antipas or Philip, and so were really in the Roman service.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-3.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Soldiers also (και στρατευομενοιkai strateuomenoi). Men on service, militantes rather than milites (Plummer). So Paul in 2 Timothy 2:4. An old word like στρατιωτηςstratiōtēs soldier. Some of these soldiers acted as police to help the publicans. But they were often rough and cruel.

Do violence to no man (μηδενα διασεισητεmēdena diaseisēte). Here only in the N.T., but in the lxx and common in ancient Greek. It means to shake (seismic disturbance, earthquake) thoroughly (διαdia) and so thoroughly to terrify, to extort money or property by intimidating (3 Maccabees 7:21). The Latin employs concutere, so. It was a process of blackmail to which Socrates refers (Xenophon, Memorabilia, ii. 9, 1). This was a constant temptation to soldiers. Might does not make right with Jesus.

Neither exact anything wrongfully (μηδε συκοπαντησητεmēde sukophantēsēte). In Athens those whose business it was to inform against any one whom they might find exporting figs out of Attica were called fig-showers or sycophants (συκοπανταιsukophantai). From συκονsukon fig, and παινωphainō show. Some modern scholars reject this explanation since no actual examples of the word meaning merely a fig-shower have been found. But without this view it is all conjectural. From the time of Aristophanes on it was used for any malignant informer or calumniator. These soldiers were tempted to obtain money by informing against the rich, blackmail again. So the word comes to mean to accuse falsely. The sycophants came to be a regular class of informers or slanderers in Athens. Socrates is quoted by Xenophon as actually advising Crito to employ one in self-defence, like the modern way of using one gunman against another. Demosthenes pictures a sycophant as one who “glides about the market like a scorpion, with his venomous sting all ready, spying out whom he may surprise with misfortune and ruin and from whom he can most easily extort money, by threatening him with an action dangerous in its consequences” (quoted by Vincent). The word occurs only in Luke in the N.T., here and in Luke 19:8 in the confession of Zaccheus. It occurs in the lxx and often in the old Greek.

Be content with your wages (αρκειστε τοις οπσωνιοις υμωνarkeisthe tois opsōniois humōn). Discontent with wages was a complaint of mercenary soldiers. This word for wages was originally anything cooked (οπσονopson cooked food), and bought (from ωνεομαιōneomai to buy). Hence, “rations,” “pay,” wages. ΟπσαριονOpsarion diminutive of οπσονopson was anything eaten with bread like broiled fish. So οπσωνιονopsōnion comes to mean whatever is bought to be eaten with bread and then a soldier‘s pay or allowance (Polybius, and other late Greek writers) as in 1 Corinthians 9:7. Paul uses the singular of a preacher‘s pay (2 Corinthians 11:8) and the plural of the wages of sin (Romans 6:23) = death (death is the diet of sin).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Soldiers ( στρατευόμενοι )

Strictly, soldiers on service: hence the participle, serving as soldiers, instead of the more comprehensive term στρατιῶται ,soldiers by profession. Some explain it of soldiers engaged in police inspection in connection with the customs, and hence naturally associated with the publicans.

What shall we do?

The we in the Greek is emphatic, closing the question. Hence Rev., very aptly, and we, what must we do?

Do violence ( διασείσητε )

Only here in New Testament. Lit., to shake violently; hence to agitate or terrify; and so to extort money from one by terrifying him. The corresponding Latin word concutere is used by later writers in the same sense. Xenophon says of Socrates' “I know of his once having heard from Crito that life at Athens was a hard thing for a man who desired to mind his own business. 'For,' said he, 'they bring actions against me, not because they are wronged by me, but because they think I would rather pay money than have any trouble'” (“Memorabilia,” ii., 9,1). For this process of blackmail, σείω , to shake, was used. Thus Aristophanes (“Knights,” 840):

“Thou shalt make much money by falsely accusing and frightening ( σείων τε καῖ ταράττων )again (“Peace,” 639):

“And of their allies they falsely accused ( ἔσειον ) the substantial and rich.”

