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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 5:17

One day He was teaching; and there were some Pharisees and teachers of the law sitting there, who had come from every village of Galilee and Judea and from Jerusalem; and the power of the Lord was present for Him to perform healing.

Adam Clarke Commentary

On a certain day - This was when he was at Capernaum. See Mark 2:1.

The power of the Lord - Δυναμις Κυριου The mighty or miraculous power of the Lord, i.e. of Jesus, was there to heal them - as many as were diseased either in body or soul. Where the teaching of Christ is, there also is the power of Christ to redeem and save.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-5.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And it came to pass on one of those days, that he was teaching; and there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, who were come out of every village of Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem: and the power of the Lord was with him to heal.

Here is a glimpse of the astounding effect the words and works of Jesus had already produced. The religious hierarchy were by this time fully alerted to the challenge of Jesus' life and teaching; and their hostility made itself evident at every opportunity. Nevertheless, the mighty works of Jesus continued unabated.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-5.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And it came to pass on a certain day,.... When he was at Capernaum, as appears from Mark 2:1

As he was teaching: in the house where such numbers were gathered together, to hear the word of God preached by him, that there was not room for them, neither within the house, nor about the door, Mark 2:2

That there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by; who were sometimes called Scribes, and sometimes lawyers, and were generally of the sect of the Pharisees:

which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judea, and Jerusalem: having heard much of his doctrine and miracles, they came from all parts to watch and observe him, and to take all opportunities and advantages against him, that they might expose him to the people:

and the power of the Lord was present to heal them; not the Pharisees and doctors of the law, who did not come to be healed by him, either in body or mind; but the multitude, some of whom came to hear his doctrine, and others to be healed of their infirmities, Luke 5:15. The Persic version reads the words thus, "and from all the villages of Galilee, and from Judea, and from Jerusalem, multitudes came, and the power of God was present to heal them."


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

4 And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judaea, and Jerusalem: and the power of the Lord c was [present] to heal them.

(4) Christ, in healing him that was sick from paralysis, shows the cause of all diseases, and the remedy.

(c) The mighty power of Christ's Godhead showed itself in him at that time.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 5:17-26. Paralytic healed.

(See on Matthew 9:1-8).

Pharisees and doctors … sitting by — the highest testimony yet borne to our Lord‘s growing influence, and the necessity increasingly felt by the ecclesiastics throughout the country of coming to some definite judgment regarding Him.

power of the Lord … present — with Jesus.

to heal them — the sick people.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-5.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

17. And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judaea, and Jerusalem: and the power of the Lord was present to heal them.

[On a certain day.] In Talmudic writing it is on a certain time.


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Bibliography
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-5.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

That (καιkai). Use of καιkai = οτιhoti (that) like the Hebrew αυτοςwav though found in Greek also.

He (αυτοςautos). Luke sometimes has ην διδασκωνautos in the nominative as unemphatic “he” as here, not “he himself.”

Was teaching (ησαν κατημενοιēn didaskōn). Periphrastic imperfect again like our English idiom.

Were sitting by (νομοδιδασκαλοιēsan kathēmenoi). Periphrastic imperfect again. There is no “by” in the Greek.

Doctors of the law (ιεροδιδασκαλοςnomodidaskaloi). A compound word formed after analogy of γραμματειςhierodidaskalos but not found outside of the N.T. and ecclesiastical writers, one of the very few words apparently N.T. in usage. It appears here and Acts 5:34; 1 Timothy 1:7. It is not likely that Luke and Paul made the word, but they simply used the term already in current use to describe teachers and interpreters of the law. Our word “doctor” is Latin for “teacher.” These “teachers of the law” are called elsewhere in the Gospels “scribes” (νομικοςgrammateis) as in Matthew and Mark (See note on Matthew 5:20; Matthew 23:34) and Luke 5:21; Luke 19:47; Luke 21:1; Luke 22:2. Luke also employs νομοςnomikos (one skilled in the law, οι γραμματεις και οι Παρισαιοιnomos) as in Luke 10:25. One thinks of our LL.D. (Doctors of Civil and Canon Law), for both were combined in Jewish law. They were usually Pharisees (mentioned here for the first time in Luke) for which see note on Matthew 3:7, note on Matthew 5:20. Luke will often speak of the Pharisees hereafter. Not all the “Pharisees” were “teachers of the law” so that both terms often occur together as in Luke 5:21 where Luke has separate articles (οι ησαν εληλυτοτεςhoi grammateis kai hoi Pharisaioi), distinguishing between them, though one article may occur as in Matthew 5:20 or no article as here in Matthew 5:17. Luke alone mentions the presence here of these Pharisees and doctors of the law “which were come” (εκ πασης κωμης της Γαλιλαιας και Ιουδαιας και Ιερουσαλημhoi ēsan elēluthotes periphrastic past perfect active, had come).

