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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Mark 1:14

Now after John had been taken into custody, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of God,

Adam Clarke Commentary

Preaching the Gospel of the kingdom - See the notes on Matthew 3:2; and on the office of the preacher, or herald, at the end of that chapter.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/mark-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Now after that John was put in prison - John was imprisoned by Herod, Matthew 14:3.

Jesus came into Galilee - He left Judea and went into the more retired country of Galilee. He supposed that if he remained in Judea, Herod would also persecute him and attempt to take his life. His time of death had not come, and he therefore prudently sought safety in retirement. Hence, we may learn that when we have great duties to perform for the church of God, we are not to endanger our lives wantonly. When we can secure them without a sacrifice of principle, we are to do it. See Matthew 24:16.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/mark-1.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Mark 1:14

Now after that John was put in prison.

Hindrances no injury

But John had been doing a good work, doing an important work, doing the very work that God had planned for him to do. Why did the Lord let him be put in prison? Just such interruptions as that to the best men’s work, and just such trials as this to the best of men, are in the Lord’s plan of the progress of his work, and of the training of His people. When old Father Mills, of Torringford, Connecticut, heard that his son, Samuel J. Mills, “the father of foreign missions in America,” had died at sea while his work was at its brilliant starting, the quaint old Yankee preacher said wonderingly: “Well, I declare! The fat’s all in the fire again.” And it did look that way, didn’t it? We can’t understand all this; but we can see its commonness. John the Baptist was a child of promise and a child of prophecy. Jesus says of him: “Among them that are born of women there hath not arisen a greater than John the Baptist.” Yet just as he was fairly inaugurating the Messiah’s dispensation, and his work seemed more important than almost anyone’s else on earth, “John was put in prison.” Until you can see just why that thing was permitted, don’t worry yourself over some of your little hindrances, or those of your neighbours, asking-as if half in doubt whether or not there is a God, or whether He cares for the interests of His cause and its best friends “What did the Lord let this happen for?” (Sunday School Times.)

The silencing of Christ’s ministers not the suppressing of Christ’s gospel

Out of the ashes of a Faithful God raises up a Hopeful; for the immortal dreamer says: “Now I saw in my dream that Christian went not forth alone; for there was one whose name was Hopeful who joined himself unto him.” Though the enemy burn a John Huss, God is able to raise up a Martin Luther to take his place: end the martyrdom of Ridley and Latimer does but “light a candle in England which shall never be put out.” The casting of the Baptist into prison signalized the commencement of that ministry which unhinged the gates of hell. (Anonymous.)

Impediment changed into new impetus

I. We see a royal ambassador silenced.

II. We see a worthier envoy substituted.

III. We see the deathless energy of truth. No power known on earth can stop her silvery tongue. (D. Davies, M. A.)

Christ’s preaching

John’s position had been one of honour. We now contemplate him as the occupant of a dungeon.

I. The history of John’s connection with Herod is very instructive. It shows-

1. The feeling of the world in certain cases towards the truth of its teachers-they “hear it gladly.”

2. The experience of the faithful reprovers of human sin-a prison.

3. A leading feature of that kingdom which John introduced.

4. This was fitted to undeceive the Jews. Are you satisfied with the gospel economy?

II. No sooner was John cast into prison than Jesus Himself began to preach the gospel.

1. When a servant of God has finished his work, he must be satisfied to retire. We think experience, etc., lost; but no.

2. The world will never succeed in suppressing the truth. Let us not be oppressed with anxiety!

III. The Evangelist records the substance as well as the fact of Christ’s preaching.

IV. As soon as Christ began to preach the gospel He called His disciples.

1. On the fact of His calling His disciples we may remark:

2. On the manner of His calling His disciples, we may remark:

Jesus came into Galilee

The season was the spring, with its bright heaven, its fresh sweet earth, its gladsome, soft, yet strengthening air, its limpid living water. And within as without all was springtime, the season of million-fold forces, gladly and grandly creative, of sunlight now clear and blithesome, and now veiled with clouds that came only to break in fruitful showers. (Principal A. M. Fairbairn.)

