Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 20:1

Wine is a mocker, strong drink a brawler, And whoever is intoxicated by it is not wise.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Abomination;   Drunkenness;   Wine;   Thompson Chain Reference - Drink, Strong;   Drunkenness;   Intemperance;   Intoxication;   Temperance;   Temperance-Intemperance;   Wine;   The Topic Concordance - Drunkenness;   Mockery;   Wisdom;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Drunkenness;   Wine;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Drunkenness;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Grapes;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Drunkenness;   Pardon;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Drink, Strong;   Wine;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Proverbs, Book of;   Wisdom and Wise Men;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Wine and Strong Drink;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Wine;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Drink, Strong;   Drunkenness;   Err;   Liquor;   Mock;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Asmodeus;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Wine is a mocker - It deceives by its fragrance, intoxicates by its strength, and renders the intoxicated ridiculous.

Strong drink - שכר shechar, any strong fermented liquor, whether of the vine, date, or palm species.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-20.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

“Wine” and “strong drink” are personified as themselves doing what they make men do. The latter (see Leviticus 10:9 note) is here, probably, the “palm-wine” of Syria.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-20.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 20:1

Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.

The evil effects of drunkenness

I. It deadens every moral sensibility. And what is the evidence of the drunkard himself? On his own declaration, are the principles of virtue as vigorous in his heart now as before? Is he as sensible of delight in contemplating the morally sublime, as much shocked with the morally deformed, as much grieved and disgusted with the depraved and licentious?

II. It impairs every intellectual faculty.

III. It accelerates death.

IV. It entails misery on families.

V. It terminates in everlasting destruction (1 Corinthians 6:10). (The Weekly Christian Teacher.)

Strong drink deceptive

The characteristic of strong drink is deceitfulness,

1. A great quantity of precious food is destroyed that strong drink may be extracted from the rubbish.

2. The curative and strengthening properties of our strong drinks, which are so much vaunted, are in reality next to nothing.

3. Strong drink deceives the nation by the vast amount of revenue that it pours into the public treasury.

4. In as far as human friendship is, in any case, dependent on artificial stimulant for the degree of its fervency, it is a worthless counterfeit.

5. Its chief deception lies in the silent, stealthy advances which it makes upon the unsuspecting taster, followed, when the secret approaches have been carried to a certain point, by the sure spring and deathly grip of the raging lion. (W. Arnot, D. D.)

Mischief and folly of drunkenness

I. The mischief. To the sinner himself. It mocks him, makes a fool of him, promises him that satisfaction which it can never give him. In reflection upon it: it rages in his conscience. It is raging in the body, putting the humours into a ferment. Pretending to be a sociable thing, it renders men unfit for society, for it makes them abusive with their tongues and outrageous in their passions.

II. The folly. He that is deceived thereby, that suffers himself to be drawn into this sin, when he is so plainly warned of the consequences of it, is not wise: he shows that he has no right sense or consideration of things; and not only so, but he renders himself incapable of getting wisdom; for it is a sin that infatuates and besets men and takes away their heart. (Matthew Henry.)

Total abstinence

The following story is told of General Harrison, one of the candidates for the Presidency of the United States, in connection with a public dinner given him on one occasion: “At the close of the dinner one of the gentlemen drank his health. The General pledged his toast by drinking water. Another gentleman offered a toast, and said, ‘General, will you not favour me by taking s glass of wine?’ The General, in a very gentlemanly way, begged to be excused. He was again urged to join in a glass of wine. This was too much. He rose from his seat and said in the most dignified manner: ‘Gentlemen, I have twice refused to partake of the wine-cup. I hope that will be sufficient. Though you press the matter ever so much, not a drop shall pass my lips. I made a resolve when I started in life that I would avoid strong drink. That vow I have never broken. I am one of a class of seventeen young men who graduated together. The other sixteen members of my class now fill drunkards’ graves, and all from the pernicious habit of wine-drinking. I owe all my health, my happiness, and prosperity to that resolution. Would you urge me to break it now?’”

Better sink than drink

A clergyman complained to the late Sir Andrew Clark of feeling low and depressed, unable to face his work, and tempted to rely on stimulants. Sir Andrew saw that the position was a perilous one, and that it was a crisis in the man’s life. He dealt with the case, and forbade resort to stimulants, when the patient declared that he would be unequal to his work, and ready to sink. “Then,” said Sir Andrew, “sink like a man.”

