Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 16:9

Men were scorched with fierce heat; and they blasphemed the name of God who has the power over these plagues, and they did not repent so as to give Him glory.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Astronomy;   Blasphemy;   Character;   God;   Impenitence;   Temple;   Wicked (People);   Scofield Reference Index - Resurrection;   The Topic Concordance - Wrath;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Character of the Wicked;   Repentance;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Day of the lord;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Blasphemy;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Order;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Blasphemy;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Authority;   Gnashing of Teeth;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;   Plagues of Egypt;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Angels;   Glory;   Plague;   Repentance;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Vials;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Blasphemy;   Revelation of John:;   Sore;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

They repented not - No moral national amendment has taken place in consequence of the above calamities in that unhappy country, nor indeed any of those nations engaged against her in that long and ruinous contest, which has now terminated, (1817), without producing one political, moral, or religious advantage to herself or to Europe.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-16.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And men were scorched with great heat - That is, as above expressed, calamity came upon them which would be well represented by such heat. It is said that this calamity would come upon people, and we are to suppose that it would be such that human life would be particularly affected; and as that heat of the sun must be exceedingly intense which would cut down people, we are to suppose that the judgment here referred to would be intensely severe.

And blasphemed the name of God - The effect would be to cause them to blaspheme God or to reproach him as the author of these calamities; and in the fulfillment of this we are to look for a state of things when there would be augmented wickedness and irreligion, and when people would become worse and worse, notwithstanding the woes that had come upon them.

Which hath power over these plagues - Who had brought these plagues upon them, and who had power to remove them.

And they repented not - The effect was not to produce repentance, though it was manifest that these judgments had come upon them on account of their sins. Compare the notes on Revelation 9:21.

To give him glory - To turn from sin; to honor him by lives of obedience. Compare the notes on John 9:24.

In regard to the “application” of this the following things may be remarked:

(a)That the calamity here referred to was one of the series of events which would precede the overthrow of the “beast,” and contribute to that, for to this all these judgments tend.

(b)In the order in which it stands it is to follow, and apparently to follow soon, the third judgment - the pouring of the vial upon the fountains and streams.

(c)It would be a calamity such as if the sun, the source of light and comfort to mankind, were smitten, and became a source of torment.

(d)This would be attended by a great destruction of people, and we should naturally look in such an application for calamities in which multitudes of people would be, as it were, consumed.

(e)This would not be followed, as it might be hoped it would, by repentance, but would be attended with reproaches of God, with profaneness, with a great increase of wickedness.

Now, on the supposition that the explanation of the previous passages is correct, there can be no great difficulty in supposing that this refers to the wars of Europe following the French revolution, the wars that preceded the direct attack on the papacy and the overthrow of the papal government, for these events had all the characteristics here referred to:

(a) They were one of a series in weakening the papal power in Europe - heavy blows that will yet be seen to have been among the means preliminary to its final overthrow.

(b) They followed in their order the invasion of Northern Italy, for one of the purposes of that invasion was to attack the Austrian power there, and ultimately through the Tyrol to attack Austria itself. Napoleon, after his victories in Northern Italy, above referred to (compare chapter xx of Alison‘s History of Europe ), thus writes to the French Directory: “Coni, Ceva, and Alexandria are in the hands of our army; if you do not ratify the convention I will keep these fortresses and march upon Turin. Meanwhile I shall march tomorrow against Beaulieu, and drive him across the Po; I shall follow close at his heels, overrun all Lombardy, and in a month be in the Tyrol, join the army of the Rhine, and carry our united forces into Bavaria. That design is worthy of you, of the army, and of the destinies of France” (Alison, i. 401).

(c) The campaign in Germany in 1796 followed immediately this campaign in Italy. Thus, in chapter xx. of Alison‘s History, we have an account of the campaign in Italy; in chapter xxi. we have the account of the campaign in Germany; and the other wars in Europe that continued so long, and that were so fierce and bloody, followed in quick succession - all tending, in their ultimate results, to weaken the papal power and to secure its final overthrow.

