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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Mark 4:2

And He was teaching them many things in parables, and was saying to them in His teaching,


Adam Clarke Commentary

He taught them many things by parables - See every part of this parable of the sower explained on Matthew 13:1; (note), etc.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/mark-4.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And he taught them many things in parables, and said unto them in his teaching,

Practically all of this chapter deals with parables. The Hebrews had but a single word for several English words, including both PARABLE and PROVERB. "A parable is a truth presented by a similitude, being of necessity figurative"; but a proverb may be "figurative, but not necessarily."[3] The reason for Jesus' resort to the method of teaching by parables is complex: (1) He did so in order to fulfill prophecy. (2) He did so to confound the spies of the Pharisees. (3) He thus challenged his disciples to greater spiritual discernment. (4) The Hebrew people were familiar with that method. (5) It made his teachings easier to remember. (6) The parables were interesting in the highest degree. (7) They contained the dynamic teaching of Jesus in language which was unsuitable to the court-charges the Pharisees were anxious to make against him. In short, he, by this method, taught those who wished to know the truth and confounded those who sought to oppose him. In the literature of all the world, there is nothing to compare with the parables of Jesus.

ENDNOTE:

[3] E. Bickersteth. The Pulpit Commentary (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1962), Vol. 16, p. 156.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/mark-4.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he taught them many things by parables,.... As he sat in the ship, and they stood on shore;

and said unto them in his doctrine; as he was teaching them, and delivering unto them the doctrine he had received from his Father: though the Jews sayF3Bereshit Rabba, sect 98. fol. 85. 3. , that

"the Israelites will have no need לתלמודו של מלך משיח, "of the doctrine of the king Messiah, in the time to come"; because it is said, "unto him shall the Gentiles seek", and not the Israelites.'

But it appears from hence, and many other places, that the Israelites both stood in need of his doctrine, and sought after it; and very excellent it was; the doctrine of God, and of the grace of God; and was spoken with authority, and in such a manner as never man spake, and which he delivered to his apostles; and which, if ministers bring not with them, should not be bid God speed.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/mark-4.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

And he taught them many things by parables, and said unto them in his doctrine — or “teaching.”


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/mark-4.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

He taught them (εδιδασκεν αυτουςedidasken autous). Imperfect tense describing it as going on.

In parables (εν παραβολαιςen parabolais). As in Mark 3:23, only here more extended parables. See notes in Matthew 13 for discussion concerning Christ‘s use of parables. Eight are given there, one (the Lamp both in Mark 4:21 and Luke 8:16 (both Sower and the Lamp in Luke), one alone in Mark 4:26-29 (seed growing of itself) not in Matthew or Luke, ten on this occasion. Only four are mentioned in Mark 4:1-34 (The Sower, the Lamp, the Seed Growing of Itself, the Mustard Seed). But Mark adds (Mark 4:34) “without a parable spake he not unto them,” clearly meaning that Jesus spoke many others on this occasion and Matt. after mentioning eight (Matthew 13:34) makes the same statement. Manifestly, therefore, Jesus spoke many parables on this day and all theories of exegesis or dispensations on the basis of the number of these kingdom parables are quite beside the mark.

In beginning Jesus said:Hearken (ΑκουετεAkouete). It is significant that even Jesus had to ask people to listen when he spoke. See also Mark 4:9.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/mark-4.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he taught them many things by parables, and said unto them in his doctrine,

He taught them many things by parables — After the usual manner of the eastern nations, to make his instructions more agreeable to them, and to impress them the more upon attentive hearers. A parable signifies not only a simile or comparison, and sometimes a proverb, but any kind of instructive speech, wherein spiritual things are explained and illustrated by natural, Proverbs 1:6.

To understand a proverb and the interpretation — The proverb is the literal sense, the interpretation is the spiritual resting in the literal sense killeth, but the spiritual giveth life.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/mark-4.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he taught them many things in parables1, and said unto them in his teaching,

  1. And he taught them many things in parables. While Jesus had used parables before, this appears to be first occasion when he strung them together in a discourse. "Parable" comes from the Greek "paraballo", which means, "I place beside" in order to compare. It is the placing of a narrative describing an ordinary event in natural life beside an implied spiritual narrative for the purpose of illustrating the spiritual.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/mark-4.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 And he taught them many things by parables, and said unto them in his doctrine,

Ver. 2. He taught them many things by parables] Ministers must likewise fetch comparisons from things most familiar and best known to their hearers, as the prophets from fishes when they have to deal with the Egyptians; from flocks and herds, when with the Arabians; from merchandise and navigation, when with the Tyrians and Sidonians, &c.; and as our Saviour from fishing, when he dealeth with fishers; from sowing, when with seedsmen, &c.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/mark-4.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

