Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 5:11

And you groan at your final end, When your flesh and your body are consumed;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Adultery;   Harlot (Prostitute);   Lasciviousness;   Remorse;   Temptation;   Women;   Young Men;   The Topic Concordance - Disobedience;   Whoredom;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Flesh;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Prostitution;   Wisdom;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Flesh;   Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times;   Repentance;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Proverbs, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Medicine;   Proverbs, Book of;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Proverbs book of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Flesh;   Wisdom;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Chastity;   Hananiah (ḥ;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

When thy flesh and thy body are consumed - The word שאר shear, which we render body, signifies properly the remains, residue, or remnant of a thing: and is applied here to denote the breathing carcass, putrid with the concomitant disease of debauchery: a public reproach which the justice of God entails on this species of iniquity. The mourning here spoken of is of the most excessive kind: the word נהם naham is often applied to the growling of a lion, and the hoarse incessant murmuring of the sea. In the line of my duty, I have been often called to attend the death-bed of such persons, where groans and shrieks were incessant through the jaculating pains in their bones and flesh. Whoever has witnessed a closing scene like this will at once perceive with what force and propriety the wise man speaks. And How have I hated instruction, and despised the voice of my teachers! is the unavailing cry in that terrific time. Reader, whosoever thou art, lay these things to heart. Do not enter into their sin: once entered, thy return is nearly hopeless.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Yet one more curse is attendant on impurity. Then, as now, disease was the penalty of this sin.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-5.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 5:11

And thou mourn at the last.

Dying regrets

Religion has one undeniable advantage to recommend it--whatever it calls us to sacrifice or to suffer, it always ends well. On the other hand, sin has one undeniable evil to excite our aversion and horror--whatever sensual pleasures and imaginary profit attend its course, it always ends awfully.

I. The subject of these regrets. It is a man who has disregarded through life the means employed to preserve or reclaim him. Man’s instructors and reprovers may be ranked in six classes.

1. Your connections in life. Father, mother, friend, etc.

2. The Scriptures.

3. Ministers.

4. Conscience.

5. Irrational creatures.

6. The dispensations of Providence.

II. The period of these regrets. It is a dying hour.

1. Such a period is unavoidable.

2. It cannot be far off.

3. It may be very near.

4. It is sometimes prematurely brought on by sin. Such a period, if it be not prematurely produced by irreligion, is always embittered by it.

III. The nature of these regrets. This mourning has two attributes to distinguish it.

1. It is dreadful. A dying hour has been called an honest hour.

2. It is useless. To the individuals themselves, whatever it may be to others.

Lessons:

1. How good is God!

2. How fallen is man!

3. How important is serious thought! (William Jay.)

At the last.--

Last things

The wise man saw the young and simple straying into the house of the strange woman. It was not what it seemed to be. Could he shed a revealing light upon it? He saw only one lamp suitable to his purpose; it was named “At the last.” He held this up, and the young man’s delusion was dispelled. He saw in its light the awful consequences of self-indulgence and sin. If this lamp is useful in this one case, it may be useful in others. I can only compare my text in its matchless power to Ithuriel’s spear, with which, according to Milton, he touched the toad, and straightway Satan appeared in his true colours. This lamp has four sides to it.

I. Death is at the last. In some sense it is the last of this mortal life; it is the last of this period of trial here below; it is the last of the day of grace; it is the last of the day of mortal sin. In the light of death look upon mortal sins. The greatest of human actions will appear to be insignificant when we come to die. Look at our selfish actions in this light. How will sin then appear?

II. Judgment is at the last. When we die, we die not. When a man dieth shall he live again? Ay, that he shall--for his spirit dieth never. After death comes the judgment. Look at the past, the present, the future, in the light of that judgment.

III. Heaven is at the last. Look on all our actions in the light of heaven.

IV. Hell is at the last. See things in that dread and dismal light, the glare of the fiery abyss. How will self-indulgence, unbelief, procrastination look in that light? (C. H. Spurgeon.)