Abstinence favourable to health

The working man’s capital is health, not wealth. It does not consist in landed property, but in sinew and muscle; and if he persist in the use of intoxicating liquors they will strike at the very root of his capital--a sound physical constitution. After this is lost he becomes unfit for the workshop, for no master will employ a man who wants capital. He has then to repair to the poorhouse or infirmary. (J. Hunter.)

Water the best drink

“The best of all drinks for the athlete,” says Dr. Richardson, “is pure water. The athletic lower animals--the racehorse, the hound, the lion, the leopard--thrive well on water, because their bodies, like our own, are water engines, as steam engines are, and that, too, almost as simply and purely.”

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 20:1". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-20.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Proverbs 20:1

"Wine is a mocker, strong drink a brawler; And whosoever erreth thereby is not wise."

Alcoholic beverages are today ruining America. It is not only unwise to err in the use of them, but it is sinful also. Yes, Jesus used wine. It had a 4 percent alcoholic content, and even then was, in all probability diluted. See pp. 102,103 in my commentary on Proverbs. The high-powered wine marketed today has up to 18 percent alcoholic content. Nothing is any more misleading than the allegation (true enough) that Jesus made eighty gallons of wine at the wedding in Cana; because that stuff which Gallo makes today is nearly five times as powerful.

Oh, but how about beer? The Anchor Bible renders this verse as: "Wine makes men insolent; beer makes them boisterous; no one who staggers drunkenly is wise."[1] The myth that the government cannot limit the use of this poison as a beverage is, of course, false. The Arabian countries can and do prohibit it.

The silliest thing that this writer has witnessed in his eighty-eight years of life is the hysterical efforts of the government to prohibit smoking, while at the same time actually encouraging the consumption of alcohol, which is a hundred times more dangerous. Yes, if a man smokes a pack of cigarettes every day for twenty years, he may get lung cancer; but, not long ago, in Houston, Texas, a teen-aged driver had a few beers at a party, loaded his car up with friends, hit a bridge column and killed five of them, not in twenty-years, but in one afternoon! Fifty thousand funerals a year, besides billions of dollars in damage, is too high a price to pay for the palaces of the liquor barons. God help America to wake up!

Let it be noted here that nothing is said about "excess drinking." It is drinking which is condemned. The very nature of alcohol is such that any consumption of it almost invariably leads to excess. Paul's instructions to Timothy to, "Drink no longer water, but a little wine for thy stomach's sake" (1 Timothy 5:23) did not mean that Timothy would never drink any more water, but that he would stop being a teetotaler. And regardless of what some social-drinking Christians think about it, the true and holy standard of Christian living is simply: "Don't touch alcoholic beverages, except as a medicinal requirement." The apostle to the Gentiles made this perfectly clear.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-20.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging,.... Wine deceives a man; it not only overcomes him before he is aware, but it promises him a pleasure which it does not give; but, on the contrary, excessive drinking gives him pain, and so mocks him; yea, it exposes him to reproach and disgrace, and to the mockery and derision of others; as well as it sets him to scoff at his companions, and even to mock at religion, and all that is good and serious; see Hosea 7:5; and strong drink not only disturbs the brain, and puts the spirits in a ferment, so that a man rages within, but it sets him a raving and quarrelling with his company, and everybody he meets with; such generally get into broils and contentions, and get woe, sorrow, and wounds, Proverbs 23:29. Aben Ezra gives this as the sense of the words,

"a man of wine'

(that is, one that is given to wine, a wine bibber), so Ben Melech,

"is a mocker, and he cries out for strong drink, that it may be given him;'

which is not a bad sense of the words.

and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise; whosoever gives himself to it, is not on his guard against it, but is overcome by it, does not act a wise but an unwise part: wine besots as well as deceives men. This may be applied to the wine of fornication, or to the false doctrine and superstition of the church of Rome; with which the nations of the earth are deceived and made drunk, and which puts them upon blaspheming God, deriding his people, and using cruelty to them, Revelation 17:2.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-20.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

a Wine [is] a mocker, strong drink [is] raging: and whoever is deceived by it is not wise.