The vicissitudes of a Godly life

I. That good men are often made the subject of social reproach. “John was put in prison.”

1. Because the inner meaning of their lives is frequently misunderstood.

2. Because the moral beauty of their character excites the envy of the wicked.

3. Because they are often called to rebuke the wickedness of those around them.

II. That useful men are often rendered incapable of work through the tyranny of others.

1. The power of regal authority to hinder the labours of the morally useful is only partial.

2. It is often capable of wise explanation-

3. It is deeply responsible.

III. That though one servant of truth may be removed another is immediately found to take his place.

IV. That the ministry called forth by the emergency is often better than the one removed. (Joseph S. Exell, M. A.)

Preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God.-

The scope of our Lord’s ministry

I. The kingdom here spoken of.

1. It was the kingdom of God.

2. It was at that time to be established.

II. What must we do to become subjects of this kingdom?

1. Repent of sin.

2. Believe the gospel. Application:

The kingdom of God

This term is used in various senses in the New Testament.

1. The presence of Christ upon earth.

2. The second coming of Christ.

3. His influence upon the heart.

4. Christianity as a Church.

5. Christianity as a faith.

6. The life eternal.

It points out sin to be turned from in sorrow: Christ to be believed in with joy. (T. M. Lindsay, D. D.)

The Kingdom of God: God reigning in men’s hearts

There is great meaning in the words that Jesus was continually using to describe the work that He did for men’s souls. He brought them into “the kingdom of God.” The whole burden of His preaching was to establish the kingdom of God. The purpose of the new birth for which He laboured was to make men subjects of the kingdom of God. Is it not clear what it means? The kingdom of God for any soul is that condition, anywhere in the universe, where God is that soul’s king, where it seeks and obeys the highest, where it loves truth and duty more than comfort and luxury. Have you entered into the kingdom of God? Oh, how much that means! Has any love of God taken possession of you, so that you want to do His will above all things, and try to do it all the time? Has Christ brought you there? If He has, how great and new and glorious the life of the kingdom seems. No wonder that He said you must be born again before you could enter there. How poor life seems outside that kingdom. How beautiful and glorious inside its gates! If I tried to tell you how Christ brings us there, I should repeat to you once more the old, familiar story. He comes and lives and dies for us. He touches us with gratitude. He sets before our softened lives His life. He makes us see the beauty of holiness, and the strength of the spiritual life in Him. He transfers His life to us through the open channel of faith, and so we come to live as He lives, by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God. How old the story is, but how endlessly fresh and true to Him whose own career it describes. (Phillips Brooks, D. D.)

The kingdom of God an inward state

Many people seem to suppose this means some realm after death, where those who have done nothing but mortify themselves here shall do nothing but enjoy themselves hereafter. But what Christ meant by the kingdom of heaven was a life begun here, passing through the grave and gate of death without any breach of spiritual continuity. Unchanged in essence was the life of His kingdom-changeable only in outward accidents. Its essence depended always not on where, but on what you were. The kingdom of heaven was always a state within, not a place, though it worked itself out here below in a visible Church. (H. R. Haweis, M. A.)

The Galilean ministry

I. When. After John’s imprisonment. One witness of the truth silenced; but another raised up. After Moses, Joshua; after Stephen, Paul.

II. Where. Galilee. Where could He find work so readily as amidst the ceaseless toil and turmoil of these teeming villages?

III. What.

1. Gospel of kingdom of God. Spiritual (1 Corinthians 15:50); righteous (Romans 14:17); near (Luke 21:31); inward (Luke 17:20-21).

2. Repentance and faith: thus completing the work of John. (H. Thorne.)

Christ the Evangelical minister

I. The preacher-“Jesus.” But Jesus differed from all other preachers.

1. He was Divine.

2. He was infallible.

3. He was sympathetic.

4. He was most clear and simple. “Common people heard him gladly,” etc.

5. He was most interesting.

6. Most faithful and earnest.

7. He preached most affectionately and tenderly. One of His very last appeals-“O Jerusalem,” etc. He wept over it, etc.

II. His theme. The gospel.

1. He was the subject of His own ministry.

2. He also proclaimed the kingdom of God.

3. The near approach of this kingdom.

4. The sphere of His ministry at this time was Galilee. Now the world is the field of the gospel-“Go ye into all the world,” etc.

III. The special appeal He made.

1. He urged repentance.

2. He demanded faith. The gospel news must be heard and received as true.

Learn:

1. We have the same Saviour.

2. The same gospel-now complete by His resurrection and gift of the Holy Spirit.

3. Its blessings are ours on the same terms.

4. Men perish by not believing the gospel of Christ. (J. Burns, D. D.)


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Mark 1:14". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/mark-1.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Now after John was delivered up, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of God, and saying, The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent ye, and believe in the gospel.