(d) It is hardly necessary to say here that these wars had all the characteristics here supposed. It was as if the sun were smitten in the heavens and power were given to scorch people with fire. Europe seemed to be on fire with musketry and artillery, and presented almost the appearance of the broad blaze of a battlefield. The number that perished was immense. These wars were attended with the usual consequences - blasphemy, profaneness, and reproaches of God in every form. And yet there was another effect wholly in accordance with the statement here, that none of these judgments brought people to “repentance, that they might give God the glory.” Perhaps these remarks, which might be extended to great length, will show that, on the supposition that it was intended to refer to those scenes by the outpouring of this vial, the symbol was well chosen and appropriate.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-16.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And men were scorched with great heat: and they blasphemed the name of God who hath power over these plagues; and they repented not to give him glory.

And they were scorched with great heat ... The wars, revolutions, social unrest, bitterness and frustrations of our present times may only be a token of what is indicated by this. The less true light possessed by people from the word of God, the more they are scorched and burned by the fires of evil.

They blasphemed ... they repented not ... Eller and several others viewed this and a similar statement in Revelation 16:11 as, "a possible reference to the possibility of repentance";[26] but the more likely view is that it is intended for us to see by the final and terminal nature of these judgments that, "Not for one moment did these men think of repenting."[27]

[26] Vernard Eller, The Most Revealing Book of the Bible (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1974), p. 148.

[27] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 473.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And men were scorched with great heat,.... Burned with rage against the followers of Christ; were filled with envy at the success of his Gospel, and with fury and madness at the ruinous condition of the antichristian state, being deprived of its head, and chief officers:

and blasphemed the name of God, which hath power over these plagues; plagues or judgments are from God, when and wherever they come; they are sent and inflicted by him, and he can lessen or increase them, continue or remove them, as he pleases; and these, unless sanctified, will not reform men, but harden them, and set them a blaspheming the author of them. And this blasphemy may either respect the nature and perfections of God, charging him with inequality in his ways, and with injustice and unfaithfulness; or the Gospel, and the truths of it, which declare his glory, and his greatness; and which will now have a general spread, to the great mortification and confusion of the followers of antichrist:

and they repented not to give him glory; that is, they did not repent of their wicked deeds, their idolatries, murders, sorceries, fornications, and thefts, as in Revelation 9:20 so as to own and confess them, which is, the meaning of giving glory to God in repentance; see Joshua 7:19. This shows that repentance is not in man's power, but in the gift of God's grace; for though he may give space, yet if he does not give grace to repent, no man will repent; nor will any means of themselves produce it; as not the most powerful and awakening ministry, as the ministry of John the Baptist, and of Christ, and of the Gospel preachers that will be in those times, this vial refers to, nor the greatest mercies and favours, so not the severest judgments; see Amos 6:6. The event of this vial, or the plague of it, is applied, by Mr. Daubuz, to the wars between the emperors and the popes, and between the Guelphs and Gibelines.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-16.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

menGreek,the men.”

repented not to give him glory — (Revelation 9:20). Affliction, if it does not melt, hardens the sinner. Compare the better result on others, Revelation 11:13; Revelation 14:7; Revelation 15:4.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-16.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Were scorched (εκαυματιστησανekaumatisthēsan). First aorist passive indicative of same verb.

With great heat (καυμα μεγαkauma mega). Cognate accusative retained with the passive verb. Old word (from καιωkaiō to burn), in N.T. only Revelation 7:16 and here. For blaspheming the name of God see Revelation 13:6; James 2:7; Romans 2:24; 1 Timothy 6:1. They blamed God for the plagues.

They repented not (ου μετενοησανou metenoēsan). This solemn negative aorist of μετανοεωmetanoeō is a refrain like a funeral dirge (Revelation 9:20.; Revelation 16:11). In Revelation 11:13 some did repent because of the earthquake. Even deserved punishment may harden the heart.