(a) By wine here is meant him that is given to wine, and so by strong drink.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/proverbs-20.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

mocker — scorner. Such men are made by wine.

strong drink — made by spicing wine (compare Isaiah 5:11, Isaiah 5:22); and it may include wine.

raging — or boisterous as a drunkard.

deceived — literally, “erring,” or reeling.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-20.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

This proverb warns against the debauchery with which free-thinking is intimately associated.

Wine is a mocker, mead boisterous;

And no one who is overtaken thereby is wise.

The article stands with יין . Ewald maintains that in 10:1-22:6 the article occurs only here and at Proverbs 21:31, and that it is here, as the lxx shows, not original. Both statements are incorrect. The article is found, e.g., at Proverbs 19:6; Proverbs 18:18, Proverbs 18:17, and here the personification of “wine” requires it; but that it is wanting to שׁכר shows how little poetry delights in it; it stands once for twice. The effects of wine and mead ( שׁכר from שׁכר, to stop, obstruct, become stupid) are attributed to these liquors themselves as their property. Wine is a mocker, because he who is intoxicated with it readily scoffs at that which is holy; mead is boisterous (cf. הומיּה, Proverbs 7:11), because he who is inebriated in his dissolute madness breaks through the limits of morality and propriety. He is unwise who, through wine and the like, i.e., overpowered by it (cf. 2 Samuel 13:28), staggers, i.e., he gives himself up to wine to such a degree that he is no longer master of himself. At Proverbs 5:19 we read, שׁגה ב, of the intoxication of love; here, as at Isaiah 28:7, of the intoxication of wine, i.e., of the passionate slavish desire of wine or for wine. The word “ Erpicht ” [ avidissimus ], i.e., being indissolubly bound to a thing, corresponds at least in some degree to the idea. Fleischer compares the French: être fou de quelque chose . Isaiah 28:7, however, shows that one has to think on actual staggering, being overtaken in wine.

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Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-20.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Here is, 1. The mischief of drunkenness: Wine is a mocker; strong drink is raging. It is so to the sinner himself; it mocks him, makes a fool of him, promises him that satisfaction which it can never give him. It smiles upon him at first, but at the last it bites. In reflection upon it, it rages in his conscience. It is raging in the body, puts the humours into a ferment. When the wine is in the wit is out, and then the man, according as his natural temper is, either mocks like a fool or rages like a madman. Drunkenness, which pretends to be a sociable thing, renders men unfit for society, for it makes them abusive with their tongues and outrageous in their passions, Proverbs 23:29. 2. The folly of drunkards is easily inferred thence. He that is deceived thereby, that suffers himself to be drawn into this sin when he is so plainly warned of the consequences of it, is not wise; he shows that he has no right sense or consideration of things; and not only so, but he renders himself incapable of getting wisdom; for it is a sin that infatuates and besots men, and takes away their heart. A drunkard is a fool, and a fool he is likely to be.

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Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-20.html. 1706.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.

A mocker — Wine immoderately drunk makes men mockers.

Raging — Makes men full of rage.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-20.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 20:1 Wine [is] a mocker, strong drink [is] raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.

Ver. 1. Wine is a mocker, &c.] For, first, it mocks (a) the drunkard, and makes a fool of him, promising him pleasure, but paying him with the stinging of an adder, and biting of a cockatrice, Proverbs 23:32. {See Trapp on "Proverbs 23:32"} Wine is a comfortable creature, [ 9:12] one of the chief lenitives (b) of human miseries, as Plato calls it; but "excess of wine" [1 Peter 4:3] (c) is, as one well saith, Blandus daemon, dulce venenum, suave Teccatum; quam qui in se habet, se non habet; quam qui facit, non facit peccatum, sed totus est peccatum. That is, a fair spoken devil, a sweet poison, a sin which he that hath in him, hath not himself, and which he that runs into, runs not into a single sin, but is wholly turned into sin. Secondly, It renders a man a mocker, even one of those scorners, for whom judgments are prepared, as Solomon had said in the foregoing verse. See Hosea 7:5, Isaiah 28:1, 1 Samuel 25:36-38 Abigail would not tell Nabal of his danger till he had slept out his drunkenness, lest she should have met with a mock, if not with a knock.