The kingdom of God ... This is Mark's favorite title of the kingdom, just as Matthew's favorite is "kingdom of heaven." The two expressions are one. Christ doubtless used both; and the Holy Spirit of inspiration upon the sacred authors guided them in the terminology which they employed. The near approach of the kingdom was announced in the earliest preaching of Jesus.

Repent ye, and believe in the gospel ... These words, along with reference to repentance and faith (in that order) in Hebrews 6:1 and Acts 20:10, have led to some religious theories that repentance precedes faith in the sinner's heart; but such notions are refuted by the fact that no unbeliever in the history of the race was ever known to repent. We may not, therefore, take Mark's expression here as indicating the time sequence of the appearance of repentance and faith in human hearts. There is apostolic precedent for using expressions like this without regard to the chronology of things mentioned. Thus Peter spoke of Jesus Christ, "whom ye slew and hanged on a tree" (Acts 5:30, KJV).

In these verses, and through Mark 4:34, Mark takes up the Galilean ministry, especially that in the vicinity of Capernaum.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/mark-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Now after that John was put in prison,.... In the castle of Macherus, by Herod, for reproving him for taking his brother Philip's wife:

Jesus came into Galilee: again, from whence he came to be baptized of John:

preaching the Gospel of the kingdom of God: the good news and glad tidings of the kingdom of the Messiah, or Gospel dispensation; which lies not in worldly pomp and splendour, in outward observances, in legal rites and ceremonies, but in righteousness, peace, and joy; in peace and pardon by the blood of Christ, in justification by his righteousness, and in free and full salvation by him.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/mark-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

7 Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God,

(7) After John is taken Christ shows himself more fully.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/mark-1.html. 1599-1645.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

JESUS GOES TO GALILEE

Matthew 4:12; Mark 1:14; & Luke 4:14. “And after that John was cast into prison, Jesus came unto Galilee.” Having entered upon His official Messiahship by purifying the temple at the Passover, and preached to the multitudes gathered on the Temple Campus during the great national feast; delivered that wonderful discourse to Nicodemus at night, the Apostle John bearing witness; and having wrought many miracles of which we have no specification; after the Passover, going out into the country north of the metropolis, He continues to preach and work miracles, His disciples baptizing the people, John the Baptist preaching in Enon near by, so that intercommunication between the audiences springs up, all observing that while Jesus is rapidly rising and magnetizing the multitudes, John is waning, — a crisis supervenes, resulting from the arrest of John the Baptist by Herod Antipas, the son of Herod the Great, and king of Galilee and Perea. Immediately after this, Jesus leaves Judea, and goes away to Galilee, apparently because of John’s arrest and imprisonment lest a similar fate shall overtake Him, and thus interfere with the work which He came to do. We see many judicious precautions adopted by Him at different times in order to prevent the interruption of His ministry till His work is done,


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Bibliography
Godbey, William. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/mark-1.html.

People's New Testament

Now after John was put into prison. Mark proceeds to the account of the Savior's public ministry in Galilee. Between Christ's baptism and this occurred the events narrated in John, chapters 2, 3 and 4. For notes on this ministry see Matthew 4:12-25.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/mark-1.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Jesus came into Galilee (ηλτεν ο Ιησους εις την Γαλιλαιανēlthen ho Iēsous eis tēn Galilaian). Here Mark begins the narrative of the active ministry of Jesus and he is followed by Matthew and Luke. Mark undoubtedly follows the preaching of Peter. But for the Fourth Gospel we should not know of the year of work in various parts of the land (Perea, Galilee, Judea, Samaria) preceding the Galilean ministry. John supplements the Synoptic Gospels at this point as often. The arrest of John had much to do with the departure of Jesus from Judea to Galilee (John 4:1-4).

