Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 30:26

The shephanim are not mighty people, Yet they make their houses in the rocks;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Animals;   Coney;   Industry;   Riddle;   Thompson Chain Reference - Animals;   Conies;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Rocks;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Coney;   Proverb, the Book of;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Pardon;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Coney;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Proverbs, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Agur;   Coney;   Folk;   Jakeh;   Massa;   Proverb;   Proverbs, Book of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Coney;   Proverbs, Book of;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Coney;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Conie;   Rock;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Coney;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Coney;   Folk;   Hare;   Palestine;   Rock-Badger;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Coney;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Conies - See the marginal reference note.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-30.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The coneys are but a feeble folk,.... Or "rabbits"; though some think these creatures are not intended, because they are not so little as those with which they are ranked, the ant, the locust, and spider; and because of the places in which they burrow and make their houses, which though in holes and caverns of the earth, yet not in rocky but sandy places; rather therefore it is thought that the mountain mouse, or bear mouseF15שפנים οι χοιρογρυλλιοι, Sept. "choerogryllii", Vatablus; "mures montani", Junius & Tremellius, Cartwright; "arctomyes", Schultens. , as Jerom calls it, is meant; of which, he saysF16Epist. ad Sun. & Fretelli, fol. 30, C. tom. 3. , there were great numbers in Palestine, and which had their habitations in the holes of rocks; though if Spain has its name from שפן, as some say, because of the multitudes of coneys in it; and hence that part of Spain called Celtiberia is called by CatullusF17Cuniculosa Celtiberia, Epigram. ad Contubernales, 35. v. 18. Cuniculosa; the coney may be thought to be meant by this word, and so it is translated in Leviticus 11:5; the only places where it is elsewhere used; and the word may be derived either from ספן, to "cover", by a change of the letters ש and ס; or from שוף, which has the signification both of breaking, and of hiding and covering, Genesis 3:15; and this creature breaks the earth and hides itself in itF18Gaudet "in effossis habitare cuniculus antris", Martial. Epigr. l. 13. Ep. 58. ;

yet make they their houses in the rocks; it is usual with other writers to call the receptacles of any creatures, beasts, birds, or insects, their houses so we read of the house of the ant, and of the tortoise and snailF19Phaedri Fab. 37, 80. ; and which, because it carries its house era its back, it is called by CiceroF20De Divinat. l. 2. c. 64. and so by Hesiod and Anaxilas in Athenaei Deipnosoph. l. 2. c. 22. p. 63. "domiporta"; see Psalm 104:17; the coneys make theirs in the rocks, to cure themselves from their more potent enemies; and thus what they want in strength is made up in sagacity, and by their wise conduct they provide for their safety and protection. These are an emblem of the people of God, who are a weak and feeble people, unable of themselves to perform spiritual duties, to exercise grace, to withstand the corruptions of their nature, resist the temptations of Satan, bear up under afflictive providences, and grapple with spiritual enemies, or defend themselves from them: but such heavenly wisdom is given them, as to betake themselves for refuge and shelter to Christ, the Rock of Israel; the Rock of salvation, the Rock that is higher than they; a strong one, on which the church is built, and against which the gates of hell cannot prevail: and here they are safe from the storms of divine wrath, and the avenging justice of God; from the rage and fury of men, and the fiery darts of Satan; here they dwell safely and delightfully, and have all manner of provision at hand for them; they are the inhabitants of that Rock, who have reason to sing indeed! see Isaiah 33:16.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-30.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

conies — mountain mice, or rabbits.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-30.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 30:26 The conies [are but] a feeble folk, yet make they their houses in the rocks;

Ver. 26. The conies are but a feeble folk.] But what they want in strength they have in wisdom; while they work themselves holes and burrows in the earth. Gaudet in effossis habitare cuniculus antris, (a) secures herself in the rocks and stony places. It shall be our wisdom to work ourselves into the rock Christ Jesus, where we shall be safe from hellish hunters.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-30.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 30:26. The conies The mountain-mice—the rock-rats. See Leviticus 11:5.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-30.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

In rocky ground, or in the holes of rocks, for their safety against their too potent enemies.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-30.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

conies. About the size of a rabbit. Inhabit clefts in the rocks; because, having soft feet, they cannot burrow as a rabbit can. So God"s people abide in Christ, their Rock.

houses . . . rocks = house . . . rock. Hebrew singular.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-30.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The conies are but a feeble folk, yet make they their houses in the rocks;

The conies ... feeble ... yet make they their houses in the rocks - not the rabbit, which is not found in Bible lands, but a gregarious pachydermatous animal (Hebrew, shapan (Hebrew #8227)), the hyrax Syriacus, about the size of a rabbit, living in the clefts of the rocks. Not the jerboa, as Bochart thinks, since this inhabits sandy places, not stony rocks. An old male shapan or hyrax is set as sentry near their holes; if danger approach, he utters a whistle to apprise his companions. This illustrate their wisdom, here celebrated (cf. note, Psalms 104:18).

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-30.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) The conies are but a feeble folk, being only about as big as a rabbit, with nails instead of claws, and weak teeth. Its Hebrew name (shâphân) signifies a “hider,” from its habit of living in clefts of the rocks; its scientific name is Hyrax Syriacus. The translation “coney,” i.e., rabbit, is a mistake. In general appearance it resembles a guinea-pig or marmot.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-30.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The conies are but a feeble folk, yet make they their houses in the rocks;
Leviticus 11:5; Psalms 104:18
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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 30:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-30.html.