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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 17:17

A friend loves at all times, And a brother is born for adversity.


Adam Clarke Commentary

A friend loveth at all times - Equally in adversity as in prosperity. And a brother, according to the ties and interests of consanguinity, is born to support and comfort a brother in distress.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Some take the proverb to describe (as in Proverbs 18:24) the “friend that sticketh closer than a brother:” and render: At all times, a friend loveth, but in adversity he is born (i. e., becomes) a brother.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-17.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 17:17

A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.

The unrivalled Friend

Few men enjoy from others the highest and truest form of friendship. There is, however, a higher friendship among men of principle, among men of virtue. Where godliness builds her house, true friendship finds a rest. Take this text and refer it to the Lord Jesus Christ.

I. The endurance of the love of Jesus Christ. He loved before time began. He loved you when time began with you. Since that day this Friend has loved us at all times. Consider the reality of Christ’s love at all times. His love has never been a thing of mere words and pretensions. Consider the nature of the love of Christ, as accounting for its endurance and reality. His love sprang from the purest possible motives. Christ’s love was a wise love, not blind as ours often is. He loved us knowing exactly what we were whom He loved. His love is associated continually with an infinite degree of patience and pity. He is so constant in His love, because He sees us as what we are to be. He is described as “born for adversity,” the adversity of the fall, and of tribulation.

II. Refer the text to the Christian. You have found Jesus Christ to be a true brother and a blessed friend; now let the same be true of you. If Christ be such a friend to us, what manner of people ought we to be towards Him? We should be friends that love Christ at all times. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

A brother born for adversity

I. Adversity is the common lot of brotherhood. It comes sooner or later to all of us. It is a necessity of our nature. It is a wise appointment of God.

II. The ties of brotherhood are formed for adversity. We are united in families for purposes of mutual succour.

III. adversity tends to sanctify the intercourse of the brotherhood. Some of the most valuable of our lessons are taught us in our intercourse with one another.

IV. In adversity we are led to know, in an especial manner, the presence of the elder brother with the brotherhood. Jesus became a brother in adversity. His sufferings and sorrows enabled Him to sympathise with us in all our struggles and troubles.

V. It is by adversity that the whole brotherhood are gathered at last into our Father’s house above. (Anon.)

Men’s friendship and Christ’s

Friendship is no fiction; all history bears record to its reality. There are many relationships in this world dignified by the name of friendship which really do not deserve it, as, for example, acquaintanceship, the freedom to interchange visits of courtesy, and association in business. These pass for friendship; but they are only its shadows. The perfect friendship is a very exacting relation.

1. The first value of friendship is that it will give support in weakness, understanding amid evil reports, consolation in sorrow, and help in the bearing of burdens; and that is no friendship which breaks down under such demands. Trouble is a splendid thing for any man if it only sifts his friends; it saves him a deal of trouble in other ways. There is an admirable compensation about our existence.

2. The second service of a friend is that he is one to whom all our thoughts may be uttered, one to whom we may be absolutely sincere. Ordinarily, a man is only honest when he is alone; let another man come in, and hypocrisy begins. Our words are a kind of clothes to hide our real selves. But with a friend we are absolutely open; we do all our thinking aloud, we stand erect before him, and find in his mind a true picture of what we are. Such a friend is a masterpiece of nature.

3. A third service is that it affords us the possession of one soul to whom we may be tender without shame. See the tenderness between David and Jonathan, and between Achilles and Patroclus. When one man becomes dear to another they have both reached the goal of fortune. By a tender friendship the Divine part in us finds exercise.

4. The fourth service which friendship renders is that it helps us to know ourselves and to know God. When you enjoy friendship most it is in contrast to solitude, and you seek solitude again, in order to know what you have gained from your friend. You cannot reckon up a profit and loss account while you are in his company; you have to retire to your own soul’s communion in order to ascertain your gain and loss thereby. Thus you have a compensation for intercourse with another soul by introspection of your own. Further, as the power that keeps the atoms together in one body is of God, the tie between your friend’s heart and your own is of God, and you cannot let your consciousness of friendship deepen without deepening at the same time your consciousness of God. (H. H. Snell.)