Preaching the gospel of God (κηρυσσων το ευαγγελιον του τεουkērussōn to euaggelion tou theou). It is the subjective genitive, the gospel that comes from God. Swete observes that repentance (μετανοιαmetanoia) is the keynote in the message of the Baptist as gospel (ευαγγελιονeuaggelion) is with Jesus. But Jesus took the same line as John and proclaimed both repentance and the arrival of the kingdom of God. Mark adds to Matthew‘s report the words “the time is fulfilled” (πεπληρωται ο καιροςpeplērōtai ho kairos). It is a significant fact that John looks backward to the promise of the coming of the Messiah and signalizes the fulfilment as near at hand (perfect passive indicative). It is like Paul‘s fulness of time (πληρωμα του χρονουplērōma tou chronou) in Galatians 4:4 and fulness of the times (πληρωμα τον καιρωνplērōma ton kairōn) in Ephesians 1:10 when he employs the word καιροςkairos opportunity or crisis as here in Mark rather than the more general term χρονοςchronos Mark adds here also: “and believe in the gospel” (και πιστευετε εν τωι ευαγγελιωιkai pisteuete en tōi euaggeliōi). Both repent and believe in the gospel. Usually faith in Jesus (or God) is expected as in John 14:1. But this crisis called for faith in the message of Jesus that the Messiah had come. He did not use here the term Messiah, for it had come to have political connotations that made its use at present unwise. But the kingdom of God had arrived with the presence of the King. It does make a difference what one believes. Belief or disbelief in the message of Jesus made a sharp cleavage in those who heard him. “Faith in the message was the first step; a creed of some kind lies at the basis of confidence in the Person of Christ, and the occurrence of the phrase πιστυετε εν τωι ευαγγελιωιpistuete en tōi euaggeliōi in the oldest record of the teaching of our Lord is a valuable witness to this fact” (Swete).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/mark-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God,

Matthew 4:12.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/mark-1.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Now after John was delivered up1, Jesus came into Galilee2, preaching the gospel of God,
    JESUS SETS OUT FROM JUDEA FOR GALILEE. A. REASONS FOR RETIRING TO GALILEE. Matthew 4:12; Mark 1:14; Luke 3:19,20; John 4:1-4

  1. Now after John was delivered up. Either delivered up by the people to Herod (Matthew 17:12), or delivered up by Herod himself to the warden of the castle of Machaerus (Luke 12:58), or by Providence to Herod himself (Acts 2:23).

  2. Jesus came into Galilee. See Acts 2:23.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/mark-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Mark 1:14.Preaching the Gospel of the kingdom of God. Matthew appears to differ a little from the other two: for, after mentioning that Jesus left his own city Nazareth, and departed to Capernaum, he says: from that time Jesus began to preach. Luke and Mark, again, relate, that he taught publicly in his own country. But the solution is easy; for the words which Matthew employs, ἀπὸ τότε, from that time, ought to be viewed as referring, not to what immediately precedes, but to the whole course of the narrative. Christ, therefore, entered into the exercise of his office, when he arrived at Galilee. The summary of doctrine which is given by Matthew is not at all different from what, we have lately seen, was taught by John: for it consists of two parts, — repentance, and the announcement of grace and salvation. He exhorts the Jews to conversion, because the kingdom of God is at hand: that is, because God undertakes to govern his people, which is true and perfect happiness. The language of Mark is a little different, The kingdom of God is at hand: repent ye, and believe the Gospel But the meaning is the same: for, having first spoken of the restoration of the kingdom of God among the Jews, he exhorts them to repentance and faith.

But it may be asked, since repentance depends on the Gospel, why does Mark separate it from the doctrine of the Gospel? Two reasons may be assigned. God sometimes invites us to repentance, when nothing more is meant, than that we ought to change our life for the better. He afterwards shows, that conversion and “newness of life” (Romans 6:4) are the gift of God. This is intended to inform us, that not only is our duty enjoined on us, but the grace and power of obedience are, at the same time, offered. If we understand in this way the preaching of John about repentance, the meaning will be:” The Lord commands you to turn to himself; but as you cannot accomplish this by your own endeavors, he promises the Spirit of regeneration, and therefore you must receive this grace by faith.” At the same time, the faith, which he enjoins men to give to the Gospel, ought not, by any means, to be confined to the gift of renewal, but relates chiefly to the forgiveness of sins. For John connects repentance with faith, because God reconciles us to himself in such a manner, that we serve him as a Father in holiness and righteousness.

