Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 2:3

and you have perseverance and have endured for My name's sake, and have not grown weary.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Decision;   Ephesus;   Patience;   Persecution;   Righteousness;   Zeal, Religious;   Scofield Reference Index - Life;   Repentance;   Rewards;   Satan;   Thompson Chain Reference - Afflictions;   Blessings-Afflictions;   Faint Not;   Trials;   The Topic Concordance - Hate;   Repentance;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Patience;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ephesus;   Synagogue;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Apocalyptic literature;   Ephesus;   John, letters of;   Love;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Perseverance;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Episcopacy;   Ministry, Gospel;   Patience of God;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Timothy, the First Epistle to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Asia;   Magi;   Nicolas;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Elements ;   Patience;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ephesians, Epistle to the;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sepharvaim;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ephesus;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Tim'othy;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Faint;   Revelation of John:;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for April 1;   Every Day Light - Devotion for March 25;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And hast borne - The same things mentioned in the preceding verse, but in an inverted order, the particular reason of which does not appear; perhaps it was intended to show more forcibly to this Church that there was no good which they had done, nor evil which they had suffered, that was forgotten before God.

And hast not fainted - They must therefore have had a considerable portion of this love remaining, else they could not have thus acted.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-2.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And hast borne - Hast borne up under trials; or hast borne with the evils with which you have been assailed. That is, you have not given way to murmuring or complaints in trial, you have not abandoned the principles of truth and yielded to the prevalence of error.

And hast patience - That is, in this connection, hast shown that thou canst bear up under these things with patience. This is a repetition of what is said in Revelation 2:2, but in a somewhat different connection. There it rather refers to the trouble which they had experienced on account of the pretensions of false apostles, and the patient, persevering, and enduring spirit which they had shown in that form of trial; here the expression is more general, denoting a patient spirit in regard to all forms of trial.

And for my name‘s sake hast laboured - On account of me, and in my cause. That is, the labor here referred to, whatever it was, was to advance the cause of the Redeemer. In the word rendered “hast labored” ( κεκοπιακας kekopiakas) there is a reference to the word used in the previous verse - “thy labor” ( κόπον σου kopon sou); and the design is to show that the “labor,” or trouble there referred to, was on account of him.

And hast not fainted - Hast not become exhausted, or wearied out, so as to give over. The word used here ( κάμνω kamnō) occurs in only three places in the New Testament: “Lest ye be wearied, and faint,” Hebrews 12:3; “The prayer of faith shall save the sick,” James 5:15; and in the passage before us. It means properly to become weary and faint from toil, etc.; and the idea here is, that they had not become so wearied out as to give over from exhaustion. The sense of the whole passage is thus rendered by Prof. Stuart: “Thou canst not bear with false teachers, but thou canst bear with troubles and perplexities on account of me; thou hast undergone wearisome toil, but thou art not wearied out thereby.” The state of mind, considered as the state of mind appropriate to a Christian, here represented, is, that we should not tolerate error and sin, but that we should bear up under the trials which they may incidentally occasion us; that we should have such a repugnance to evil that we cannot endure it, as evil, but that we should have such love to the Saviour and his cause as to be willing to bear anything, even in relation to that, or springing from that, that we may be called to suffer in that cause; that while we may be weary in his work, for our bodily strength may become exhausted (compare Matthew 26:41), we should not be weary of it; and that though we may have many perplexities, and may meet with much opposition, yet we should not relax our zeal, but should persevere with an ardor that never faints, until our Saviour calls us to our reward.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-2.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

and thou hast patience and didst bear for my name's sake, and hast not grown weary.

Thou hast patience ... Here again is the word which means not merely a passive submission to what must be endured, but the dynamic ability of endurance and faithfulness without discouragement by any or all difficulties.

