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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Mark 10:50

Throwing aside his cloak, he jumped up and came to Jesus.

Adam Clarke Commentary

And he, casting away his garment - He cast off his outward covering, a blanket, or loose piece of cloth, the usual upper garment of an Asiatic mendicant, which kept him from the inclemency of the weather, that he might have nothing to hinder him from getting speedily to Christ. If every penitent were as ready to throw aside his self-righteousness and sinful incumbrances, as this blind man was to throw aside his garment, we should have fewer delays in conversions than we now have; and all that have been convinced of sin would have been brought to the knowledge of the truth. The reader will at least pardon the introduction of the following anecdote, which may appear to some as illustrative of the doctrine grounded on this text.

A great revival of religion took place in some of the American States, about the year 1773, by the instrumentality of some itinerant preachers sent from England. Many, both whites and blacks, were brought to an acquaintance with God who bought them. Two of these, a white man and a negro, meeting together, began to speak concerning the goodness of God to their souls, (a custom which has ever been common among truly religious people). Among other things they were led to inquire how long each had known the salvation of God; and how long it was, after they were convinced of their sin and danger, before each got a satisfactory evidence of pardoning mercy. The white man said, "I was three months in deep distress of soul, before God spoke peace to my troubled, guilty conscience." "But it was only a fortnight," replied the negro, "from the time I first heard of Jesus, and felt that I was a sinner, till I received the knowledge of salvation by the remission of sins." "But what was the reason," said the white man, "that you found salvation sooner than I did?" "This is the reason," replied the other; "you white men have much clothing upon you, and when Christ calls, you cannot run to him; but we poor negroes have only this, (pointing to the mat or cloth which was tied round his waist), and when we hear the call, we throw it off instantly, and run to him."

Thus the poor son of Ham illustrated the text without intending it, as well as any doctor in the universe. People who have been educated in the principles of the Christian religion imagine themselves on this account Christians; and, when convinced of sin, they find great difficulty to come as mere sinners to God, to be saved only through the merits of Christ. Others, such as the negro in question, have nothing to plead but this, We have never heard of thee, and could not believe in thee of whom we had not heard; but this excuse will not avail now, as the true light is come - therefore they cast off this covering, and come to Jesus. See this miraculous cure explained at large on Matthew 20:29-34.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/mark-10.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And he, casting away his garment, sprang up, and came to Jesus.

The desperation of destructive critics challenging the historicity of this gospel is nowhere more evident than in the allegations of some to the effect that the blind man's casting his garment away shows that he was a Greek, making the narrative a misfit. Such pettifoggery, however, is exposed in the fact that Mark himself described a young man in Jerusalem (most probably himself) as "having a linen cloth cast about him" (Mark 14:51).


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/mark-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he casting away his garment,.... His upper garment, and which no doubt was little worth; though this he did, that he might make the quicker dispatch to Christ:

rose; from off the bank, or ground, whereon he sat, in an instant: and "sprung up", as the Vulgate Latin, and Beza's ancient copy read, with great nimbleness, and in haste:

and came to Jesus; being led by the persons that were sent to call him. It may be observed from hence, that such who are effectually called by the grace of Christ, of which this man was an emblem, hate the garment spotted with the flesh; and: put off the old man, as to the former conversation, being called by an holy God, with an holy calling, to holiness in heart and life; and that by the Gospel, which teaches to deny sin, and live a holy conversation: and these also cast away the garment of their own righteousness, it being as fig leaves, a spider's web, filthy rags, and a beggarly robe, as this man's was; and come nakedly to Christ, for righteousness, and renounce their own in point of justification, that being an hinderance to their coming to him for his. The Gospel reveals a better righteousness to them than their own, more suitable to them, who are called from the dunghill, to sit among princes, and to inherit the throne of glory; and then such rise in the strength of grace, and come forth to Christ, for righteousness, peace, pardon, life, and salvation.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/mark-10.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Casting away his garment (αποβαλων το ιματιον αυτουapobalōn to himation autou). Second aorist active participle. Outer robe in his haste.

Sprang up (αναπηδησαςanapēdēsas). Leaping up, vivid details again in Mark.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/mark-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Rose ( ἀναστὰς )

The best texts read ἀναπήδησας leaped up, or, as Rev., sprang up.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/mark-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he, casting away his garment, rose, and came to Jesus.

Casting away his garment — Through joy and eagerness.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/mark-10.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he, casting away his garment, sprang up, and came to Jesus1.

  1. And he, casting away his garment, sprang up, and came to Jesus. He cast off his outer garment or "pallium", which was like a large shawl thrown over the shoulders, and is elsewhere called a cloak. See . It probably represented more than half the beggar's wealth, but he valued his eyesight more than it, and cast it aside because it hindered him in reaching Jesus through the crowd. Many today would come to Jesus, but their steps are impeded by some trifling obstacle (Isaiah 64:6). In the race to win the presence of Christ on high, Christians are advised to lay aside every weight (Hebrews 12:1,2).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/mark-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

His garment; his outer garment.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/mark-10.html. 1878.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

GARMENTS TO BE CAST AWAY

‘He, casting away his garment, rose, and came to Jesus.’

Mark 10:50

We all of us wear such an outer garment wrapped about our soul. Habits (the word habit means a garment, something worn), more or less confirmed, may not only impede our progress, but trip us up and make us fall.