Friendship in adversity

Love, while it remains essentially the same, appears tenfold more loving when its object has fallen from prosperity into poverty; as a lamp burning in daylight shines much more brightly in the darkness. Many will court you while you have much to give; when you need to receive, the number of your friends will be diminished, but their quality will be improved. Your misfortune, like a blast of wind upon the thrashed corn, will drive the chaff away, but the wheat will remain where it was. How very sweet sometimes is the human friendship that remains when sore adversity has sifted it! (W. Arnot, D. D.)

Friendship

The more we understand the world the better we comprehend the Bible. The Spirit that overshadowed its writers knew all the ins and outs of human hearts, all the mysteries of human guilt and grief.

I. The ideal of friendship. Every man cannot be a friend. Friendships cannot be willed, they must be made. They grow; they want resemblances. Earthly friendships have often some element of weakness in them. No man can know more of his brother without knowing the worst as well as the best of him. Friendship with Christ alone satisfies. Here is--

1. The test of friendship. “At all times.” True only of Christ.

2. The preciousness of friendship.

3. The future of friendship.

II. The ideal of brotherhood. “A brother is born for adversity.”

1. This is a unique fact.

2. It is a designed fact.

3. It is an adapted fact.

To be a true brother, Christ must take account of the world as it is, and what word is there more expressive of life than this, “adverse things”--things that turn against us! (W. M. Statham.)

Constancy in friendship

That is not true friendship which is not constant; it will be so if it be sincere and actuated by a good principle. Those that are fanciful and selfish in their friendship will love no longer than their humour is pleased and their interest served, and therefore their affections turn with the wind, and change with the weather. Swallow-friends, that fly to you in summer, but are gone in winter; such friends there is no loss of. But if the friendship be prudent, generous, and cordial, if I love my friend because he is wise, and virtuous, and good, so long as he continues so, though he fall into poverty and disgrace, still I shall love him. (Matthew Henry.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 17:17". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-17.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"A friend loveth at all times; And a brother is born for adversity."

"A friend is friendly at all times; but a brother is born for adversity."[28] "The meaning here is that in trouble one finds out what families are for, and you also find out who are your real friends. The next verse shows that a real friend may be imposed upon."[29]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

A friend loveth at all times,.... A true, hearty, faithful friend, loves in times of adversity as well as in times of prosperity: there are many that are friends to persons, while they are in affluent circumstances; but when there is a change in their condition, and they are stripped of all riches and substance; than their friends forsake them, and stand at a distance from them; as was the case of Job, Job 19:14; it is a very rare thing to find a friend that is a constant lover, such an one as here described;