Besides, there is no absurdity in saying, that to believe the Gospel is the same thing as to embrace a free righteousness: for that special relation, between faith and the forgiveness of sins, is often mentioned in Scripture; as, for example, when it teaches, that we are justified by faith, (Romans 5:1.) In which soever of these two ways you choose to explain this passage, it still remains a settled principle, that God offers to us a free salvation, in order that we may turn to him, and live to righteousness. Accordingly, when he promises to us mercy, he calls us to deny the flesh. We must observe the designation which Paul gives to the Gospel, the kingdom of God: for hence we learn, that by the preaching of the Gospel the kingdom of God is set up and established among men, and that in no other way does God reign among men. Hence it is also evident, how wretched the condition of men is without the Gospel.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/mark-1.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

kingdom

(See Scofield "Matthew 6:33")


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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Mark 1:14". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/mark-1.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

14 Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God,

Ver. 14. Jesus came into Galilee] To decline Herod’s rage. And whereas it may seem that our Saviour herein took a wrong course, since Herod was governor of Galilee; we must know that the Pharisees were the men that delivered up John to Herod, Matthew 17:11-12; and that but for them there was no great fear of Herod.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/mark-1.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Mark 1:14

Two things appear on the surface in the Psalmists' interpretation of the idea of the kingdom of God.

I. One is its moral purpose. The kingdom of God is indeed exhibited in the Psalms in all its magnificence; in all its breadth; over nature and man; over the stars of the sky, and the cattle upon a thousand hills; over the storms of the desert and the waterfloods; over the march of history and the destinies of nations, and the secrets of the heart of man; over all that vast, inconceivable universe beyond the most distant star. But the impressiveness and the awe and the wonder with which the Psalmists dwelt on what was outward and tangible, makes all the more striking the clearness, the strength with which they discerned amid all the might and majesty of God's everlasting dominion; amid all its beauty and all its terrors, the supreme and governing power of a moral purpose of the law of holiness and righteousness and truth. There is a conviction about the kingdom, which, from the first Psalm to the last, knows no blessedness but the blessedness of righteousness, of innocence, of pardon; it is a kingdom far above man's power to influence; far above man's capacity to comprehend or measure; which is revealed to man only that he may understand that the law which never can be broken—more firm than the round world, which cannot be moved, than the heavens so far above us—the law which no change can touch, no might can alter, is the eternal law of right and wrong.

II. Equally noticeable is the breadth with which the Psalmists assumed and announced the universal character of the kingdom of God; for they were not insensible to the privileged position of the chosen people; they had all an Israelite's feeling that God dwelt and ruled in Israel as He did nowhere else; their hearts swelled at the remembrance of the greatness of their fortunes, at the pathetic vicissitudes of her most wonderful history. But though they were so conscious of their own wonderful election, the heathen are not, in their thoughts, excluded from the kingdom of God. He who dwelt in Zion or Jerusalem was yet God of all the families of the earth; and for the blessing of all the families of the earth was the blessing given to Abraham and his seed. That vast sea of nations which surged around the narrow bounds of Israel, so utterly unlike it in language, in worship, in history; separated from it as widely as if they had been inhabitants of another world, was yet saved and ruled by the All-Holy, whom they worshipped. They, the first fruits, the firstborn of mankind, were but the leaders in the song of praise.

R. W. Church, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxviii., p. 385.



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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/mark-1.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Mark 1:14. Now, after that John was put in prison, &c.— We have here a remarkable particular in the conduct of our Saviour: no sooner was he informed that Herod had thrown John in prison, than he quitted Judea, and went into Galilee. (Comp. Matthew 4:12—to the end.) And traversing it all over,—as well that part of it which was under Herod's jurisdiction, as that under Philip's; see Mark 1:39 and Matthew 4:23.—he there began first to preach continually to the people, elected several of his disciples to accompany him wherever he went, performed most astonishing works, and drew the attention of the whole country upon him. Now, had Jesus and the Baptist been associate impostors, as some infidels have supposed, nothing seems more improbable than that Jesus should single out this particular time, and the dominions of that particular prince, who had but just then imprisoned his partner in the same wicked imposture, in order there first to make trial of all his devices, procure more associates, and attended by them to draw the multitude about with him from all parts of the country. In an impostor, this would have been voluntarily seeking the same fate that his fore-runner had but just experienced, and in reality provoking Herod to put an end at once to all joint-machinations: but this is what no impostor whatever can be supposed desirous to have done. See Bell's Inquiry into the Divine Missions, &c. p. 388.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/mark-1.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

In this our Saviour's first beginning to preach the gospel, we have an account of the time when, the place where, and the sum of what, he preached.