Strong drink is raging.] All kinds of drink that will alienate the understanding of a man and make him drunk, as ale, beer, cider, perry, metheglin, &c. Of this Pliny (d) cries out, Hei, mira vitiorum solertia inventum est quemadmodum aqua quoque inebriaret. Portentosum sane potionis genus! quasi non ad alium usum natura parens humane generi fruges dedisse videatur. So witty is wickedness grown now, that there is a way invented to make a man drunk with water; a monstrous kind of drink surely! as if dame Nature had bestowed grain upon us to such a base abuse. {See Trapp on "Proverbs 23:29"} St Paul very fitly yoketh together drunkards and railers. [1 Corinthians 6:9]

And whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.] For when the wine is in the wit is out. They have a practice of drinking the Outs, as they call it - all the wit out of the head, all the money out of the purse, &c. - and thereby affect the title of roaring boys, by a woeful prolepsis (doubtless), here for hereafter.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-20.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 1. Wine is a mocker, excessive indulgence in it produces scorn and blasphemy in the drinker, strong drink is raging, it robs a man of clear thinking and proper self-possession; and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise, that is, if he is led astray thereby, so that he reels and staggers under its influence, he shows the lack of wisdom and will never attain to true wisdom.

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Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-20.html. 1921-23.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 20:1. Strong drink is raging The first precept in this chapter is against drunkenness, as an enemy to wisdom even in common things, much more in those of everlasting concernment; for that commonly expels out of men's minds all reverence both to God and to others; inclining them to say or do any thing without restraint or discretion. And what unruly passions it excites when the brain is disturbed with it, is universally known. The word המה homeh, here translated raging, includes them all: it signifies that discomposed, unquiet, and restless state of mind, which expresses itself in wild and tumultuous motions. See Bishop Patrick and Schultens.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-20.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PROVERBS CHAPTER 20

Wine is a mocker; wine immoderately drunk makes men mockers or scoffers at God and men. Compare Hosea 7:5.

Strong drink is raging; makes men full of rage and passion.

Is not wise; is a fool, or a madman, because he depriveth himself of the use of his reason.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-20.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1.A mocker , (lets.) Of this word Gesenius says, that it means a frivolous and impudent person, who sets at naught and scoffs at the most sacred precepts and duties of religion, piety, and morals.

Strong drink , (shekhar,) Greek, sikera. Jerome says, that in Hebrew any inebriating liquor is called shekhar, whether made of grain, the juice of apples, honey, dates, or any other fruit. It is probably used here in a more generic sense than , (yayin,) wine: meaning any kind of intoxicating drink. Of “strong drink,” is predicated , (homeh,) turbulence: to be noisy, clamorous, boisterous; to be in a tumult or uproar. Taking the above together, they are highly descriptive of drunkenness.

Stuart says, The common idea that “strong drink, in the Scriptures, means something stronger than wine, is destitute of any good foundation. None of the fruits yielded a juice so intoxicating as that of the grape. Wine was the strongest drink of the Hebrews, if the drinks that were drugged be excepted.” (See note on Proverbs 9:2.)

Inebriating liquors, whether wine or anything else, are “mockers,” deceivers. They deceive those who drink them, leading imperceptibly, in many cases, to habits of tippling and drunkenness, and make those who indulge in them setters at naught of all duties and obligations.

Whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise — Or, shall not become wise. “When wine is in, wit is out.” Strong drink is an enemy to wisdom even in common things; how much more in those of everlasting moment! It usually expels from the mind all reverence for God and respect for man, and causes men to throw off restraint and lose discretion.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-20.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 20:1. Wine is a mocker — Wine immoderately drank makes men mockers or scoffers at God and men: see Hosea 7:5. Or, is a mocker to the sinner himself, makes a mock of him, deprives him of his understanding, and causes him to speak and act like a fool, and thereby renders him ridiculous, and exposes him to shame, contempt, and insult. Strong drink is raging — Excites unruly passions in men’s minds, and makes them full of rage and fury. “When wine is in,” says one, “wit is out,” and then the man, according as his natural temper is, either mocks like a fool, or rages like a madman. The word המה, here rendered raging, says Bishop Patrick, signifies “that discomposed, unquiet, and restless state of mind which expresses itself in wild and tumultuous motions.” Whosoever is deceived thereby — Namely, by wine or strong drink; is not wise — Is a fool or a madman, because he deprives himself of the use of his reason. Thus, “the first precept in this chapter is against drunkenness, as an enemy to wisdom, even in common things; much more in those of everlasting consequence: for it commonly expels out of men’s minds all reverence, both to God and others, inclining them to take the license to say or do any thing without restraint or discretion.” Therefore, though it pretends to be a sociable thing, it renders men unfit for society, making them abusive with their tongues, and outrageous in their passions.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-20.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