When thy flesh and thy body are consumed.--

Sin’s recompense

If all men believed at the beginning of their courses of life what they find at the end, there would be far less power in temptation, and many would turn aside from those paths which bring them to ruin; but it is one of the peculiarities of youth that, while it has unbounded faith in certain directions, it seldom has faith in regard to mischiefs which befall disobedience. There are many reasons which conspire to make men either over-confident in the beginnings of life, or even audacious.

1. The inexperience and thoughtlessness which belong to the young. Thousands there are who have taken no pains in the formation of their consciences.

2. There is a most defiant spirit in the young.

3. There is a hopefulness which frequently goes beyond all bounds.

4. There are reactions from an infelicitous way of teaching which tend to produce presumption in the young. Especially the exaggeration and indiscriminate way in which sin is often held forth. Conventional sins are held up before men as representing sinning, until there comes up a scepticism of the whole doctrine and the whole sad and melancholy experience of sinning.

5. Men are made presumptuous in sinning because they see wicked men prospering. They regard that as the refutation of half the preaching, and of almost all the advice they hear. There is a law of everlasting rectitude. There are conditions on which men’s bodies will serve them happily, and there are conditions on which men’s souls will serve them happily. But if a man violate these conditions, no matter how secretly, no matter how little, just as sure as there is a God in heaven, he must suffer the penalty. Every one of the wrongs which a man commits against his own soul will find him out, and administer its own penalty. There comes a time when men who are not actually worn out by excess of transgression do regain, to some extent, their moral sense. After the period of infatuation there comes, very frequently, a period of retrospection. It is alluded to in the passage now before us. The resurrection of moral sensibility comes through a variety of agencies--failure, shame, affliction, etc. Sometimes it comes too late. I beseech you, young men, believe in virtue; believe in truth; believe in honesty and fidelity; believe in honour; believe in God; believe in God’s law and in God’s providence. Put your trust in God, and in the faith of God, and not in the seeming of deceitful and apparently prosperous men. Whatever else you get, have peace, day by day, with your own conscience. Whoever else you offend, do not offend your God. Do what is right, and then fear no man. (H. W. Beecher.)

The doom of the libertine

I. Waste of wealth. It is spent to garnish the house of sin; it is so much taken from home-scenes, and legitimate pleasures and benevolence.

II. Waste of health. Note the corruption of licentious nations, as the Turks, etc.

III. Waste of tears. Mourning at the last is too late for proving the repentance to be genuine. (Anon.)

A dissolute young man

I. A dissolute young man with a decaying body. The wise man foresaw the wretched physical condition to which the dissolute life of the young man whom he calls his son would lead.

1. It is a sad sight to see a young man decay at all.

2. It is more sad when the physical decay has been produced by a dissolute life.

II. A dissolute young man with an active memory.

1. He remembers the many privileges he has abused.

2. He remembers the sinful scenes of his life.

III. A dissolute young man with a torturing conscience.

1. An agonising sense of self-blamefulness. Conscience casts all excuses to the winds; it fastens the crime home on the individual himself.

2. An agonising sense of self-ruin. The moral wail here breathes the feeling of destruction. (D. Thomas, D. D.)

The woes of wantonness

I. Lamentation follows wantonness.

1. When men find their goods gone and their bodies corrupted.

2. When they see all their opportunities of doing good to soul and body gone.

3. They feel God’s hand heavy on them, as being on the rack of an evil conscience.

II. The end of wanton courses is sorrowful.

1. Because of pleasures past.

2. Because of present sorrows.

3. Because of pursuing pain that is gotten by disease.

4. Because of public shame.

III. The body itself is consumed by wantonness. Because it consumes the radical humour of the body. (Francis Taylor, B. D.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 5:11". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-5.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And thou mourn at the last,.... Or roar as a lion, as the wordF19נהמת "rugies", Pagninus, Montanus, Mercerus, Baynus, Gejerus, Amama, Michaelis. signifies; see Proverbs 19:12; expressing great distress of mind, horror of conscience, and vehement lamentations; and yet not having and exercising true repentance, but declaring a worldly sorrow, which worketh death. This mourning is too late, and not so much on account of the evil of sin as the evil that comes by it; it is when the man could have no pleasure from it and in it; when he has not only lost his substance by it, but his health also, the loss of both which must be very distressing: it is at the end of life, in his last days; in his old age, as the Syriac version, when he can no longer pursue his unclean practices;

when thy flesh and thy body are consumed; either in the time of old age and through it, as Gersom; or rather by diseases which the sin of uncleanness brings upon persons, which affixes the several parts of it; the brain, the blood, the liver, the back, and loins, and reins; and even all the parts of it, expressed by flesh and body. This may express the great tribulation such shall be cast into that commit adultery with the Romish Jezebel, Revelation 2:22.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-5.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

at the last — the end, or reward (compare Proverbs 5:4).