Observe, 1. The time when our Lord began to preach, and that was after John the Baptist was cast into prison,

Where note, 1. The undue reward which the ministers of God do sometimes meet with from a wicked world; they are hated, persecuted, and imprisoned, for their courage in reproving sin: John for reproving Herod's incest was put in prison.

Note, 2. John was no sooner in prison, and stopped and hindered from preaching, but Christ began to preach. See the care and kindness of God towards his church, in that he never leaves it wholly destitute of the means of instruction: when some of his faithful ministers are restrained from preaching, he stirreth up others in their room, not suffering all their mouths to be stopped at once.

Observe, 2. The place where our Lord first preached, in Galilee. The land of Canaan, in our Saviour's time, was divided into three principal provinces: on the south, Judea; on the north, Galilee; in the midst, Samaria.

Galilee was divided into the upper and lower Galilee; the higher was called Galilee of the Gentiles, because it was the utmost part of the land, and so next unto the Gentiles. In this upper Galilee, Capernaum was the metropolis, or chief; and Chorazin a lesser city.

Now much of our Saviour's time was spent in Galilee; he was conceived and brought up at Nazareth, a city in Galilee; he first preached at Capernaum in Galilee; he wrought his first miracle at Cana in Galilee; his transfiguration was upon mount Tabor in Galilee; and our Saviour's ordinary residence was in Galilee. He came into Judea, and up to Jerusalem, only at the feasts: and after his resurrection he appoints his disciples to meet him in Galilee. Only his nativity, his passion, and ascension, were proper to Judea. His nativity at Bethlehem, his passion at Jerusalem,and his ascension upon mount Olivet, hard by Jerusalem.

Now all this demonstrates Christ to be the true and promised Messias; for according to prophecy, the Messias was to have his presence and principal abode in the province of Galilee, Isaiah 9:1-3, &c. Yet because he was of Galilee, the Jews would not believe him to be the Messiah, saying in scorn, Can any good thing come out of Galilee? Whereas our Saviour's habitation and free conversation there, was a proof unto them, and ought to have persuaded them, that according to the prophecy he was the very Christ.

Observe, 3. The sum of what our Lord preached, namely, a doctrine, and an exhortation. His doctrine is, That the time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; that is, that the time foretold by the prophets, when the kingdom of the Messiah should begin, was now come. The exhortation is, Therefore repent, and believe the gospel.

From the former note, That the Messiah's coming, or our Saviour's appearing in the flesh, was exactly at the time foretold by the holy prophets: The time is fulfilled, the kingdom of the Messiah is at hand.

Note, 2. That the great doctrines of repentance and faith are taught only in and by the gospel, and accordingly ought in a special manner to be preached and insisted upon by the ministers of the gospel. The doctrine of Christ, and his ambassadors, is and ought to be the same; they both teach the great doctrines of faith and repentance to a lost world: Repent, and believe the gospel.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/mark-1.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

14.] See note on Matthew 4:12.

παραδ. seems to have been the usual and well-known term for the imprisonment of John.

τὸ εὐαγ. τ. θ.] See reff., and note on Mark 1:1.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/mark-1.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 1:14 f. See on Matthew 4:12; Matthew 4:17; Luke 4:14 f.

εἰς τ. γαλιλ.] in order to be more secure than in the place where John had laboured; according to Ewald: “He might not allow the work of the Baptist to fall to pieces.” But this would not furnish a motive for His appearing precisely in Galilee. See Weizsäcker, p. 333. In Matthew also the matter is conceived of as ἀναχώρησις.

κηρύσσων] present participle with ἦλθεν. See Dissen, ad Pind. Ol. vii. 14, p. 81; Bornemann, ad Xen. Anab. vii. 7. 17; Stallbaum, ad Plat. Phaed. p. 116 C.

τὸ εὐαγγ. τοῦ θεοῦ] See on Mark 1:1.

ὅτι] recitative.

καιρός] the period, namely, which was to last until the setting up of the Messiah’s kingdom, καιρὸς οὗτος, Mark 10:30. It is conceived of as a measure. See on Galatians 4:4.