and a brother is born for adversity; for a time of adversity, as Jarchi: he is born into the world for this purpose; to sympathize with his brother in distress, to relieve him, comfort and support him; and if he does not do this, when it is in his power to do it, he does not answer the end of his being born into the world. The Jewish writers understand this as showing the difference between a friend and a brother: a cordial friend loves at all times, prosperous and adverse; but a "brother loves when adversity is born"F19ואח לצרה יולד "et fater diligit quando tribulatio nascitur", Munster; so some in Vatablus. , or is, so Aben Ezra; he loves when he is forced to it; when the distress of his brother, who is his flesh and bone, as Gersom observes, obliges him to it: but this may be understood of the same person who is the friend; he is a brother, and acts the part of one in a time of adversity, for which he is born and brought into the world; it being so ordered by divine Providence, that a man should have a friend born against the time he stands in need of himF20"Nihil homini amico est opportuno amicus", Plauti Epidicus, Act. 3. Sc. 3. v. 43. . To no one person can all this be applied with so much truth and exactness as to our Lord Jesus Christ; he is a "friend", not of angels only, but of men; more especially of his church and people; of sinful men, of publicans and sinners; as appears by his calling them to repentance, by his receiving them, and by his coming into the world to save them: he "loves" them, and loves them constantly; he loved them before time; so early were they on his heart and in his book of life; so early was he the surety of them, and the covenant of grace made with him; and their persons and grace put into his hands, which he took the care of: he loved them in time, and before time began with them; thus they were preserved in him, when they fell in Adam; were redeemed by his precious blood, when as yet they were not in being, at least many of them: he loves them as soon as time begins with them, as soon as born; though impure by their first birth, transgressors from the womb, enemies and enmity itself unto him; he waits to be gracious to them, and sends his Gospel and his Spirit to find them out and call them: and he continues to love them after conversion; in times of backsliding; in times of desertion; in times of temptation, and in times of affliction: he loves them indeed to the end of time, and to all eternity; nor is there a moment of time to be fixed upon, in which he does not love them. And he is a "brother" to his people; through his incarnation, he is a partaker of the same flesh and blood with them; and through their adoption, they having one and the same Father; nor is he ashamed to own the relation; and he has all the freedom, affection, compassion, and condescension, of a brother in him: and now he is a brother "born"; see Isaiah 9:6; born of a woman, a virgin, at Bethlehem, in the fulness of time, for and on the behalf of his people; even "for adversity"; to bear and endure adversity himself, which he did, by coming into a state of meanness and poverty; through the reproaches and persecutions of men, the temptations of Satan, the ill usage of his own disciples, the desertion of his father, the strokes of justice, and the sufferings of death; also for the adversity of his people, to sympathize with them, bear them up under it, and deliver them out of it. The ancient Jews had a notion that this Scripture has some respect to the Messiah; for, to show that the Messiah, being God, would by his incarnation become a brother to men, they cite this passage of Scripture as a testimony of itF21Mechilta spud Galatin. Cathol. Ver. Arcan. l. 3. c. 28. .


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-17.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

A friend loveth at all times, and a h brother is born for adversity.

(h) So that he is more than a friend, even a brother that helps in time of adversity.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/proverbs-17.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

To the second of these parallel clauses, there is an accession of meaning, that is, that a brother‘s love is specially seen in adversity.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-17.html. 1871-8.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

This intimates the strength of those bonds by which we are bound to each other and which we ought to be sensible of. 1. Friends must be constant to each other at all times. That is not true friendship which is not constant; it will be so if it be sincere, and actuated by a good principle. Those that are fanciful or selfish in their friendship will love no longer than their humour is pleased and their interest served, and therefore their affections turn with the wind and change with the weather. Swallow-friends, that fly to you in summer, but are gone in winter; such friends there is no loss of. But if the friendship be prudent, generous, and cordial, if I love my friend because he is wise, and virtuous, and good, as long as he continues so, though he fall into poverty and disgrace, still I shall love him. Christ is a friend that loves at all times (John 13:1) and we must so love him, Romans 8:35. 2. Relations must in a special manner be careful and tender of one another in affliction: A brother is born to succour a brother or sister in distress, to whom he is joined so closely by nature that he may the more sensibly feel from their burdens, and be the more strongly inclined and engaged, as it were by instinct, to help them. We must often consider what we were born for, not only as men, but as in such a station and relation. Who knows but we came into such a family for such a time as this? We do not answer the end of our relations if we do not do the duty of them. Some take it thus: A friend that loves at all times is born (that is, becomes) a brother in adversity, and is so to be valued.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-17.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

No change of outward circumstances should abate our affection for our friends or relatives. But no friend, except Christ, deserves unlimited confidence. In Him this text did receive, and still receives its most glorious fulfilment.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-17.html. 1706.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.

Was born — Was sent into the world for this, that he might comfort and relieve his brother in adversity.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-17.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 17:17 A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.