For my name's sake ... The New Testament emphasis upon the name of the Lord is extensive. Salvation is in no other name (Acts 4:12); all Christian activities are to be done in his name (Colossians 3:17); we are justified in his name (1 Corinthians 6:11); we are baptized in his name (Acts 2:38; 19:5); we are called by his name (James 2:7); our sins are forgiven for his name's sake (1 John 2:12); we should believe on his name (1 John 5:13), etc. Here, the patient endurance of the Ephesian church was commended by the Lord himself because their faithfulness had regard to the holy name of the Son of God.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And hast borne,.... Not evil men, nor false apostles, but "burdens", as the Ethiopic version reads, and as the word signifies; meaning afflictions, reproaches, and persecutions, which pressed sore, and lay heavy on these ministers and churches; and yet they bore them with constancy and cheerfulness, and were not moved by them. The Arabic version reads, "and thou hast borne me"; my name and Gospel, among the Gentiles, and carried it from place to place; see Acts 9:15,

and hast patience; which they had from God, as his gift, and which they had in their hearts, and in exercise, and found it useful to them. It was in exercise in a suitable time, and it continued with them; it was not worn out through the length and greatness of their trials,

And for my name's sake hast laboured: which may refer either to enduring sufferings for Christ's name's sake, for his Gospel's sake, for righteousness sake, for the sake of the elect, and for the sake of the honour, glory, and interest of Christ; or to labouring in the ministry, not for filthy lucre sake, nor for party sake, but for the honour of Christ, and the good of souls; and there never was an interval in which this was more true:

and hast not fainted: so as to sink under the burden borne; to have patience quite tired out; to, be weary of labouring for Christ's name's sake; and so as to give out, and quit the service of Christ.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-2.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

patience — The oldest manuscripts transpose these words. Then translate as Greek, “persevering endurance  …  borne.” “Thou hast borne” My reproach, but “thou canst not bear the evil” (Revelation 2:2). A beautiful antithesis.

and  …  hast laboured, and hast not fainted — The two oldest manuscripts and oldest versions read, “and  …  hast not labored,” omitting “and hast fainted.” The difficulty which transcribers by English Version reading tried to obviate, was the seeming contradiction, “I know thy labor  …  and thou hast not labored.” But what is meant is, “Thou hast not been wearied out with labor.”

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-2.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Thou hast (εχειςecheis). Continued possession of patience.

Didst bear (εβαστασαςebastasas). First aorist indicative of βασταζωbastazō repeated reference to the crisis in Revelation 2:2.

And hast not grown weary (και ου κεκοπιακεςkai ou kekopiakes). Perfect active indicative of κοπιαωkopiaō old verb, to grow weary (Matthew 6:28), play on the word κοποςkopos late form in ες̇es for the regular ας̇as (λελυκαςlelukas). like απηκεςaphēkes (Revelation 2:4) and πεπτωκεςpeptōkes (Revelation 2:5). “Tired in loyalty, not of it. The Ephesian church can bear anything except the presence of impostors in her membership” (Moffatt).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-2.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

The best texts omit οὐ κέκμηκας hastnot grown weary, and read καὶ οὐ κεκοπίακες hastnot grown weary. The transcribers supposed the verb κοπιάω to mean only to labor; whereas it includes the sense of weariness from labor.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-2.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

3 And hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name’s sake hast laboured, and hast not fainted.

Ver. 3. And hast borne] Bear the false apostles thou couldst not; but hast borne much from them. Morientium nempe ferarum violentiores sunt morsus. Beasts bite hardest when to bite their last.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-2.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Revelation 2:3. And hast borne, "And I know thou hast sustained, with exemplary fortitude, the trouble they have given thee; and hast exercised invincible patience under all thy sufferings and trials in my cause; and thou hast laboured constantly and tenaciously for my name's sake, and to establish the faith of my people; and hast not fainted under thy toils or tribulations."

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/revelation-2.html. 1801-1803.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 2:3. As in Revelation 2:2 ( καὶ ἐπείρασας, κ. τ. λ.) that is amplified which was briefly indicated by the words καὶ ὅτι οὐ δύνῃ βαστάσαι κακούς, so now, also, the first point of the acknowledgment ( τ. κοπ. κ. τ. ὑπομ. σου) is developed on a definite side, and that, too, so that not only with ὑπομονὴν ἕχεις the above ὑπομονὴν σου is again taken up, but also the ἐκβάστασας διὰ τ. ὅν. μου(942) is placed in a significant antithesis to the οὐ δύνῃ βαστάσαι κακούς, and by the καὶ οὐ κεκοπίακες(943) it is indicated that the κόπος of believers furnished with the right ὑπομονή has resulted neither in succumbing nor weariness. Beng.: “I know thy labor; yet thou dost not labor, i.e., shalt not be broken down by labor.”(944)