πιστεύετε ἐν τῷ εὐαγγ.] Believe on the gospel. As to πιστ. with ἐν, see on Galatians 3:26; Ephesians 1:13; frequently in the LXX. The object of faith is conceived as that in which the faith is fixed and based. Fritzsche takes ἐν as instrumental: “per evangelium ad fidem adducimini.” This is to be rejected, since the object of the faith would be wanting, and since τὸ εὐαγγ. is just the news itself, which Jesus gave in πεπλήρωται κ. τ. λ.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/mark-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Mark 1:14. παραδοθῆναι, was imprisoned) Mark writes as of a fact known to the reader, either from Matthew or from some other source of information. [Previously, more than once Jesus had visited the city of Jerusalem, as John relates. But His public walk in Galilee, and that a continued one (uninterrupted in its continuity) did not commence until after John was imprisoned.—V. g.]


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/mark-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 14,15. It should seem that John had but a short time wherein he exercised his public ministry: he was the son of a priest, Zacharias, Luke 1:13, and it is probable that he entered not upon his public ministry till he was thirty years of age (it was the priestly age, and the age at which Luke tells us our Saviour entered upon his public ministry). He was but about six months older than our Saviour, and was imprisoned as soon as our Saviour entered upon his ministry, indeed before we read of his entrance upon it. Upon his imprisonment, Christ begins to preach in Galilee the gospel by which he set up his kingdom, and which leadeth men to the kingdom of God.

And saying, The time is fulfilled, the time determined of God for the revelation of the Messias, and the grace of the gospel through him, foretold by the prophets, Daniel 2:44: hence Christ is said to have come in the fulness, and in the dispensation of the fulness of time, Galatians 4:4 Ephesians 1:10.

And the kingdom of God is at hand; the gracious dispensation of God in the gospel is at hand, or hath approached.

Repent ye, turn from the wickedness of your ways, and believe the gospel, or, in the gospel: to believe the gospel is one thing, to believe in the gospel (as it is here in the Greek) is another. The former phrase signifies no more than a firm and fixed assent to the proposition of the gospel; but to believe in the gospel, is to place our hope of salvation in the doctrine and promises of the gospel, which are the proximate object of our faith, though the primary object of it be the person of the Mediator. There is a repentance that must go before faith, that is the applicative of the promise of pardoning mercy to the soul; though true evangelical repentance, which is a sorrow for sin, flowing from the sense of the love of God in Christ, be the fruit and effect of faith. Our Saviour’s preaching agreeth with the Baptist’s, Matthew 3:2 John 3:23.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Mark 1:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/mark-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Put in prison; Matthew 14:3.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/mark-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

14. Καὶ μετὰ τὸ παραδοθῆναι. See crit. note. And after that John was delivered up, into the hands of Herod Antipas; cf. Mark 6:17. We are not told by whom John was delivered up, and some understand “by God,” who in a similar sense “delivered up” Jesus (Mark 9:31, Mark 10:33). The instruments were the Pharisees, and perhaps there is a hint that, as in the case of the Messiah (Mark 3:19, Mark 14:10), there was treachery. The view that Mk gives is that, when the Forerunner’s work ended (μετά), that of the Messiah began, but there is no hint given as to the amount of interval, which did not seem to Mk to be of importance. The Law passed, and the Gospel came; desinente lege consequenter oritur evangelium (Jerome). Mk says nothing, and perhaps knew nothing, of an earlier ministry in which the Baptist and Jesus were preaching simultaneously (John 4:1).

εἰς τὴν Γαλιλαίαν. Galilee was the most populous of the provinces into which Palestine was divided. Experience proved that it was a far more hopeful field than Jerusalem and Judaea (John 2:13 to John 4:3).

τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τ. θεοῦ. See crit. note. Either the gracious message which God sends or that which tells of Him; cf. Mark 1:1. Both meanings may be included. St Paul was perhaps the first to use the phrase (1 Thessalonians 2:8-9; Romans 1:1; Romans 15:16; 2 Corinthians 11:7). Because the expression seemed strange, τῆς βασιλείας was inserted at an early date ([189][190] Latt. Syr-Pesh.). Τὸ εὐαγγ. is freq. in Mk, rare in Mt. and Acts, and is not found at all in Lk. or Jn. Only in ch. 1 does Mk use κηρύσσω of Christ; elsewhere He is said διδάσκειν.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/mark-1.html. 1896.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus began His Galilean ministry, the first major phase of His public ministry, after His forerunner had ended his ministry. Jesus" forerunner suffered a fate that prefigured what Jesus would experience (cf. Mark 9:31; Mark 14:18). Mark used the same root word in Greek to describe both men. The passive voice of the verb paradidomi ("taken into custody" or "put in prison," lit. delivered up) suggests God"s sovereign control over both men"s situations.