Out of every village of Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem (δυναμις Κυριου ην εις το ιασται αυτονek pasēs kōmēs tēs Galilaias kai Ioudaias kai Ierousalēm). Edersheim (Jewish Social Life) observes that the Jews distinguished Jerusalem as a separate district in Judea. Plummer considers it hyperbole in Luke to use “every village.” But one must recall that Jesus had already made one tour of Galilee which stirred the Pharisees and rabbis to active opposition. Judea had already been aroused and Jerusalem was the headquarters of the definite campaign now organized against Jesus. One must bear in mind that John 4:1-4 shows that Jesus had already left Jerusalem and Judea because of the jealousy of the Pharisees. They are here on purpose to find fault and to make charges against Jesus. One must not forget that there were many kinds of Pharisees and that not all of them were as bad as these legalistic and punctilious hypocrites who deserved the indictment and exposure of Christ in Matthew 23. Paul himself is a specimen of the finer type of Pharisee which, however, developed into the persecuting fanatic till Jesus changed his whole life.

The power of the Lord was with him to heal (Κυριουdunamis Kuriou ēn eis to iāsthai auton). So the best texts. It is neat Greek, but awkward English: “Then was the power of the Lord for the healing as to him (Jesus).” Here δυναμειςKuriou refers to Jehovah.

Dunamis (dynamite) is one of the common words for “miracles” (dunameis). What Luke means is that Jesus had the power of the Lord God to heal with. He does not mean that this power was intermittent. He simply calls attention to its presence with Jesus on this occasion.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-5.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

He was teaching

The pronoun has a slightly emphatic force: he as distinguished from the Pharisees and teachers of the law.

Doctors of the law ( νομοδιδάσκαλοι )

Only in Luke and 1 Timothy 1:7. Luke often uses νομικὸς , conversant with the law, but in the other word the element of teaching is emphasized, probably in intentional contrast with Christ's teaching.

Judaea and Jerusalem

The Rabbinical writers divided Judaea proper into three parts - mountain, sea-shore, and valley - Jerusalem being regarded as a separate district. “Only one intimately acquainted with the state of matters at the time, would, with the Rabbis, have distinguished Jerusalem as a district separate from all the rest of Judaea, as Luke markedly does on several occasions (Acts 1:8; Acts 10:39)” (Edersheim, “Jew ish Social Life”).

Was present to heal them

The A. V. follows the reading, αὐτούς , them; i.e., the sufferers who were present, referring back to Luke 5:15. The best texts, however, read αὐτόν , him, referring to Christ, and meaning was present that he should heal; i.e., in aid of his healing. So Rev.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-5.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judaea, and Jerusalem: and the power of the Lord was present to heal them.

Sitting by — As being more honourable than the bulk of the congregation, who stood.

And the power of the Lord was present to heal them — To heal the sickness of their souls, as well as all bodily diseases.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-5.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And it came to pass on one of those days, that he was teaching1; and there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by2, who were come out of every village of Galilee and Judaea and Jerusalem3: and the power of the Lord was with him to heal4.
    JESUS HEALS A PARALYTIC AT CAPERNAUM. Matthew 9:2-8; Mark 2:1-12; Luke 5:17-26

  1. And it came to pass on one of those days, that he was teaching. See Luke 5:17-26.

  2. And there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by. The fact that they were sitting, shows that they were honored above the rest; Jesus did not increase their ill-will by any needless disrespect.

