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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Mark 7:28

But she answered and said to Him, "Yes, Lord, but even the dogs under the table feed on the children's crumbs."

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

But she answered and said unto him, Yea, Lord; even the dogs under the table eat of the children's crumbs.

Yea, Lord ... This says, "Yes, Lord, I indeed belong to the people called `dogs' by the Jews; but is it too much to ask that a LITTLE dog under the children's table might have just a crumb of the bounty which you have given to them?" This woman's reply was rich with the profoundest truth of all time. Note the implications of what she said: (1) By placing herself under the children's table, she laid claim to a place, lowly as it was, in the household of God. As Trench observed, the woman made this plea:

Saidest thou "dogs"? It is well; I accept the title and the place; for the dogs have a portion too, not indeed the first, not the children's portion, but a portion still - the crumbs which fall from the Master's table.[13]

(2) She appealed not to the children, but to the Master. The children, as represented by the apostles, had stood adamantly by, not interceding on the woman's behalf, actually demanding that the Lord get rid of her (see Matthew); so there was no mercy for her in the hearts of the children; therefore, she appealed not to them but to the Lord! (3) She identified the table as not belonging to the children but as "their master's table"! (Matthew 15:27). God's mercies did not derive from the chosen people but from Himself. The table of God's benefits did not belong to the children but to God!

ENDNOTE:

[13] Ibid., p. 373.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/mark-7.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And she answered and said unto him, yes, Lord,.... Agreeing to, and acquiescing in, what he said; which she seemed to have understood, though delivered in a proverbial way; and very appropriately replies,

yet the dogs under the table eat of the children's crumbs; which they leave, or let fall: signifying that she did not envy the blessings of the Jews, or desire any thing might be done injurious to them; only that this favour might be granted her, which she owned she was unworthy of, that her daughter might be healed. She tacitly owns, that the character of dogs belonged to the Gentiles, and to her and hers among the rest; that they were vile and base in themselves, inferior to the Jews, as to privileges, like dogs under the table; that the provisions with which the table of the Gospel ministry was furnished, was not for them; at least, that they were quite undeserving of them: but however, whereas dogs were allowed to eat crumbs, which now and then fell from the table, or out of the children's hands and laps; so such unworthy Gentiles as she, might be allowed a small benefit or favour by the bye, when it did not take from, and was no disadvantage to the Jews; See Gill on Matthew 15:27.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/mark-7.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And she answered and said unto him, p Yes, Lord: yet the dogs under the table eat of the children's crumbs.

(p) As if she said, "It is as thou sayest Lord, for it is enough for the dogs if they can but gather up the crumbs that are under the table; therefore I crave the crumbs and not the children's bread."

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/mark-7.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

And she answered and said unto him, Yes, Lord — or, as the same word is rendered in Matthew 15:27. “Truth, Lord.”

yet the dogs eat of the children‘s crumbs — “which fall from their master‘s table” (Matthew 15:27). “I thank Thee, O blessed One, for that word! That‘s my whole case. Not of the children? True. A dog? True also: Yet the dogs under the table are allowed to eat of the children‘s crumbs - the droppings from their master‘s full table: Give me that, and I am content: One crumb of power and grace from Thy table shall cast the devil out of my daughter.” Oh, what lightning quickness, what reach of instinctive ingenuity, do we behold in this heathen woman!


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/mark-7.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Even the dogs under the table (και τα κυναρια υποκατω της τραπεζηςkai ta kunaria hupokatō tēs trapezēs). A delightful picture. Even the little dogs (κυναριαkunaria) under the table eat of the children‘s crumbs (εστιουσιν απο των πσιχιων των παιδιωνesthiousin apo tōn psichiōn tōn paidiōn). Little dogs, little scraps of bread (πσιχιονpsichion diminutive of πσιχοςpsichos morsel), little children (παιδιαpaidia diminutive of παιςpais). Probably the little children purposely dropped a few little crumbs for the little dogs. These household dogs, pets of and loved by the children. Braid Scots has it: “Yet the wee dowgs aneath the table eat o‘ the moole o‘ the bairns.” “A unique combination of faith and wit” (Gould). Instead of resenting Christ‘s words about giving the children‘s bread to the dogs (Gentiles) in Mark 7:27, she instantly turned it to the advantage of her plea for her little daughter.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/mark-7.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Mark adds under the table.

The children's crumbs

See on Matthew 15:26. This would indicate that the little dogs were pet dogs of the children, their masters.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/mark-7.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

But she answered and saith unto him, Yea, Lord; even the dogs under the table eat of the children's crumbs1.

  1. Yea, Lord; even the dogs under the table eat of the children's crumbs. Jesus had suggested that domestic "order" by which dogs are required to wait until the meal is over before they receive their portion; but with a wit made keen by her necessity, she replies by alluding to the well-known fact that dogs under the table are permitted to eat the crumbs "even while the meal is in progress"; intimating thereby her hope to receive and before all the needs of Israel had first been satisfied. By using the word "dogs" Jesus did not mean to convey the impression that he shared the Jewish prejudices against Gentiles; a construction which would be contrary to Matthew 8:10-12 Luke 4:25,26.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/mark-7.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Scofield's Reference Notes

And she

She, however, answered, saying, True, Lord! and yet the little dogs under the table eat from the children's crumbs. Romans 11:24; Ephesians 2:11-22.


Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Mark 7:28". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/mark-7.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

28 And she answered and said unto him, Yes, Lord: yet the dogs under the table eat of the children’s crumbs.

Ver. 28. Yes, Lord] {See Trapp on "Matthew 15:27"}


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/mark-7.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

28. καὶ γὰρ.…] See on Matt.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/mark-7.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Mark 7:28. ὑποκάτω τῆς τραπέζης, under the table) Arguing great submission on the part of the woman. Yet she alleges as an argument the nearness [of her country to Israel; as of the dogs to their master’s table].— τῶν παιδίων, of the boys [Engl. Vers., losing the distinction between this and τέκνων, of the children]) who often lavish bread wastely.— παίδια(52) differ from τέκνα, children, Mark 7:27, a word whereby right to the father’s bread is denoted.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/mark-7.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Mark 7:24"


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Mark 7:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/mark-7.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

28. ἡ δὲ ἀπεκρίθη καὶ λέγει. The ἀπεκρίθη is not mere amplification; it was an answer and a witty answer. She seizes on Christ’s repelling words and turns them into an argument in her favour: δραξαμένη τῶν τοῦ Χριστοῦ ῥημάτων, ἀπʼ αὐτῶν πλέκει συνηγορίαν ἑαυτῆς (Euthym.). The historic pres. is recognized so completely as historic that it can be combined with an aor. See on Mark 8:29 sub fin.

Ναί, κύριε· καὶ τὰ κυνάρια. Yea, Lord, and the doggies; not “yet the dogs” (A.V.), nor “even the dogs” (R.V.). She fully assents to the Lord’s utterance and carries it on to her own conclusion; “Quite so, Lord; and in that case I may have a crumb.” Mt. has καὶ γάρ, giving an additional reason for her request. Ναί = ἀμήν, but without the religious tone of the Hebrew word (2 Corinthians 1:20; Revelation 1:7; Revelation 22:20). Syr-Sin. has “the crumbs which are over from the children’s table.” The words may mean the crumbs thrown by the children to their pets. In N.T., ἐσθ. ἐκ (John 6:26; John 6:50-51; 1 Corinthians 9:7; 1 Corinthians 11:28; etc.) is more common than ἐσθ. ἀπό (Genesis 2:16; Genesis 3:1-2; Genesis 3:5).


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Mark 7:28". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/mark-7.html. 1896.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘But she answered and says to him, “Yes, Lord. Even the dogs under the table eat of the children’s crumbs.” ’

The woman recognised humbly that what Jesus said was right and proper. He was a Jewish prophet and His message was to the Jews and concerned the God of Israel. But she had caught on to the opportunity He had left open and applied it accordingly. The pet dogs do not eat at the table but they are allowed the crumbs. Would not then the God of Israel have compassion on her despite her race?

The Pharisees had criticised the eating of bread in His presence by defiled hands, because they wanted to be rid of Him, but this woman was happy to receive even His crumbs.

‘Lord.’ Here meaning ‘sir’, but Mark wanted his readers to see its double meaning.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/mark-7.html. 2013.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Mark 7:28. ἀπεκρίθη, aorist, hitherto imperfect. We come now to what Mk. deems the main point of the story, the woman’s striking word.— ὑποκάτω τ. τραπ., the dogs under the table, waiting for morsels, a realistic touch.— τῶν ψιχίων τ. π., not merely the crumbs which by chance fall from the table, but morsels surreptitiously dropt by the children (“qui panem saepe prodigunt,” Beng.) to their pets. Household dogs, part of the family, loved by the children; hard and fast line of separation impossible.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/mark-7.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

answered and said. See notes on Deuteronomy 1:41 and on Matthew 15:26, &c.

Lord. App-98. B.

under the table. A Divine supplement, here.

children"s. See App-108. Not the same word as in Mark 7:27.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/mark-7.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And she answered and said unto him, Yes, Lord: yet the dogs under the table eat of the children's crumbs.

And she answered and said unto him, Yes, Lord - or, as the same word nai (Greek #3483)] is rendered in Matthew 15:27, "Truth, Lord"

Yet the dogs eat of the children's crumbs - "which fall from their master's table" (Matt.) 'I thank Thee, O blessed One, for that word! That's my whole case. Not of the children? True. A dog? True also: Yet the dogs under the table are allowed to eat of the children's crumbs-the droppings from their master's full table: Give me that, and I am content: One crumb of power and grace from Thy table shall cast the devil out of my daughter.' O what lightning quickness, what reach of instinctive ingenuity, do we behold in this pagan woman!


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/mark-7.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(28) Eat of the children’s crumbs.—The form varies slightly from St. Matthew’s “the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table,” and has, perhaps, a certain vividness of antithesis.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/mark-7.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And she answered and said unto him, Yes, Lord: yet the dogs under the table eat of the children's crumbs.
yet
Psalms 145:16; Isaiah 45:22; 49:6; Matthew 5:45; Luke 7:6-8; 15:30-32; Acts 11:17,18; Romans 3:29; 10:12; 15:8,9; Ephesians 2:12-14; 3:8

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Mark 7:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/mark-7.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Saturday, November 16th, 2019
the Week of Proper 27 / Ordinary 32
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