The word in this passage of Luke has the later, secondary meaning, to extort; and therefore the American Revisers rightly insist on, extort from no man by violence. It is used by medical writers, as, for instance, by Hippocrates, of shaking the palsied or benumbed limbs of a patient; or of a shaking by which the liver was relieved of an obstruction. Luke also uses two other compounds of the verb σείω : κατασείω ,to beckon, Acts 12:17 (peculiar to Luke); and ἀνασέιω , to stir up, which occurs also in Mark 15:11. Both these are also used by medical writers.

Accuse any falsely ( συκοφαντήσητε )

The common explanation of this word is based on the derivation from σῦκον ,a fig, and φαίνω , to make known; hence of informing against persons who exported figs from Attica, contrary to the law, or who plundered sacred fig-trees. As informers were tempted to accuse innocent persons by the reward paid for pointing out violators of the law, the verb acquired the meaning to accuse falsely. Such is the old explanation, which is now rejected by scholars, though the real explanation is merely conjectural. The fig-tree was the pride of Attica, ranking with honey and olives as one of the principal products, and there is no authority for the statement that there was a time when figs were scarce, and required legal protection against export. Neither is it proven that there was a sacred kind of fig. Rettig, in an interesting paper in the “Studten und Kritiken” (1838), explains that, as tribute in Attica was paid in kind as well as in money, and as figs represented a great deal of property, there was a temptation to make false returns of the amount of figs to the assessors; and that thus a class of informers arose who detected and reported these false returns, and received a percentage of the fine which was imposed. These were known asfig shewers. Another writer has suggested that the reference is to one who brings figs to light by shaking the tree; and so, metaphorically, to one who makes rich men yield up the fruits of their labor or rascality by false accusation. Whatever explanation we may accept, it is evident that the word had some original connection with figs, and that it came to mean to slander or accuse falsely. From it comes our word sycophant. The sycophants as a class were encouraged at Athens, and their services were rewarded. Socrates is said by Xenophon to have advised Crito to take a sycophant into his pay, in order to thwart another who was annoying him; and this person, says Xenophon, “quickly discovered on the part of Crito's accusers many illegal acts, and many persons who were enemies to those accusers; one of whom he summoned to a public trial, in which it would be settled what he should suffer or pay, and he would not let him off until he ceased to molest Crito and paid a sum of money besides.” Demosthenes thus describes one: “He glides about the market like a scorpion, with his venomous sting all ready, spying out whom he may surprise with misfortune and ruin, and from whom he can most easily extort money, by threatening him with an action dangerous in its consequences … .It is the bane of our city that it protects and cherishes this poisonous brood, and uses them as informers, so that even the honest man must flatter and court them, in order to be safe from their machinations.” The word occurs only here and Luke 19:8, of Zacchaeus, the publican. The American Revisers hold to the A. V., and render neither accuse any one wrongfully, extortion being described by the previous word. Wyc., neither make ye false challenge. In the Sept. it is used in the sense of to oppress or deceive.

Wages ( ὀψωνίοις )

From ὄψον ,cooked meat, and later, generallyprovisions. At Athens, especially, fish. Compare ὀψάριον ,fish, John 21:9, John 21:10, John 21:13. Hence ὀψώνιον is primarily provision-money, and so used of supplies and pay for an army. With this understanding the use of the word at Romans 6:23, “the wages of sin,” becomes highly suggestive.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

And soldiers also asked him, saying, And we, what must we do1? And he said unto them, Extort from no man by violence2, neither accuse [any one] wrongfully3; and be content with your wages4.

  1. And soldiers also asked him, saying, And we, what must we do? These soldiers were probably Jewish troops in the employ of Herod. Had they been Romans, John would doubtless have told them to worship God.

  2. And he said unto them, Extort from no man by violence. The soldiers, poorly paid, often found it convenient to extort money by intimidation. Strong in their organization, they terrified the weak and enforced gratuities by acts of violence.

  3. Neither accuse [any one] wrongfully. John here condemns the custom of blackmailing the rich by acting as informers and false accusers against them.

  4. And be content with your wages. The term "wages" included rations and money. The soldiers were not to add to their receipts by pillage or extortion. Soldiers' wages were about three cents a day, so they were exposed to strong temptation. Yet John did not bid them abandon their profession, and become ascetics like himself. His teachings was practical. He allowed war as an act of government. Whether Christianity sanctions it or not, is another question.

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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-3.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

14 And the soldiers likewise demanded of him, saying, And what shall we do? And he said unto them, Do violence to no man, neither accuse any falsely; and be content with your wages.