  3. Who were come out of every village of Galilee and Judaea and Jerusalem. It is not likely that such a gathering came together by accident. Capernaum was known to be the headquarters of Jesus, and these leaders of the people had doubtless gathered there to wait for some opportunity to see or hear Jesus. They recognized the necessity of coming to some definite judgment regarding him. We shall see in this scene the beginning of their hostility to Jesus, which developed into four objections: (1) alleged blasphemy; (2) intercourse with publicans and sinners; (3) supposed neglect of ascetic duties, such as washings, fastings, etc.; (4) alleged violation of the sabbath.

  4. And the power of the Lord was with him to heal. That is to say, the power of God the Father was then working in Jesus to perform miracles (John 14:10). Some take this as implying that other miracles had been wrought that day, before the arrival of the paralytic. But the words are more likely a preface for what follows; in which case the meaning is that the cold disbelief of the Pharisees did not prevent Jesus from working miracles, as disbelief usually did (Matthew 13:58; Matthew 16:1-4).


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-5.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Out of every town, &c.; that is, from many towns,--from all parts of the country.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-5.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

17 And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judaea, and Jerusalem: and the power of the Lord was present to heal them.

Ver. 17. And the power of the Lord] So it is, when any ordinance is afoot.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 5:17. And the power of the Lord was present, &c.— Our Lord not only preached such awakening sermons as might have converted them to righteousness, but he was ready to perform such astonishing miracles as ought to have removed all their scruples with respect to his mission. Some suppose, that the word them refers not to the doctors and Pharisees of the law, but, in general, to those who had need of healing, and faith to be healed—the crowds, mentioned Mark 2:2. See on Matthew 9:1.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-5.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

As the great end of our Saviour's miracles was to confirm his doctrine, so commonly after his preaching he wrought his miracles. The scribes and Pharisees, though they had no love for our Saviour's person, nor value for his ministry, yet they frequently accompanied him wherever he went, partly to cavil at his doctrine, and partly out of curiousity to see his miracles: but observe the gracious condescension of our Saviour; although he well knew that the Pharisees at this time attended upon him with no good intention, yet he puts forth his divine power in working miracles before them: The power of the Lord was present to heal. Not that Christ's power was at any time absent but it is said now to be present, because it was now exerted and put forth at his will and pleasure.

And accordingly at this time, before the Pharisee's eyes, he miraculously cures a person sick of the palsy, as the paragraph before us does inform us.

Wherein observe, 1. The diseased and distressed person, one sick of the palsy, which being a resolution and weakness of the nerves, enfeebles the joints, and confines a person to his bed or couch. As a demonstration of Christ's divine power, he was pleased to single out the palsy and leprosy, incurable diseases, to work a cure upon. Now this person was so great a cripple, by reason of the palsy, that he could not go, nor be led, but was carried in his bed or couch.

Observe, 2. As the grievousness of the disease, so the greatness of the people's faith. The man and his friends had a firm and full persuasion, that Christ was clothed with a divine power, and able to help him; and they hope in his goodness, that he was willing as well as able.

And accordingly, the roof of the Jewish houses being flat, they uncover some part of it, and let the bed down with the sick man in it, and lay him at the foot of Christ, in hopes of help and healing.

Observe, 3. That no sooner did they exercise their faith in believing, but Christ exerts his divine power in healing: yet the object of their faith probably was not Christ's divine power as God, but they looked upon him as an extraordinary prophet, to whom God had communicated such a divine power as Elijah and Elisha had before him. Yet, see the marvelous efficacy even of this faith, which obtained not only what was desired, but more than was expected. They desired only the healing of the body, but Christ heals body and soul too, saying, Son, be of good cheer, thy sins are forgiven thee. Thereby our Saviour, signifies to them, that sin is the meritorious cause of sickness, and consequently, that in sickness the best way to find ease and deliverance from pain, is first to seek for pardon; for the sins of pardon will in some degree take away the sense of pain.

Observe, 4. The exception which the Pharisees take against our Saviour for pronouncing that this man's sins were forgiven him: they charge him with blasphemy, urging, that it is God's peculiar prerogative to pardon sin. Indeed their proposition was true, but their application was false. Nothing more true, than that it is the highest blasphemy for any mere man to arrogate and assume to himself the incommunicable property of God, absolutely and authoritatively to forgive sin. But then their denying this power to Christ of forgiving sins, which he had as God from all eternity, and as mediator, God and man in one person, when here on earth; this was blasphemy in them; but the assuming and challenging in it, none in him.