A luxurious thing. Hebrew, "a scoffer." Chaldean, "renders one a scoffer." --- Drunkenness. Hebrew ssocor, any strong drink, particularly palm-wine. Intemperance places the strongest obstacles in the way of wisdom. It causes a person to mock at all sacred things, and to be quarrelsome, chap. xxiii. 29., and Ephesians v. 18.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-20.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Wine. Hebrew. yayin. See App-27.

is. Figure of speech Metaphor. App-6.

mocker = scoffer.

strong drink. Hebrew. shekar. App-27. IV

raging = a brawler.

is deceived = erreth. Hebrew. shagah = to go astray. See note on Proverbs 11:18. Not the same word as in Proverbs 20:17.

is not wise. Illustrations: Noah (Genesis 7:1. Compare Proverbs 9:20, Proverbs 9:21); Nabal (1 Samuel 25:36); Elah (1 Kings 16:8-10); Ben-hadad (1 Kings 20:16-21); Ephraim (Isaiah 28:7); Belshazzar, &c. (Dan 5. Jeremiah 51:39, Jeremiah 51:57); Nineveh (Nahum 1:10); and probably Nadab and Abihu (Leviticus 10:8, Leviticus 10:9),

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.

Wine is a mocker. Wine makes those who drink it mockers of God and of men.

Strong drink (Hebrew, sheekaar (H7941)) is raging - or tumultuously clamorous. It makes its drinkers so. Sheekaar includes every strong drink besides wine (cf. Leviticus 10:9).

And whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise. 'When wine comes in, mind goes out.' It swallows up the reason, dulls the mind, clouds the brain, stirs up the passions.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-20.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XX.

(1) Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging—i.e., producing these effects in those who subject themselves to their power.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.
23:29-35; 31:4; Genesis 9:21-23; 19:31-36; 1 Samuel 25:36-38; 2 Samuel 11:13; 2 Samuel 13:28; 1 Kings 20:16-21; Isaiah 28:7; Hosea 4:11; 7:5; Habakkuk 2:15,16; 1 Corinthians 6:10; Galatians 5:21; Ephesians 5:18
Reciprocal: Genesis 19:33 - drink;  Deuteronomy 21:20 - he is a glutton;  Esther 1:10 - the heart;  Psalm 94:9 - He that planted;  Proverbs 23:20 - not;  Proverbs 23:30 - tarry;  Ecclesiastes 2:3 - yet;  Ecclesiastes 10:16 - and;  Isaiah 5:11 - inflame;  Habakkuk 2:5 - he transgresseth

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-20.html.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

Здесь говорится о том,

(1) какое зло причиняет пьянство. Вино — глумливо, сикера — буйна. Так пьянство поступает с грешником: оно глумится над ним, делает дураком, обещая удовольствие, которого никогда не даст. Вначале оно улыбается ему, а потом кусает. Размышляя о нем, совесть приходит в ярость. Неистовство зарождается в теле, вызывая брожение в духе человека. Когда вино входит в человека, ум покидает его, и тогда человек, соответственно своему природному характеру, либо смеется, как глупец, либо буйствует, как сумасшедший. Пьянство, которому придают вид средства общения, делает людей негодными для общества, так как их язык становится оскорбительным, а страсти – неистовыми (Прит. 23:29).

(2) Отсюда легко сделать вывод о безрассудстве пьянства. Всякий, увлекающийся ими, позволивший себе втянуться в этот грех, когда его так прямо предостерегали от последствий, неразумен. Он показывает, что не имеет ни благоразумия, ни понимания вещей; но не только это – он показывает, что неспособен приобрести мудрость, ибо этот грех сводит с ума и одурманивает людей, отнимая у них сердца. Пьяница – это глупец, и скорее всего он таким и останется.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary
>
>on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-20.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

It seems hard to believe that men of the greatest abilities, as well as the ignorant, should render themselves fools and madmen, merely for the taste or excitement produced by strong liquors.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 20:1". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary
>
>on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-20.html. 1706.