Probably Jesus chose Galilee as His site of ministry because the influence of hostile Pharisees and chief priests was less there than it was in Judea. Fewer Jews lived in Samaria, which lay between Judea and Galilee.

". . . Jesus changes setting more than forty times in his travels throughout Galilee and into gentile territory." [Note: Rhoads and Michie, p68.]

Jesus heralded the good news of God. The Greek construction permits two different translations: "the good news about God" and "the good news from God." Mark probably intended the second meaning because the next verse explains what the good news that God revealed through Jesus was. Preaching this good news was Jesus" characteristic activity, and it was foundational for all the other forms of His ministry.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/mark-1.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 1:14. Now after John was delivered up, i.e., put in prison. On the reason of this imprisonment, see chap. Mark 6:17.

Jesus came into Galilee. See Matthew 4:12. Not from fear of Herod, but on account of the opposition of the Pharisees, and also to reach the Galilean masses who had been impressed by the preaching of John.

Preaching the gospel of God. See below and comp. Matthew 4:17; Matthew 4:23, from the latter passage the words: ‘of the kingdom’ have crept in here.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/mark-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Mark 1:14. τὸ εὐαγγ. τ. θεοῦ: the Gospel of God, the good news sent by God to men through Jesus, a strong name for Christ’s message.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/mark-1.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

after. Greek. meta. App-104. This commences the first subject of the Lord"s ministry, which occupies in Mark only six verses. See App-119.

put in prison = was dellivered up.

Galilee. App-169.

the kingdom of God. See App-114.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/mark-1.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) Now after that John was put in prison.—St. Mark agrees with St. Matthew in omitting all our Lord’s early ministry in Galilee and Jerusalem, and takes the imprisonment of the Baptist as his starting-point. That imprisonment is assumed here to be known; but the facts connected with it are not related till Mark 6:17-20.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/mark-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God,
A. M. 4031. A.D. 27. after
Matthew 4:12; 11:2; 14:2; Luke 3:20; John 3:22-24
preaching
Isaiah 61:1-3; Matthew 4:23; 9:35; Luke 4:17-19,43,44; 8:1; Acts 20:25; 28:23; Ephesians 2:17

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/mark-1.html.

Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Mark 1:14 to Mark 3:6. The First Period of the Galilean Ministry.

Mark 1:14 f. Jesus Announces in Galilee the Nearness of the Kingdom.—Not immediately after the Temptation, but after the arrest of John (Mark 6:17), Jesus returned to Galilee from the south country and took up John's message. Like John, Jesus calls men to repent because God's kingdom is near. But the menace of judgment uttered by John becomes good tidings on the lips of Jesus. If the phrase "believe the gospel" is due to Mk. and not to Jesus, it rightly characterizes the contrast between Jesus and His forerunner; cf. Mark 2:18 f., Luke 4:17 f., Matthew 11:18 f.


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Bibliography
Peake, Arthur. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pfc/mark-1.html. 1919.

The Bible Study New Testament

After John had been put in prison. Mark goes directly to Jesus' work in Galilee. [John records the events between Jesus' baptism and the ministry in Galilee (John chapters 2-4).] See Matthew 4:12-25 and notes.


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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/mark-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

14 Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God

It is almost as though Christ beginning His ministry was dependent on the decline of the Baptist. Matthew 4:12 mentions "Now when Jesus had heard that John was cast into prison, he departed into Galilee;"The Matthew text indicates this even further, however it would seem that Christ was in the area that John was in and when John was imprisoned, Christ left that area to go to Galilee which is north of the area attributed to John. Mark also rather indicates that Mark was in Galilee when he records, "Jesus came into Galilee."

Christ leaving upon the imprisonment does not indicate that He was afraid of trouble, but just that He knew His purpose on earth and knew that He had not finished his work. Other places in the Gospels show Christ desirous of not drawing attention to himself (Mark 7:35 ff for one) so that He would not be hindered in His work on earth.


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Copyright 2008. Used by Permission. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the author, except as provided by U.S.A. copyright laws. Do feel free to make copies for friends that might be interested as long as you do not make profit from the copies. This is God's work and I don't want anyone to profit from it in a material way.

Bibliography
Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on Mark 1:14". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/mark-1.html.


Lectionary Calendar
Thursday, November 15th, 2018
the Week of Proper 27 / Ordinary 32
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