Observe, 5. To cure, if possible, the obstinacy and blindness of the Pharisees, our Saviour gives them a two fold demonstration of his Godhead;

1. By letting them understand that he knew their thoughts, Jesus perceived their thoughts, Luke 5:22 To know the thoughts, to search the hearts, and understand the reasonings of men, is not in the power of angels or men, but the prerogative of God only.

2. By assuming to himself a power to forgive sins: for our Saviour here, by taking upon him to forgive sins in his own name and by his own authority, does give the world an undeniable proof, and a convincing evidence, of his Godhead: for who can forgive sins but God only?

Observe, 6. The effect which this miracle had upon the minds of the people: they marvelled and were amazed, were filled with fear, but not with faith; astonished, but did not believe.

Learn hence, that the sight of Christ's own miracles is not sufficient to work faith in the soul, without the efficacious grace of God; the one may make us marvel, the other must make us believe.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-5.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

17.] ἐκ π. κώμ. not to be pressed: as we say, from all parts.

δύν. κυρ.] Does this mean the power of God—or the power of the Lord, i.e. Jesus? Me(49). remarks that Luke uses κύριος frequently for Jesus, but always with the article: see ch. Luke 7:13; Luke 10:1; Luke 11:39; Luke 12:42, alli(50). fr.:—but the same word, without the article, for the Most High; see ch. Luke 1:11; Luke 1:38; Luke 1:58; Luke 1:66; Luke 2:9; Luke 4:19; whence we conclude that the meaning is, the power of God (working in the Lord Jesus) was in the direction of His healing: i.e. wrought so that He exercised the powers of healing: and then a case follows. For construction, see reff.

αὐτόν has apparently been altered to αὐτούς from its difficulty. It might indeed be said that - ους may have been altered to - ον from the apparent difficulty of all these mentioned needing healing. So uncertain are merely subjective considerations either way: and so necessary is it to adhere in such cases, where any uncertainty exists, simply and faithfully to antiquity, as our best existing guide.


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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-5.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 5:17. καθημένοι, sitting) as hearers that were treated with more especial honour than the rest.— νομοδιδάσκαλοι, doctors of the law) Scribes, Luke 5:21.— κώμης, village) The extremes, Jerusalem on the one hand, and the villages on the opposite, are specified: the towns which constitute the immediate mean between the capital city and the petty villages, are meant to be included.— ἦν) was present so as to heal. A similar expression occurs in the LXX., ἐσόμεθα τοῦ σῶσαί σε, we shall be present, or ready, for the purpose of saving thee, 2 Samuel 10:11; ἔσονται ὥστε ἐργάζεσθαι, they shall be present to perform, Numbers 8:11; γενέσθω χείρ σου τοῦ σῶσαί με, let Thy hand be present for the purpose of saving me, Psalms 119:173.— αὐτοὺς, them) namely, those of whom Luke 5:15 speaks.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-5.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

We shall observe that the scribes and Pharisees much haunted our Saviour wherever he came, either to cavil at him, or out of curiosity to see the miracles he wrought. It seems they were many of them present at this time. But here ariseth a question or two.

1. How is it said, the power of the Lord was present with Christ to heal? had not Christ this power of healing then at all times?

Answer: Doubtless he had, for he was always the Lord that healeth us. The Divine nature once united to the human was never separated from Christ, but it did not always put forth itself, being as to that directed by his will. But as the end of Christ’s miracles was for the confirmation of his doctrine; so we shall observe, that mostly after preaching he wrought his miraculous operations.

2. Who are here meant by them? by reading the words one would think them related to the Pharisees and doctors of the law, of none of which we read that they were sick, nor do we read of any cures that Christ made upon them.

Answer: We must know that sometimes in holy writ these relative terms are put out of due order, as in Matthew 11:1, where we have these words, And it came to pass, when Jesus had made an end of commanding his twelve disciples, he departed thence to teach and to preach in their cities: not in the disciples’ cities; poor men, they had no cities; but in the Jewish cities, the cities of that country: yet the verse mentions no other persons than Jesus and the twelve disciples.