To give him glory (δουναι αυτωι δοχανdounai autōi doxan). Second aorist active infinitive of διδωμιdidōmi almost result. For the phrase see Revelation 11:13; Revelation 14:7; Revelation 19:7.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-16.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Repent to give Him glory

Glorify Him by repentance.

His kingdom was darkened

Compare Exodus 10:21, Exodus 10:22.

They gnawed ( ἐμασσῶντο )

Only here in the New Testament.

For pain ( ἐκ τοῦ πόνου )

Strictly, from their pain. Their, the force of the article τοῦ .

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-16.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And men were scorched with great heat, and blasphemed the name of God, which hath power over these plagues: and they repented not to give him glory.

And the men blasphemed God, who had power over these plagues — They could not but acknowledge the hand of God, yet did they harden themselves against him.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-16.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

9 And men were scorched with great heat, and blasphemed the name of God, which hath power over these plagues: and they repented not to give him glory.

Ver. 9. And men were scorched] Or parched, scalded, roasted, εκαυματισθησαν. This is by accident in regard of the Scriptures; for the Lord speaketh peace to his people; and his word is good to those that are good, Micah 2:7. But as Origen saith of devils, so may we say of Papists; there is no greater torment to them than the word of God. In hoc eorum omnis flamma est, in hoc uruntur incendio. Hence they burn up Bibles, tanquam doctrinam peregrinam, as strange doctrine. (Spec. Europ.) Hence they censure St Paul as savouring of heresy, and could find in their hearts to purge his Epistles. Eckius is not afraid to say, that Christ did never command his disciples to write, but to preach only. (Enchirid. loc. com. cap. Eccles.) Bellarmine saith, the Bible is no more than commonitorium, a kind of storehouse for advice. Hosius saith that the pope’s interpretation, though it seem never so repugnant to the Scripture, is nevertheless ipsissimum Dei verbura, the very word of God. The Council of Basil answered the Hussites (requiring Scripture proofs for such doctrines as were thrust upon them), that the Scriptures were not of the being of the Church, but of the well being only; that traditions were the touchstone of doctrine and foundation of faith.

And blasphemed the name of God] The truth of God contained in the Scriptures. What a devil made thee to meddle with the Scripture said Stephen Gardiner to Marbeck. They tell us of several that have been possessed by that means; and assure us that our condemnation is so expressly set down in our own Bibles, and is so clear to all the world, that nothing more needs hereto than that we know to read, and to have our eyes in our heads at the opening thereof. (Alex. Cook.)

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-16.html. 1865-1868.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 2520

REPENTANCE

Revelation 16:9. And they repented not to give Him glory.

THROUGHOUT this chapter, the Apostle is speaking of the seven last plagues which were to be poured out upon the earth by the instrumentality of seven different angels, each of them having a vial of wrath committed to his hands for that purpose [Note: Revelation 15:1; Revelation 15:7.]. As no man can with certainty determine the periods and the events to which these prophecies refer, I shall forbear to speak of them, any further than to observe, that God would by these afflictive dispensations bring men to repentance; but “they repented not to give Him glory.” The same, alas! may be said of too many amongst ourselves: for whose benefit I propose to consider the subject of repentance, and to commend it to them,

I. As giving glory to God—

I conceive that all will readily acknowledge that they need repentance; so that I need not at present enter upon that point, or endeavour to convince any that it is their duty to repent. But the true light in which repentance should be viewed is not generally seen: it is regarded only as a means of averting wrath: whereas it should be considered as “giving glory to God.” Sin has greatly dishonoured God: it, in fact, pours contempt on every perfection of the Deity, saying, “Tush, God shall not see; neither will the Almighty regard it.” Repentance, on the contrary, honours God, and “gives glory to Him;”

1. As an omnipresent and omniscient God—

[Repentance, if it be really genuine, enters into all the secrets of the soul, and spreads them before God; acknowledging, that God has seen them all, and that he will surely call us into judgment for them — — — Now, I entreat you, brethren, to honour God in this view; and, like Achan, to “give glory to Him, confessing” before him what no human eye has ever seen, even the most hidden abominations of your hearts [Note: Joshua 7:19.] — — —]