Ver. 14. Do violence to no man] διασεισητε, shake no man by the shoulders, toss no man to and fro to put him into a fright, smite no man with the fist of wickedness. Tamerlane took such order with his soldiers that none were injured by them: if any soldier of his had but taken an apple or the like from any man, he died for it. One of his soldiers having taken a little milk from a country woman, and she thereof complaining, he caused the said soldier to be presently killed, and his stomach to be ripped, where the milk that he had of late drunk being found, he contented the woman, and so sent her away, who had otherwise undoubtedly died for her false accusation, had it not so appeared.

Neither accuse any falsely] Get nothing by sycophancy, (calumnious accusation) ΄ηδε συκοφαντησητε. Oppress no man either by force or fraud, and forged cavillation, as it is rendered, Luke 19:8.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 3:14. And the soldiers likewise It was the custom of the Romans to recruit their armies in the conquered provinces; wherefore, as the Jews did not scruple to engage in a military life, many of them might nowhave been in the emperor's service. Or we may suppose, that after Judea was made a province, the Romans took into their pay the Jewish troops which Herod and his son Archelaus had maintained; for it is certain that the soldiers who now addressed the Baptist were not heathens, otherwise his advice to them would have been, that they should relinquish idolatry, and embrace the worship of the true God. The word rendered do violence, διασεισητε, properly signifies to shake, and sometimes "to take a man by the collar and shake him:" and it seems to have been used proverbially for that violent manner, in which persons in this station of life are often ready to bully those about them, whom they imagine their inferiors in strength and spirit; though nothing is an argument of a meaner spirit, or more unworthy that true courage which constitutes so essential a part of a good military character. The word Συκοφαντειν, which we render to accuse falsely, answers to the Hebrew עשׁךֶ, oshek, and signifies not only to accuse falsely, but to circumvent and oppress. "Do not turn informers and give false evidence against innocent persons, in order that, with the protection of law, you may oppress them, and enrich yourselves with their spoils." He adds, and be content with your wages: "Live quietly on your pay, and do not mutiny, when your officers happen not to bestow on you donations and largesses to conciliate your favour." It seems the Baptist, in his exhortations to penitents who asked his advice, did not follow the example of the Jewish teachers; for he was far from recommending the observation of ceremonies, and the little precepts of man's invention. He attended to the character of the persons; he considered the vices to which they were most addicted; and he strenuouslyenjoined the great duties of justice, charity, moderation, and contentment, according as he found those who applied to him had failed in them; and so by giving Pharisees, Sadducees, publicans, soldiers, and all sorts of persons, instructions adapted to their circumstances and capacities, he prepared them for receiving the Messiah, who he was sure would soon appear, although he did not know the person particularly who was to sustain that high character.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-3.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, what a general resort there was of all sorts of persons to John's ministry; Pharisees, Sadducees, publicans, soldiers; these last here enquire of him what they should do to gain acceptance with God? He answers, Do no violence, defraud no man of his own by false accusation, but be content with the allowance assigned you for your maintenance.

Where it is, 1. Strongly supposed that soldiers are insolent oppressors, making no conscience or injustice, false accusation, and violent oppression.

Yet, 2. The office and employment of a soldier is not condemned, but regulated; he does not bid them cast away their arms, abandon war, appear no more as military men in the field; but manage their employment inoffensively.

Whence we learn, that in some cases, and under some circumstances, for Christians to make war is both lawful and necessary. To make a war lawful, there is required a lawful authority, a righteous cause, an honourable aim and intention, and a just and righteous manner of prosecution, without vanity and ostentation, without cruelty and oppression. Courage and compassion on the one hand, and cowardice and cruelty on the other hand, do frequently accompany one another.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-3.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

14.] στρατευόμενοι—properly, men on march: see Lexx.: but this need not be pressed, only that they were soldiers, serving in an army. Who these were, we have no means of determining. Certainly not soldiers of the army which Herod Antipas sent against Aretas, his father-in-law: see notes on Matthew 14:1 ff.