I. Spiritual sloth.—It is the cause of many another sin which is not commonly traced to it. Religion demands effort, and sloth is not willing to give it, but excuses itself in a hundred ways. How shall we get rid of this closely clinging habit? Clearly it must be by a resolute effort, and succession of efforts: by putting on with prayer the opposing habits of industry, promptitude, punctuality, self-restraint; by discovering what are to us the occasions of sloth, and placing our watch there.

II. The habit of making excuses—the cloak we wrap around ourselves to shelter ourselves from blame or criticism which, like a keen wind, would search us through and through. The word tells its own story, for what is an excuse but an effort to withdraw ourselves and our conduct from blame or suspicion, or to escape some irksome or disagreeable duty? [The case of Adam (Genesis 3:9-12); Aaron (Exodus 32:21-24); Saul (1 Samuel 13:11-12; 1 Samuel 15:13-15; 1 Samuel 15:20-21).] It is a great proof of moral courage when a man frankly owns himself to be in the wrong, no matter what the consequences.

III. Wandering thoughts.—We are so apt to forget our responsibility in the matter of our thoughts, and yet our powers of mind are of all our natural gifts the most precious, as they are the most wonderful. Our thoughts cannot be kept inactive. If we would keep them from forbidden ways we must direct them to right ways. Satan finds mischief for idle thoughts, as well as for idle hands. We must be diligent to give them constant employment.

IV. Fault-finding.—This habit makes its wearers to be continually on the look-out for the mote in their brother’s eye, while they disregard the beam that is in their own. Nor does it stop short at finding fault with the actions of another; it must go on to impute unworthy motives to those actions. Instead of being on the look-out for some ground of complaint, we must try to be on the look-out for some ground of rejoicing.

These are hindrances to Christian progress, as was the outer cloak of the blind beggar, and they are also hindrances to self-knowledge.

—Rev. W. G. Mosse.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/mark-10.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

50 And he, casting away his garment, rose, and came to Jesus.

Ver. 50. And he casting away his garment] Though a beggar, he stood not upon the loss of his coat; but for joy of his calling, cast it from him. So John 4:28; Hebrews 12:1.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/mark-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Mark 10:50. He, casting away his garment, That is, his upper garment, that it might not hinderhim a moment in his approach to Christ. The blind man herein furnishes us with an instructive lesson, that we should rise no less eagerly, no less gladly cast away our cloak, lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and without all delay or hesitation follow Christ in the way, running with patience the race that is set before us, whenever he calls us by his word and Spirit. Our repentance must not be deferred from day to day: but to-day, if we will hear his voice, we must take care not to harden our hearts.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/mark-10.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

50.] ἀποβαλών, κ. τ. λ.,—signs of an eye-witness, which make us again believe, that here we have the literally exact account of what took place.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/mark-10.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Mark 10:50. ἀποβαλὼν, casting away) through eagerness and joy·


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/mark-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Mark 10:46"


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Mark 10:50". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/mark-10.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Mark

AN EAGER COMING

Mark 10:50.

Mark’s vivid picture-long wail of the man, crowd silencing him, but wheeling round when Christ calls him-and the quick energy of the beggar, flinging away his cloak, springing to his feet-and blind as he was, groping his way.

I. What we mean by coming to Jesus:-faith, communion, occupation of mind, heart, and will.

II. How eagerly we shall come when we are conscious of need. This man wanted his eyesight: do we not want too?

III. We must throw off our hindrances if we would come to Him.

Impediments of various kinds. ‘Lay aside every weight’-not only sins, but even right things that hinder. Occupations, pursuits, affections, possessions, sometimes have to be put away altogether; sometimes but to be minimised and kept in restraint. There is no virtue in self-denial except as it helps us to come nearer Him.

IV. We must do it with quick, glad energy.

Bartimaeus springs to his feet at once with a bound. So we should leap to meet Jesus, our sight-giver. How slothful and languid we often are. We do not put half as much heart into our Christian life as people do into common things. Far more pains are taken by a ballet-dancer to learn her posturing than by most Christians to keep near Christ.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/mark-10.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Casting away his garment; his outer garment, that he might more readily go to Jesus.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/mark-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

50. ἀποβαλὼν τὸ ἱμάτιον. It was the most valuable thing that he had, and it might never be recovered; but that is nothing, if only he can reach the Son of David. Syr-Sin. makes him take up his garment, as if ἐπιβαλών were the word; and Mrs Lewis adopts this as original.

ἀναπηδήσας. In spite of his blindness; not a moment is to be lost. The graphic word is found nowhere else in N.T., and the whole of this graphic verse is peculiar to Mk. Swete quotes a remarkable parallel from Lucian, Catapl. 15. Note the combination of participles.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on Mark 10:50". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/mark-10.html. 1896.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 10:50. Casting away his garment. A detail indicating that the narrative comes from an eyewitness. Bartimeus did not stop to care for the cloak that might be lost, if it impeded his progress. Nay, if he received his sight, it could easily be found again.

Sprang up. This mark of eagerness is also peculiar to this account.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/mark-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Mark 10:50. Graphic description of the beggar’s eager response—mantle thrown off, jumping to his feet, he comes, runs, to Jesus. Though blind he needs no guide (Lk. provides him with one); led by his ear.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/mark-10.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

casting away = casting aside. Compare Romans 11:15,


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/mark-10.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he, casting away his garment, rose, and came to Jesus.
Philippians 3:7-9; Hebrews 12:1

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Mark 10:50". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/mark-10.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Sunday, October 20th, 2019
the Week of Proper 24 / Ordinary 29
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