2. As a just and holy God—

[An impenitent man considers his sins as light and venial; and thinks that God may well overlook them, without any expressions of his wrath and indignation. But a true penitent regards God as “of purer eyes than to behold iniquity,” and as bound, for the honour of his own moral government, to execute vengeance on the transgressors of his law. Real humility will justify God in all his threatenings; and will tremble at them, as sure to be executed in their appointed season — — — Do ye then, beloved, see how impossible it is for you ever to dwell in the Divine presence, unless you be first cleansed from your guilt in “the fountain opened for sin and for uncleanness,” and purified from your pollutions by the influences of the Holy Spirit. See this; feel this; acknowledge this; and hope for mercy in no other way than this — — —]

3. As a merciful and gracious God—

[Nothing but a persuasion that God is merciful can ever encourage true penitence. Without this view of the Deity, a man will lie down in utter despair — — — But look into the Scriptures; hear the representation which Jehovah gives of his own character, as “merciful and gracious, keeping mercy for thousands, and forgiving iniquity, transgression, and sin;” and then will you come to him, not merely as to a Governor and a Judge, but as to a Father and a Friend — — —]

4. As a true and faithful God—

[Question not his invitations or his promises: but take them; trust in them; plead them before the mercy-seat; and determine, that, if you ever perish, you will perish at the foot of the cross, looking to Jesus as your only hope, and resting altogether on his meritorious death and passion — — — This is the posture of every true penitent: nor shall any sinner in the universe, who thus comes to God, ever fail of obtaining mercy at his hands — — —]

But I would commend repentance to you further,

II. As answering the end of all his dispensations—

God “delighteth not in the death of a sinner, but rather that he turn from his wickedness and live.” To bring men to him with penitential sorrow, and thus to effect their restoration to his favour, is the end of all his dispensations. It is the end,

1. Of his mercies—

[Considering what a world this is, it is wonderful that God does not break forth in indignation against us, and overwhelm us all, as he did Sodom and Gomorrah. But on the great mass of mankind he is conferring the richest benefits from day to day; “causing his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and his rain to descend on the just and on the unjust.” Let all of us survey the dealings of God with us from our youth up; and we shall see that God has borne with us beyond all that we could have reasonably expected; and that our “blessings have been double” the amount of the judgments we have merited [Note: Isaiah 40:2; Isaiah 61:7.]. And what has been God’s design in all these dispensations? Has it been to encourage our thoughtlessness, and to lull us asleep in our sins? No: it has been, as St. Paul expressly tells us, “to lead us to repentance [Note: Romans 2:4.].” And shall not these mercies be improved for this end? Let us blush, and be ashamed, that ever we could continue in rebellion against so good a God, and so basely requite our heavenly Benefactor — — —]

2. Of his judgments—

[God does sometimes strive with men in a way of merited displeasure: and, when he does so, he bids us “hear the rod, and Him that hath appointed it,” And is there any thing difficult to be understood in such dispensations as these? No: he has told us “wherefore he visits men for sin:” and, if he have threatened to punish the impenitent “seven-fold more for their sins,” and “to scourge them with scorpions,” the deduction is clear, namely, that “he chastises us for our profit, that he may make us partakers of his holiness.” He seeks by all means to “bring us to repentance, and to the acknowledgment of the truth.” Has he then afflicted any of us, either in our own persons, or in the persons of those who are dear unto us? Are we troubled in any respect, in mind, body, or estate? Let us make it an occasion of inquiring “wherefore God contendeth with us;” and of turning unto him with truly penitential sorrow, if by any means he turn from his fierce anger, and be pacified towards us [Note: Amos 4:6-12.] — — —]

Let me conclude with a word of salutary advice—

1. Let your repentance be genuine—

[Let it not be such as is but too common in a season of affliction, a forced acknowledgment of sins, which yet you have no disposition to renounce [Note: Psalms 78:34-37.]; but such as the Corinthians experienced under the remonstrances of St. Paul [Note: 2 Corinthians 7:10-11.] — — — O that in all these different exercises of mind, you may make it clear that your repentance is genuine, even “such a repentance as is never to be repented of!”]