mourn — roar in pain.

flesh and  …  body — the whole person under incurable disease.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-5.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 5:11 And thou mourn at the last, when thy flesh and thy body are consumed,

Ver. 11. And thou mourn at the last.] Heb., And thou roar; as being upon the rack of an evil conscience, and in the suburbs of hell, as it were: while "the just Lord" [Zephaniah 3:5] makes thee, even here, possess the sins of thy youth, and writes bitter things against thee. The word signifies, To roar as a lion, or as the sea, (a) or as the devil doth. For the devils believe and tremble, or roar. [James 2:19] Grecians ascribe the original, φρισσουσι, to the roaring of the sea. (b)

When thy flesh and thy body.] By the word here rendered body, there are those who understand the radical humour, the natural moisture that maintains life, and is much impaired by this sensual sin. (c) Avicenna doubted not to say, that the emission of a little seed more than the body could well bear, was a great deal more hurtful than the loss of forty times so much blood. Gouts, palsies, epilepsies, &c., oft follow upon this sin: but the French disease is the natural fruit of it, such as will stick by men when their best friends forsake them. "Jezebel is cast into a bed, and they that commit adultery with her, into great tribulation." [Revelation 2:20] The Popish libidinous (d) clergy are smitten with ulcers. [Revelation 16:11] Their pope, Paul the Fourth, died ex nimio veneris usu, saith the historian, (e) by wasting his strength in filthy pleasure, as the flame consumeth the candle.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 5:11. And thou mourn at the last When in the decline of life thou shalt be without strength, without vigour, without children, without support, without resource. We must recollect the great desire which the Hebrews had for children and a numerous family, in order fully to conceive the remorse of the man who finds himself, through his own fault, incapacitated from having legitimate children; of a man used to debauchery, and surrounded with the evils which are the natural consequences of intemperance. The wise man here plainly points at that shameful disease, which he does not choose to name, but which has been in all ages the just punishment of the debauched. The writer of Ecclesiasticus has alluded to it, Ch. Proverbs 19:2-3. Calmet.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-5.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thou mourn at the last; bitterly bewail thy own madness and misery when it is too late.

Thy flesh and thy body; thy flesh, even thy body; the particle and being put expositively.

Consumed by those manifold diseases which filthy and inordinate lusts bring upon the body, of which physicians give a very large and sad catalogue, and the bodies of many adulterers give full proof.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

11.Thy flesh and thy body — The original words seem to imply a wasted body — the remnant or remains of thee — what is left after a life of licentious habits, putrid with the diseases which follow debauchery.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-5.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Body. He alludes to a shameful disease, the just punishment of intemperance, Ecclesiasticus xix. 3.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-5.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And thou mourn at the last, when thy flesh and thy body are consumed,

And thou mourn at the last, when thy flesh and thy body are consumed. "At the last" - namely, when the final consequences of thy sin overtake thee: when all the powers of thy body are consumed.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) When thy flesh and thy body are consumed.—Ruin of health has followed ruin of property.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And thou mourn at the last, when thy flesh and thy body are consumed,
thou
7:23; Deuteronomy 32:29; Jeremiah 5:31; Romans 6:21; Hebrews 13:4; Revelation 21:8; 22:15
when
Numbers 5:27; 1 Corinthians 5:4,5
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 28:15 - I am sore;  Job 13:26 - makest;  Job 20:11 - bones;  Job 33:21 - His flesh;  Proverbs 8:36 - all;  Proverbs 15:32 - refuseth;  Proverbs 21:17 - loveth;  Proverbs 23:32 - At;  Jeremiah 23:20 - in the;  Ezekiel 7:16 - mourning

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 5:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-5.html.