2.] Out from among the πολλά, the great mass of His teaching, one parable is selected, which He spoke during it— ἐν τῇ διδ. αὐτοῦ.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/mark-4.html. 1863-1878.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Mark 4:1"


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Mark 4:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/mark-4.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

2. ἐδίδασκεν. The imperf. is again accurate; cf. Mark 1:21; Mark 1:32; Mark 1:35; Mark 1:45, Mark 2:2; Mark 2:13, Mark 3:2; Mark 3:11; Mark 3:23. Both A.V. and R.V. make πολλά a cogn. acc., but it is probably adverbial as usual, meaning “often,” i.e. “in many parables,” in paravolis multis (d). See on Mark 3:2. Parables appear to have become more freq. as Christ’s audiences became larger and more mixed in character. Of these Mk gives us only four, of which only one, the Seed growing secretly (Mark 4:26-29), is peculiar to his Gospel. Parables instructed the real disciples, without harming the careless, and without giving openings to hostile listeners. See Hastings’ D.B. art. “Parable.”

ἐν τῇ διδαχῇ. In the course of His teaching. Here and Mark 12:38 only; 2 John 1:9 is different. In the Gospels, διδασκαλία occurs only in Mark 7:7 = Matthew 15:9. Burkitt calls attention to the fact that the Sower, the Seed growing secretly, and the Mustard-seed “are extraordinarily appropriate in the setting given them by S. Mark. The seed had been sown, the first harvest of disciples had just been reaped, although much of what had been said had fallen on deaf or forgetful ears.”


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Mark 4:2". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/mark-4.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2. In his doctrine — That is, in his teaching.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/mark-4.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 4:2. And he taught them. The reference is to His habit of teaching.

Many things. Out of these Mark selects what follows.

In his teaching, perhaps, with a reference to this particular kind of teaching. Christ’s teaching was authoritative, and in this as in most cases, doctrinal. He presents new truth here, not mere exhortation (see Mark 4:11).


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/mark-4.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Mark 4:2. πολλά: a vague expression, but implying that the staple of that day’s teaching consisted of parables, probably all more or less of the same drift as the parable of the Sower, indicating that in spite of the ever-growing crowds Jesus was dissatisfied with the results of His popular ministry in street and synagogue = much seed-sowing, little fruit. The formation of the disciple-circle had revealed that dissatisfaction in another way. Probably some of the parables spoken in the boat have not been preserved, the Sower serving as a sample.— ἐν τῇ διδαχῇ α. In the teaching of that day He said inter alia what follows.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/mark-4.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

taught = was teaching.

by = in. Greek. en. App-104. Not the same word as in verses: Mark 4:31, Mark 4:38.

doctrine = teaching.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/mark-4.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he taught them many things by parables, and said unto them in his doctrine,

And he taught them many things by parables, and said unto them in his doctrine , [ didachee (Greek #1322)] - or 'teaching.'

After this parable is recorded, the Evangelist says,


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/mark-4.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) In his doctrine.—Better, in His teaching.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/mark-4.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he taught them many things by parables, and said unto them in his doctrine,
by parables
11,34; 3:23; Psalms 49:4; 78:2; Matthew 13:3,10,34,35
in his
12:38; Matthew 7:28; John 7:16,17; 18:19

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/mark-4.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Mark 4:2

"And he taught them many things by parables."— Mark 4:2

The Scripture employs two beautiful figures to illustrate the reception of the divine testimony. One is the committing of the seed to the ground, as in the parable of the sower. The husbandman scatters the seed in the bosom of the earth, and the ground having been previously ploughed and reduced to a beautiful tillage, opens its bosom to receive the grain. After a little time the seed begins to germinate, to strike a root downward, and shoot a germ upward; as the Lord speaks, "First the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear."

This emblem beautifully represents how the testimony of Jesus Christ finds an entrance to the soul, takes root downward and carries a shoot upward. The root downward is into the depths of a tender conscience; and the shoot upward is the aspiration, breathing, and longing of the soul for the living God.

The other figure is that of grafting. "Receive," says James , "with meekness the engrafted word, which is able to save your souls." Now when a scion is first put into the stock, after a little time sap begins to flow out of the stock into the scion, and this sap unites the two together. So it is spiritually when the soul receives the testimony of Christ. The testimony of Christ is received into a broken heart, as the scion is inserted into and received by the stock. As, then, life flows out of the stock into the scion, it creates and cements a sweet and blessed union with God"s word and him of whom the word testifies. Thus it grows up into a living bough, which brings forth blossoms of hope, leaves of a consistent profession, and fruit of a godly life.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Mark 4:2". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/mark-4.html.

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