2. Delay it not—

[Many defer their repentance, under an idea that in a season of sickness or affliction they will find it more easy. But, in truth, the very reverse of this will be found more agreeable to fact and experience. Afflictions will not, of themselves, humble the soul: they will rather irritate and harden the soul of man; just as they wrought on the proud rebellious Pharaoh, and on the persons specified in my text [Note: See ver. 10, 11.]. Ask of persons, when bowed down with pain or trouble, whether they find the same freedom of mind as in seasons of ease: and they will tell you, that they are rather impeded than aided, in their repentance, by the distractions which they suffer. Be ye then, brethren, careful to improve the present time. And if ye will really give glory to your God, in repenting of your sins, you need not fear but that he will receive you to mercy, and honour you as his accepted and peculiar people.]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/revelation-16.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 16:9. ἐβλασφήμησαν, they blasphemed) A dreadful sin, blasphemy: but yet even against the will of the wicked it turns out to the honour of GOD: for they confess, that they succumb.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-16.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

What the damned do in hell, where the wrath of God is poured out upon men to the utmost, that reprobates do upon earth, they are

scorched with great heat, the vengeance of God cometh upon them; they are mad and enraged, and speak evil of a just and righteous God, who bringeth such plagues on them; but they have no sense of their sins, nor any thoughts of turning to God, confessing their sins, and giving him glory. This will be the upshot of God’s lesser judgments upon the papacy: they will be mad at them, and rage, and reproach God’s justice, but prove a hardened generation, given over to ruin, that will never be sensible that these judgments come upon them for their idolatries and superstitions, and for their persecutions, and the shedding the blood of God’s holy ones. Not that all adhering to that church will be so, (many, probably, will convert, and be brought to acknowledge the truth), but there will be a great party of them, whom nothing but the wrath of God come upon them in the bottomless pit to the utmost, will ever make sensible that they have done amiss, being given up to strong delusions, to a blind mind, and a hard heart, and a reprobate judgment.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-16.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

не вразумились Невероятно, но грешники все еще будут отказываться каяться (ср. ст. 11, 21) и, наоборот, будут хулить Бога, зная, что Он послал им их страдания.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-16.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

They repented not; they grew no better under their torment, being given up to hardness of heart and blindness of men. The elements, which ordinarily are sources of rich blessings, become, when commissioned by God, sources of exquisite anguish to his foes.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-16.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Evidently climatic changes will take place resulting in the sun"s heat becoming much hotter than normal (cf. Deuteronomy 32:24; Isaiah 24:6; Isaiah 42:25; Malachi 4:1; perhaps the destruction of the ozone layer?). Nevertheless instead of repenting, the beast-worshippers curse God (cf. Revelation 16:11; Revelation 16:21). They recognize His sovereignty, but they refuse to honor Him as sovereign (cf. Romans 1:28; Romans 2:24; 1 Timothy 6:1; James 2:7). Deserved judgment hardens the callous heart even more, as it did Pharaoh. [Note: Ford, p262; Robertson, 6:422.]

"This is the only chapter in the visional portion of the book that speaks of widespread human blasphemy, the other references being to blasphemy from the beast ( Revelation 13:1; Revelation 13:5-6; Revelation 17:3). These men have now taken on the character of the god whom they serve ... They blame God for the first four plagues, rather than blaming their own sinfulness." [Note: Thomas, Revelation 8-22, p257.]