So here, though the verse mentions no other persons present than the Pharisees and doctors of the law, yet there doubtless were many others, and some amongst them labouring under chronical distempers; of these the text is to be understood.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 5:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-5.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

17. ἐν μιᾷ τῶν ἡμερῶν. ‘On one of those days.’ The vagueness of the phrase shews that no stress is here laid on chronological order. In Matthew 9:2-8; Mark 2:3-12 the scene is a house in Capernaum, and the time (apparently) after the healing of the Gadarene demoniac on the eastern side of the Lake, and on the day of Matthew’s feast.

καὶ αὐτὸς ἦν διδάσκων. Lit. ‘It came to pass … and He was teaching and there were.’ St Luke is fond of this paratactic arrangement of sentences by means of and. He uses καὶ most frequently in his Gospel, and τε in the Acts. Comp. Luke 7:37. Jesus was not teaching in a synagogue, but probably in Peter’s house. Notice the “He” which is so frequent in St Luke, and marks the later epoch when the title “the Christ” had passed into a name, and when “He” could have but one meaning. See on Luke 4:15.

Φαρισαῖοι καὶ νομοδιδάσκαλοι. The word νομοδιδάσκαλος means the same as νομικὸς in Luke 7:30 &c. See Excursus on the Jewish Sects.

καὶ Ἰουδαίας καὶ Ἱερουσαλήμ. These had probably come out of simple curiosity to hear and see the great Prophet of Nazareth. They were not the spies malignantly sent at the later and sadder epoch of His ministry (Matthew 15:1; Mark 3:2; Mark 7:1) to dog His footsteps, and lie in wait to catch any word on which they could build an accusation.

κυρίου, ‘of Jehovah.’ If Christ were meant the article would be used.

ἦν. The word is here emphatic—‘was present,’ praesto erat. It is probably due to an Aramaic original. It is remarkable that in Mark 2:1-11 the same story is told in widely different phraseology.

εἰς τὸ ἰᾶσθαι αὐτόν. This is the reading of א BL. If the reading be correct the verse means “the Power of the Lord (i.e. of the Almighty Jehovah) was with Him to heal.” If αὐτοὺς be read it refers to the sick among the multitude.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-5.html. 1896.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And it came about on one of those days, that he was teaching, and there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, who were come out of every village of Galilee and Judaea and Jerusalem, and the power of the Lord was with him to heal.’

After a vague time note, omitting the mention of Capernaum (which demonstrates that he is not over concerned to mention place names, not that he does not know them), Luke now introduces us to Jesus as He teaches. From what follows He was clearly seated within a house looking out through the open door. Like being in the boat earlier it would prevent the crowds from pressing Him. Nearby, observing Him, were Pharisees and Doctors of the Law (Rabbis). They had come as self-appointed judges to check Him out, ‘from every village of Galilee, and Judaea and Jerusalem’. This did not necessarily mean that every village in Galilee contained at least one Pharisee, but that all villages that did have Pharisees in them were represented. They had clearly decided that it was important for them all to be here. Some also came from Judaea and Jerusalem. (This is the most likely reading and best attested. Other readings suggest that it is the crowds who were from out of ‘every village of Galilee, and from Judaea and from Jerusalem’). By now His fame had spread far and wide and even Judaea and Jerusalem were interested.

‘And the power of the Lord was with Him to heal.’ This suggests that a number of healings had already taken place. But it would be specially relevant in what was to follow, for Jesus would use this power to heal as proof of His overall authority.


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-5.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Again Luke stressed the priority of Jesus" teaching ministry. The Pharisees and scribes had come to hear what He was teaching. These men, first appearing in Luke here, were the guardians of Israel"s orthodoxy. The Pharisees were a political party in Israel noted for their strict observance of the Mosaic Law as traditionally interpreted by the rabbis. Some of these doctors of the law (i.e, scribes, lawyers) were probably Pharisees, but probably not all of them were. The figure is a hendiadys indicating that they were religious watchdogs and does not mean that other religious leaders were absent. A hendiadys is a figure of speech in which someone expresses a complex idea by naming two entities and linking them with a conjunction. Thus scribes and Pharisees means religious leaders but does not imply that other religious leaders such as the Sadducees were absent. [Note: For a discussion of the religious leaders, see Steve Mason, "Chief Priests, Sadducees, Pharisees and Sanhedrin in Acts ," in The Book of Acts in Its First Century Setting; Vol4: The Book of Acts in Its Palestinian Setting, pp134-47.]