Ver. 17. A friend loveth at all times.] Such a friend was Jonathan; Hushai the Archite; Ittai the Gittite, who stuck close to David when he was at his lowest point. But such faithful friends are in this age all for the most part gone in pilgrimage, as he (a) once said, and their return is uncertain. David met with others, besides those above mentioned, that would be the causes, but not the companions, of his calamity - that would fawn upon him in his flourish, but forsake him in his trouble. "My lovers and friends stand aloof," &c. The ancients pictured Friendship in the shape of a fair young man, bare-headed, meanly appareled, having on the outside of his garment written, ‘To live and to die with you,’ and on his forehead, Summer and winter. His breast was open, so that his heart might be seen; and with his finger he pointed to his heart, where was written, Longe, prope - Far and near.

And a brother is born for adversity.] Birth binds him to it; (b) and although at other times fratrum concordia rara, brethren may jar and jangle, yet at a straight and in a stress, good-nature will work, and good blood will not belie itself. And as in the natural, so in the spiritual brotherhood, misery breeds unity. Ridley and Hooper, that when they were both bishops, differed so much about ceremonies, could agree well enough, and be mutual comforts one to another, when they were both prisoners. Esther concealed her kindred in hard times; but God’s people cannot. Moses must rescue his beaten brother out of the hand of the Egyptian, though he venture his life by it.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-17.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 17. A friend loveth at all times, the good will among comrades being constant always, ever on the same level, and a brother is born for adversity, or, but the brother is born of adversity, for it is at such times that friendship and the proper brotherly relation receive their test.


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Bibliography
Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-17.html. 1921-23.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 17:17. A friend loveth at all times, &c.— This may be rendered; A friend loveth at all times; but he is a brother in the day of adversity. A good friend on certain occasions is better, and will do more, than a brother or a parent. See chap. Proverbs 18:24. We may read, And becomes a brother in adversity.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-17.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

A friend, a sincere and hearty friend, loveth at all times, not only in prosperity, but also in adversity, when false friends forsake us.

A brother, who is so not only by name and blood, but by brotherly affection,

is born for adversity; was sent into the world for this among other ends, that he might comfort and relieve his brother in his adversity. So this proverb compareth a friend with a brother, and showeth that a friend doth that freely, and by choice, which a brother doth by the force and obligations of nature. But this last clause may be, and is by divers, otherwise rendered, and he (to wit, the friend) is born a brother (or, becomes or is made a brother, i.e. puts on brotherly affection, as if he had received a second birth, and was born his brother; such expressions being not unusual, both in Scripture and in other authors) in or against the time of adversity. So the sense is, He is a friend at all times, but in adversity he is more than all ordinary friend, even a brother.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-17.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

17. A friend… brother — The critics differ as to the sense of the latter part of this verse. One interpretation is: A brother, according to the ties and interests of consanguinity, is born to support and comfort a brother in distress, (so Clarke, Stuart, Conant, etc.;) that is, in distress a blood relation is in general more to be relied upon than any other friend. Another interpretation is: A true friend (the same as mentioned in a preceding clause) is as a born brother in adversity; that is, the true friend becomes a brother in the time of adversity. So, substantially, the Speaker’s Commentary, Zockler, and others. This last interpretation tacitly assumes that the “brother” is the natural friend in adversity, inasmuch as it advances the “friend” to the relation of brother, because of his kindness in distress. Miller says, “At all times the ‘friend’ loves, and a ‘brother’ is born for straitness;” and interprets in his allegorizing way thus: “The friend is God, the brother is Christ,” “A faithful friend is the medicine of life.”