διασείειν prim., to shake violently. So Plato, τὰς ἶνας εἰς ἀταξίαν διέσεισε, Tim(34) p. 85: also met., to confound, διασείσειν τὰ ἀθηναίων φρονήματα ὥστε μηδίσαι, Herod. vi. 109. The meaning here, to oppress or vex, corresponding to the Lat. concutere, seems to be confined to ecclesiastical use. Macarius, Hom. xliii. p. 139, ed. Migne, has it in this sense: ὥσπερ εἰσὶν οἱ τελῶναι καθεζόμενοι εἰς τὰς στενὰς ὁδούς, καὶ κατέχοντες τοὺς παριόντας καὶ διασείοντες.

συκοφ.] The way in which soldiers would be likely to act the part of informers, would be by laying vexatious charges of disaffection against persons. In assigning a derivation for this verb, notice Liddell and Scott’s remark (after Passow): “The literal signif. is not found in any ancient writer, and is perhaps altogether an invention.”

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-3.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 3:14. στρατευόμενοι] those who were engaged in military service, an idea less extensive than στρατιῶται. See the passages in Wetstein. Historically, it is not to be more precisely defined. See references in regard to Jewish military service in Grotius. According to Michaelis, there were Thracians, Germans, and Galatians in the service of Herod in his war against Aretas; but this war was later, and certainly Jewish soldiers are meant. According to Ewald: soldiers who were chiefly engaged in police inspection, e.g. in connection with the customs.

καὶ ἡμεῖς] we also. They expect an injunction similar ( καί) to that which the publicans received.

διασείειν] to do violence to, is used by later writers of exactions by threats and other kinds of annoyance (to lay under contribution), as concutere. Comp. 3 Maccabees 7:21; see Wetstein, and Schneider, ad Xen. Mem. ii. 9. 1.

συκοφαντεῖν, in its primitive meaning, although no longer occurring in this sense, is to be a fig-shower. According to the usual view (yet see in general, Ast, ad Plat. Rep. p. 362; Westermann, ad Plut. Sol. 24), it was applied to one who denounced for punishment those who transgressed the prohibition of the export of figs from Attica. According to the actual usage, it means to denounce falsely, to traduce, and, as in this place, to be guilty of chicane. It is often thus used also in the Greek writers. See Rettig in the Stud. u. Krit. 1838, p. 775 ff.; Becker, Char. I. p. 289 ff. πονηρὸν, πονηρὸν συκοφάντης ἀεὶ καὶ βάσκανον, Dem. 307. 23; Herbst, ad Xen. Symp. iv. 30, p. 79 f.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-3.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 3:14. στρατευόμενοι) Those serving as soldiers; we come to these after the publicans in successive gradation.— μηδένα διασείσητε) shake no one violently [Do violence to no man].— μηδὲ συκοφαντήσητε) with calumnies, as though proceeding by right of law: Genesis 43:18 [LXX. εἰσαγόμεθα τοῦ συκοφαντήσαι ἡμᾶς, “we are brought in that he may falsely accuse us.” Hebr. “that he may roll himself upon us.” Engl. “that he may seek occasion against us.”]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

A good and faithful minister of Christ should be one able to bring out of his storehouse things new and old, to give every one their portion in their season, and so courageous and faithful as not to be afraid to do it, nor for any reason decline the doing of it. Such was John the Baptist. These were the Roman soldiers, kept by them to maintain their conquest of Judea. Some of these also come to hear John the Baptist preach: hearing him press repentance, and bringing forth fruits that might testify the truth of it, they ask what they should do. John saith to them,

Do violence to no man, &c. Experience hath taught all people, that soldiers (especially employed to keep garrisons amongst a conquered people) are often very insolent, and for their own gain prone to accuse innocent persons, and the jealousy of conquerors often allows them too easy an ear; as also how apt they are by oppression to mend their short commons, or to exact upon others that they may spend luxuriously. All these are acts or species of injustice, which the Baptist lets them know must be left, if they would bring forth fruits fit for repentance. He doth not blame the employment of a soldier, but only regulates their behaviour in that employment. Wars in just causes are undoubtedly lawful under the gospel, and consequently so is the employment of a soldier; we read of several good centurions or captains of hundreds. But the soldier stands highly concerned to look:

1. That the cause be good in which he draweth his sword.

2. That he behaveth himself in it lawfully, not using any needless violence, not accusing any wrongfully, not endeavouring to mend his pay by any, rapine, or unjustly taking away what is another’s, either to spend in luxury, or to uphold himself in his station.