Previously some people repented because of the earthquake in Jerusalem ( Revelation 11:13), but now none do. Giving God glory is the result of repentance.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-16.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 16:9. And men were scorched with great heat, and they blasphemed the name of God, which hath the power over these plagues, and they repented not to give him glory. The blaspheming is produced not by the last plague alone, but by the four that have been spoken of,—‘plagues’ not plague.—The effect is worthy of notice. There is no repentance. Those visited are the followers of the beast. They have chosen their portion; they have hardened themselves; and they are made worse by judgment.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-16.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

power. The texts add "the". App-172.

over. App-104.

repented. App-111.

not. App-106.

glory. See p. 1511.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And men were scorched with great heat, and blasphemed the name of God, which hath power over these plagues: and they repented not to give him glory.

Men - `the men.' Repented not to give him glory - (Revelation 9:20.) Affliction, if it does not melt, hardens. Compare the better result on others (Revelation 11:13; Revelation 14:7; Revelation 15:4).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-16.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And men were scorched with great heat, and blasphemed the name of God, which hath power over these plagues: and they repented not to give him glory.
scorched
or, burned. blasphemed.
10,11,21; 2 Kings 6:33; 2 Chronicles 28:22; Isaiah 1:5; 8:21; Jeremiah 5:3; 6:29,30; Ezekiel 24:13
and they
11; 2:21; 9:20; Daniel 5:22,23; Luke 13:3,5; 2 Corinthians 12:21
to give
11:13; 14:7; Joshua 7:19; Jeremiah 13:6; Amos 4:6-12
Reciprocal: Genesis 1:16 - to rule;  Genesis 4:13 - GeneralGenesis 42:22 - his blood;  Exodus 8:15 - he hardened;  Exodus 9:2 - GeneralExodus 11:1 - Yet will;  Joshua 10:13 - So the sun;  1 Samuel 6:5 - give glory;  Job 1:11 - and he will curse thee;  Psalm 140:10 - burning coals;  Psalm 148:8 - Fire;  Proverbs 19:3 - fretteth;  Isaiah 3:24 - burning;  Isaiah 42:25 - he knew;  Isaiah 51:20 - a wild;  Jeremiah 2:30 - In vain;  Jeremiah 25:16 - GeneralLamentations 3:39 - a man;  Malachi 2:2 - to give;  Matthew 11:20 - because;  Luke 16:30 - repent;  Colossians 3:8 - blasphemy;  2 Timothy 3:2 - blasphemers;  Revelation 2:5 - and repent;  Revelation 2:16 - Repent;  Revelation 8:12 - and the third part of the sun

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-16.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The intense heat caused men to blaspheme the name of God because of their suffering; that was because they recognized Him as being the cause of the aflliction. But the very motive that caused them to blaspheme Him, should have had the effect of making them repent, for they must have known that a Being who can bring such tremendous revolutions in the universe is worthy to be feared and served.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-16.html. 1952.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 16:9. And the men were scorched with great heat, and blasphemed the name of God, who has power over these plagues, and repented not to give him glory. The words: and the men were scorched with great heat, stands related to what follows, as the cause to its effect. It is the loose Hebraistic mode of placing the two in juxtaposition; for: And because the men were thus, etc., they blasphemed. The blaspheming is mentioned in connection with all the four plagues, with the exception only of the sixth. This exception is explained, not so much from the description there being in other respects much more extended than in the others, as on the ground that in it the catastrophe was nearly prepared, and hence the occasion for blaspheming was not fully given. They could not deny the being of the Great God; it presses itself upon them with power; it even lies upon them as a frightful load; and if the mouth should deny, the heart would revenge the falsehood. But because they would not recognise the sin as sin, they rage against him as a revolting tyrant; they blaspheme him, because they cannot murder him. "The heart of Pharaoh was hardened,"—this is the perpetual refrain in the history of the Egyptian plagues, which for all times refutes the rationalistic error, that an inherently beneficial power resides in suffering, and which loudly witnesses against every theory that propounds another aim for divine, and by consequence also for human punishments, than that of retributive righteousness. Bossuet points to the fact, that in the times of Roman dominion the heathen threw upon the Christians all the blame of the misfortunes that befel the empire. If we abide by the letter, this certainly cannot be included here. The heathen ascribed their misfortunes to the neglected worship of their gods. But faith in these had so little root in their minds, that we are justified in regarding the allegation merely as a pretext or a self delusion, and in considering the real ground of their exasperation to be, that the hand of the God of the Christians lay heavy upon them, and that they were bruised by him, whom they would not worship. Bengel remarks, "Blasphemy is a dreadful sin. But in spite of the wicked themselves it still contributes to the glory of God. Blasphemers themselves admit their impotence, since they only resist with their impious mouth; and confess the power of God, which, without any thanks to them, tends to glorify the name of God. They revolt against God, and are in pain, but he is honoured upon them. The saints, when they are overcome by their sufferings, may wish in the depth of their dejection that they themselves were not, as Job anciently cursed his being. But the wicked go much farther, and blaspheme the holy name of God." In regard to the persons blaspheming, the limitation is to be derived from ch. Revelation 15:4. We there learn that the suffering does not prove to all a curse, that many find it a blessing, and, like the penitent thief, are filled with contrition, when they receive what their deeds have deserved. But, if we look more narrowly into the case of such, we shall find "that something existed beforehand, which is only quickened into life. What, however, was dead and corrupt, that remains under pains and sufferings as it was, or, if any change takes place, it is for the worse."