Luke viewed the power of God as extrinsic to Jesus (cf. John 5:1-19). Jesus did not perform miracles out of His divine nature. He laid those powers aside at the Incarnation. Rather He did His miracles in the power of God"s Spirit who was on Him and in Him as a prophet.

"Why would Luke say that "the power of the Lord was present for him to heal" if Jesus could heal at any time, under any condition, and solely at his own discretion? This statement only makes sense if we view healing as the sovereign prerogative of God the Father, who sometimes dispenses his power to heal and at other times withholds it." [Note: Jack Deere, Surprised by the Power of the Spirit, p59. Cf. J. I. Packer, "The Comfort of Conservatism," in Power Religion, p289.]

In Acts , Luke would stress that the same Spirit is on and in every believer today, and He is the source of our power as He was the source of Jesus" power.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-5.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 5:17. On one of those days. Probably referring, but very indefinitely, to the preaching tour of chap. Luke 4:44.—Pharisees and teachers of the law. Peculiar to Luke; but the other Evangelists speak of the ‘scribes’ as objecting.

Out of every Village, etc. From all parts, not necessarily from each and every village.

Jerusalem. Probably they had come with hostile purpose, since on this occasion we first discover an indication of antagonism.

And the power of the Lord was with him to heal. Some authorities read: ‘that he should heal them.’ ‘Lord’ refers to God, although Luke often applies the term to our Lord.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-5.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 5:17. ἐν μιᾷ τῶν ἡμερῶν, a phrase as vague as a note of time as that in Luke 5:12 as a note of place.— καὶ αὐτὸς, etc., and He was teaching; the Hebraistic paratactic construction so common in Lk. Note καὶ ἦσαν and καὶ δύναμις κ. ἦν following.— νομοδιδάσκαλοι, teachers of the law, Lk.’s equivalent for γραμματεῖς. The Pharisees and lawyers appear here for the first time in Lk., and they appear in force—a large gathering from every village of Galilee, from Judaea, and from Jerusalem. Jesus had preached in the synagogues of Galilee where the scribes might have an opportunity of hearing Him. But this extensive gathering of these classes at this time is not accounted for fully in Lk. Not till later does such a gathering occur in Mk. (Mark 3:22).— αὐτόν, the reading in (48) (49) (50) gives quite a good sense; it is accusative before ἰᾶσθαι = the power of the Lord (God) was present to the effect or intent that He (Jesus) should heal.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-5.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

the fame of Jesus had spread far and wide. It was for this reason that it is here said, the Pharisees and doctors of the law came out of every town in Galilee, &c. not indeed through any intention of becoming his disciples, but through a spirit of envy; as they now saw every one leaving them, and following our Saviour. Perhaps also to calumniate him, as we often find them to have done, when they beheld him making converts from them. (Denis the Carthusian)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-5.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

on = in. Greek. en. App-104. See the Structure "S" and "S".

a certain day = in one of the days.

that = and.

doctors, &c. = teachers of the law. Greek. nomodida skalos. Occurs only here, Acts 5:34, and 1 Timothy 1:7.

Galilee, . . . Judaea, . . . Jerusalem. Palestine was divided into the three districts (mountain, seashore and valley). Compare Acts 1:8; Acts 10:39

the LORD = Jehovah. App-98.

to = for, or with a view to. Greek. eis. App-104.

them. TTrm. A WH R. read "him" instead of "them". If so, then the clause reads, "the power of Jehovah: was [present] for Him to heal", but miracles were few "because of their unbelief", Matthew 13:58.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-5.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judaea, and Jerusalem: and the power of the Lord was present to heal them.
that there
21,30; 7:30; 11:52-54; 15:2; John 3:21
Jerusalem
Matthew 15:1; Mark 3:22; 7:1
power
6:19; 8:46; Matthew 11:5; Mark 16:18; Acts 4:30; 19:11

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 5:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-5.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Wednesday, November 13th, 2019
the Week of Proper 27 / Ordinary 32
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