From this instruction of John the Baptist, we may learn several things concerning the nature of repentance.

1. That where there is a true root of repentance, it will bring forth fruits worthy of it.

2. That acts of mercy and justice are true and proper fruits of a true repentance, without which there can be nothing of it in truth.

3. That true repentance is best discovered by our abhorrence of and declining such sinful courses as we have formerly been addicted to, and have daily temptations to from the circumstances of our lives, and those callings, and places, and courses of life wherein the providence of God had fixed us.

4. That these things, repentance and faith, are such proper effects of both, as discover the truth of those gracious habits in the soul, and without which there can be no true evidence of them.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 3:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-3.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

воины Несомненно, это были представители оккупационной римской армии, которых ненавидел иудейский народ за их жестокость и язычество. Возможно, этим отдельным воинам было поручено оказывать содействие мытарям (ст. 12). То обстоятельство, что на проповедь Иоанна откликнулись такие люди, показывает могущественное влияние, которое имело его служение, и особенно на отверженных обществом (ср. Мф. 21:31, 32).

никого не обижайте Здесь и в ст. 13 Иоанн требовал честности и благородства в практических вопросах повседневной жизни, а не монашеского образа жизни или фанатичного аскетизма. Ср. Иак. 1:27.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-3.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And soldiers also asked him, saying, “And we, what must we do?” And he said to them, “Extort from no man by violence, nor accuse any one wrongfully, and be content with your wages.” ’

We are probably intended to see the ‘soldiers’ as covering all types of soldier in Palestine. The soldiers may have included auxiliaries in the local legions recruited from non-Jews in the area, who were often interested in Judaism with its ancient books and wisdom, and were especially interested in this new prophet who had arisen, or they may have been Jewish soldiers of Herod Antipas. We must also not discount the possibility of Romans soldiers, remembering the interest of the Centurion in Luke 7:1-10 and Cornelius in Judaism and the Gospel, for those are the only soldiers we are ever told of who responded to the word. These soldiers would thus indicate to Luke’s readers the fact that Gentiles were not turned away by John. Whoever they were they asked what they should do, and they were told that they must treat people fairly and honestly, not try to use their position to extort money from them or falsely accuse them, and be content with the wages that they received for their jobs. This does not mean that they were never to ask for a rise. It meant that they must not use their jobs to supplement their wages dishonestly.

It is noteworthy that they were not told to cease being soldiers. It was recognised that in a sinful world soldiers (and in our day police) are necessary. What matters is that they should be soldiers who are genuinely righteous so as always to act with honour, and only to act where really necessary. That world was certainly in need of Christian soldiers, and still is.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-3.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

14.Soldiers—The word soldiers here is a participle, signifying those who were in actual performance of war duties, and hence it has been supposed that the soldiers specified were those engaged in the war of Herod against Aretas. See note on Matthew 14:1. But the participle perhaps is used because war was so frequent that the soldier was always considered as warring.

Do violence to no man—John does not forbid the forcible execution of military duties as ordered by the government, but that illegal violence which transforms the soldier into a private ruffian.

Content with your wages—Without adding pillage thereto. And this very injunction implies their continuance in the military service for which the wages were received. That is, war, as an act of government, is allowed by the divine law.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-3.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Soldiers were able because of their position to threaten people with reprisal to extort money from them. Exactly who these soldiers were is unclear, but it is also unimportant. Greed appears to have been a special temptation for them since the wages of soldiers were low. Therefore John called on them to demonstrate contentment.

Luke 3:12-14 help us see that certain temptations are more prominent in certain occupations than others. However material possessions were a source of temptation to all these people, as they still are today.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-3.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 3:14. Soldiers. Some soldiers. The original refers to those in actual service at the time. They may have had police duty to perform. That they were foreign mercenaries employed by Herod is less likely, since the inference is that they were either Jews or men like Cornelius (Acts 10).

Do violence to no one. The verb first means ‘to shake violently,’ then to oppress, vex, lay under contribution, etc.

Neither accuse any wrongfully. Lit., neither be sycophants, i.e., play the spy, be informers, slander, etc. For such conduct military service, in those days, afforded great opportunity.