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-17.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 17:17. A friend loveth at all times — A sincere and hearty friend not only loves in prosperity, but also in adversity, when false friends forsake us; and a brother — Who is so, not only by name and blood, but by brotherly affection; is born for adversity — Was sent into the world for this among other ends, that he might comfort and relieve his brother in his adversity.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-17.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Distress. Like the real friend, chap. xviii. 24.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-17.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

loveth at all times. Illustrations: Abraham (Genesis 14:14. Compare Proverbs 13:11); Joseph (Genesis 45:5; Genesis 50:21); Moses (Exodus 32:11-13. Deuteronomy 9:18, Deuteronomy 9:25-29. Compare Acts 7:40); Jonathan (1 Samuel 20:33); Barzillai (2 Samuel 19:32); Ahikam (Jeremiah 26:24); Ebed-melech (Jeremiah 38:7); Paul (Philemon 1:12, Philemon 1:20); Barnabas (Acts 9:27); Aristarchus (Acts 19:29; Acts 20:4; Acts 27:2. Philemon 1:24. Colossians 4:10); Luke (2 Timothy 4:11); Epaphroditus (Philippians 1:2, Philippians 1:26).


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.

A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity. A true friend loves at all times; but it is in adversity especially that he becomes as a brother born to you, or a brother by blood just born for the emergency. It is when put in the fire that the gold is proved. There ought to be no intervals of forgetfulness or alienation in the true friend. Proverbs 18:24 goes still further than this verse: it tells of "a friend that sticketh closer than a brother."


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(17) A friend loveth at all times . . .—Rather, The (true) friend loveth at all times, and (as) a brother is born for adversity.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.
18:24; 19:7; Ruth 1:16; 1 Samuel 18:3; 19:2; 20:17; 23:16; 2 Samuel 1:26; 9:1-13; Esther 4:14; John 15:13,14; Hebrews 2:11

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-17.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Proverbs 17:17

"A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for adversity." Proverbs 17:17

If I may use the expression, we do not need a dead, but a living Jesus; not an absent, but a present Jesus; not a once, but a now Jesus; we need a friend at the right hand of God at the present moment; an omniscient, omnipresent, omnipotent and yet pitiful and loving Mediator between God and us; an interceding High Priest, Surety, and Representative in our nature in the courts of heaven, who can show mercy and compassion to us now upon earth—"Whose heart is made of tenderness, Whose affections melt with love."

Our needs make us feel this. Our sins and sorrows give us perpetual errands to the throne. This valley of tears is ever before our eyes, and thorns and briars are perpetually springing up in it, that rend and tear our flesh. We need a real friend. Have you not sometimes tossed to and fro upon your weary couch, and almost cried aloud, "O that I had a friend!" You may have received cruel blows from one whom you regarded as a real friend; but you have been cruelly deceived. You feel now you have no one to take care of you or love you, and whom you can love again; and your heart sighs for a friend who shall be a friend indeed. The widow, the orphan, the friendless, the deserted one, all keenly and deeply feel this. But if grace has touched your heart, you feel that though all men forsake you, there is the Friend of sinners, a Brother born for adversity, a Friend who loves at all times, who will never leave or forsake you.

But we need this friend to be almighty, for no other can suit our case—he must be a divine Friend. For who but God can see us wherever we are? What but a divine eye can read our thoughts? What but a divine ear can hear our petitions? And what but a divine hand can stretch itself forth and deliver? Thus the Deity of Christ is no dry, barren speculation, no mere Bible truth, but an experience wrought powerfully into a believer"s inmost soul. Happy soul! happy season! when you can say with the Church, "This is my beloved, and this is my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem" ( Song of Solomon 5:16).

Thus the very needs of the soul instinctively teach us that a friend, to be a friend, must be a heavenly friend; that his heart and hand must be divine, or they are not the heart and hand for us. This Friend, whose bitterest reproach on earth that he "was the Friend of sinners," is his highest glory in heaven, is the blessed Jesus, our great High Priest in the courts above. We find him at times to be very merciful, very pitiful, and very compassionate. And I am sure that we need all the compassion of his loving breast; for we are continually in states of mind when nothing but his pure mercy can suit, when nothing but his rich and boundless compassion is adapted to our case.


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Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Proverbs 17:17". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/proverbs-17.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Tuesday, October 20th, 2020
the Week of Proper 24 / Ordinary 29
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