They blaspheme the name of God (comp. on ch. Revelation 13:6), not the Deity, but the God who has manifested himself by his deeds, the God of Jesus Christ, the God of the church which inflames the worshippers of the beast to more wrath, that she constantly confesses this same God to be the author of the calamities under which they groan. They blaspheme the name of God, who has power over these plagues. (The best MSS. have τὴ ν ἐ ξουσί αν, which Luther omits). That they blaspheme him because he has the power is shown by Revelation 16:11, "because of their pains and their sores;" and Revelation 16:21, "men blasphemed the Lord because of the plague of hail." These plagues is to be explained on the ground, that in this plague the others were substantially contained.

On the words, "and they repented not," comp. ch. Revelation 9:20. The repentance is placed in this, that men give glory to God. Glory is given to God by him, who recognizes, that the suffering is a deserved punishment of a sin, and, therefore, that it serves to glorify God, who is sanctified by the judgment. Berleb. Bible: "To give glory to God—to recognize his righteousness, and to fall down under his rod with humble supplication." Bengel: "In repentance, the most essential thing is to give glory to God. Man must at once shut his mouth, or even lay his hand on it: but God receives the glory. Now, where man does not yield, but stands out in a spirit of proud and hardened defiance, there God also does not yield, and in such a conflict man must come far short, he must be consumed. "For a moment Pharaoh gave God glory, in Exodus 9:27, when he said to Moses and Aaron," The Lord is righteous, and I and my people are wicked."But it did not last long. "When Pharaoh saw that the thunder and the rain ceased, he sinned yet more, and hardened his heart, he and his servants."

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-16.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9.Blasphemed—Penalty sometimes admonishes and reforms, as in Revelation 11:13; but it aggravates the hardened, as here and in Revelation 9:21. Like the hardened Israelites of Isaiah 8:21, these sun-scorched sinners could only “curse their God and look upward.”

From the four creation points the avenger now approaches nearer and nearer the beast. Clearly, (notwithstanding Dusterdieck’s denial,) there is a distinct transition from the previous four vials, poured upon points of inanimate nature, on account of man, and the three directly poured upon the bestial throne, his Euphratean population, and his metropolis.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-16.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 16:9. Failure to honour the true God, a note of the heathen spirit (as in Revelation 11:13, Revelation 14:7; Romans 1:28). See Introd., § 6. For the general idea, cf. 2 Clem. ix.: “while we have opportunity of being healed, let us give ourselves over to God the healer, giving him a recompense. And what recompense? Repentance from a sincere heart.’ Let us give him eternal praise.”

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 16:9". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-16.html. 1897-1910.