Be content with your wages. Mutinies on account of pay were frequent, especially among the soldiers of dependent kings. John did not say: Throw away your arms and desert your colors; but: Do not abuse your power. His exhortation plainly implies the lawfulness of the military profession, and consequently the right of war under certain circumstances. John understood his audience, yet he had been a recluse. Knowledge of human nature is essential for the preacher; but a careful study of God’s Word in retirement may be a better means of obtaining it than constant intercourse with the world.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-3.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 3:14. , “soldiers on service”. R. V[40] margin. So also Farrar. But Field disputes this rendering. “The advice seems rather to point to soldiers at home, mixing among their fellow-citizens, than to those who were on the march in an enemy’s country” (Ot. Nor.). Schürer, whom J. Weiss follows, thinks they would be heathen.— : the verb (here only) means literally to shake much, here = to extort money by intimidation = concertio in law Latin. This military vice would be practised on the poor.— : literally to inform on those who exported figs from Athens; here = to obtain money by acting as informers (against the rich).— ( , ): a late Greek word, primarily anything eaten with bread, specially fish, “kitchen”; salary paid in kind; then generally wages. VideRomans 6:23, where the idea is, the “kitchen,” the best thing sin has to give is death.

[40] Revised Version.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-3.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Baptist knew that such as engage in war, are not murderers, but ministers of the law; not avengers of injuries, but defenders of the public weal. Had he thought otherwise, he would have said: "cast away your arms, abandon the service, never strike, maim, or destroy any one:" these are not the things which are blameable in the military, but their cruelty, their revenge, their implacable dispositions, and lust of power. (St. Augustine, lib. 22. cont. Faust.)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the soldiers = some soldiers (no Art.) going on service. Not the Noun, but the Participle = men under arms. Josephus (Antiquities xviii 5

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-3.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) And the soldiers likewise . . .—The Greek word has not the definite article, and is a participle. Better, and soldiers, as they were marching. The words probably point to the troops of Antipas on their way down the valley of the Jordan to attack Aretas (comp. Notes on 2 Corinthians 11:32), the father of the Tetrarch’s divorced wife, who had declared war on account of the wrong thus done to his daughter. Roman soldiers were not likely to have come to the Baptist’s preaching.

Do violence to no man.—The Greek word was the exact equivalent of the Latin concutere (whence our “concussion”), and was applied to the violence which was used by irregular troops to extort money or provisions.

Neither accuse any falsely.—The word occurs again in the confession of Zacchæus (Luke 19:8). It is supposed to have been primarily used of those who informed against the export of figs from Attica at a time when that trade was prohibited. They were known, it is said, as “sycophants,” though no actual instance of this use of the word is extant. The word came, in course of time, to be applied to informers generally, and then, in its modern sense, to those who court the favour of princes by informing against others—the delatores, who at this time were so conspicuous in the imperial court, on which that of the Tetrarch’s had been modelled.

Be content with your wages.—Better, pay. The word meant primarily the “rations” of a soldier, and then the money received in lieu of rations. As used in the New Testament, the idea of pay for soldier’s work as distinct from the wages of a labourer, is almost always connected with it. (Comp. Romans 6:23; 1 Corinthians 9:7.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the soldiers likewise demanded of him, saying, And what shall we do? And he said unto them, Do violence to no man, neither accuse any falsely; and be content with your wages.
the soldiers
Matthew 8:5; Acts 10:7
Do violence to no man
or, Put no man in fear.
Romans 13:9,10; Philippians 2:15
accuse
19:8; Exodus 20:16; 23:1; Leviticus 19:11; Titus 2:3; Revelation 12:10
and be
Philippians 4:11; 1 Timothy 6:8-10; Hebrews 13:5,6
wages
or, allowance.
Reciprocal: Exodus 20:15 - GeneralExodus 23:7 - far from;  Leviticus 25:14 - GeneralDeuteronomy 23:9 - GeneralDeuteronomy 24:17 - pervert;  1 Samuel 25:7 - we hurt;  Nehemiah 5:10 - I likewise;  Ezekiel 45:9 - remove;  1 Timothy 6:6 - contentment

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-3.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

14. Some soldiers also asked him. These were probably Jews or Gentiles converted to Judaism who were part of the Roman army.

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 3:14". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.