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/revelation-2.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 2:3. οὐ κεκοπίακας) Thus the Alex. MS. reads. The others also, with great agreement, οὐκ ἐκοπίασας: there is only the change of σ for κ made by the latter, from the rhythm ἐβάστασας.(28) See App. Ed. ii. on this passage.— κοπιᾷν is used for κά΄νειν, Matthew 11:28, 1 Corinthians 4:12; also John 4:6. Whence in the Septuagint it answers to the words חשׁל כאל לאה עיף חלה, and especially to יגע. Hesychius, κεκ΄ηκὼς, κεκοπιακώς. The Antanaclasis [See Append. Technical Terms], praised by Wolf, is this: I know thy labour; and yet thou dost not labour, that is, thou art not wearied with labour.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-2.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And hast borne the contradiction of false teachers, and the persecutions of Jews and pagans; for at this time the second persecution was began by Domitian.

And hast patience; grace (with quietness and submission) to bear the will of God in any sort of evils.

And for my name’s sake hast laboured; and for me hast laboured actively in propagating the truths of my gospel, as well as passively in the furnace of trials and persecutions.

And hast not fainted; and hast persevered so as thou hast neither been seduced to other doctrine by false teachers, nor lost thy integrity and holiness of conversation.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-2.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

и не изнемогал В течение 40 лет со дня ее основания эта церковь оставалась преданной Слову и Господу. Члены церкви прошли через трудности и преследования ради правильной цели: за имя и славу Христа.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-2.html.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

6. "Hast borne, hast patience, hast labored . . . hast not fainted"--2:3.

Here is the sphere of tolerance, what to bear and what not to bear. Infirmities and weaknesses can be shared with tolerance, but never to the point of condoning false doctrine, or of upholding false teachers. Of that class Paul said, in Galatians 2:5 : "To whom we gave place by subjection, no, not for an hour; that the truth of the gospel might continue with you."

In verse 6, they were commended for hating something; some graces had decayed, as in verses 5 and 6, but the hatred of evil had remained, and was extolled.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-2.html. 1966.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 2:3. (5) And thou hast patience. The ‘patience’ spoken of is the stedfast endurance already mentioned in Revelation 2:2, but the possession of the grace is enhanced by the use of the verb ‘have’—thou hast it, it is thine.—(6) And thou didst bear because of my name. They had not borne with evil men (Revelation 2:2); and yet, in not bearing them, in rejecting them, and in the struggle which was involved in doing so, they had had something to bear; they had borne the burden laid upon them because of the ‘name’ of Jesus, because of that revelation of the grace and love of God which had been given them in Him (comp. on John 14:13-14).—(7) And thou hast not grown weary. For the use of the word ‘grow weary,’ comp. John 4:6. In Revelation 2:2 they had been commended for their ‘toil;’ but now a step is taken in advance, they had not ‘grown weary’ in it. How hard the duty, and how high the grace!

Such are the seven points in which the Ephesian church is commended; and, if we are right in considering them as seven, it will follow that the fourth, ‘didst find them false,’ is the leading one of the seven; or, in other words, that the chief point of commendation in the state of the Christians at Ephesus is their instinctive discernment and rejection of false teachers, and their zeal for the true doctrine of Christ as handed down by His commissioned and inspired apostles. Around this all else that in their case was worthy of commendation centred. Here was the ‘toil’ that never wearied, the ‘endurance’ that never failed, the ‘bearing’ of that bitter cross which consisted, as it did so largely in the case of our Lord, in contending against the ‘grievous wolves’ that had entered into God’s heritage, and were snatching and scattering the sheep (John 10:12). The first ‘work’ of Christ, to maintain God’s true revelation of Himself against selfish error, appears in the Ephesian church.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-2.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

hast, &c. The texts read "and hast patient endurance and didst bear (Revelation 2:2) for", &c.

for . . . sake. App-104. Revelation 2:2.

name"s. See Acts 6:41.

fainted = wearied. Greek. kamno. Only here; Hebrews 12:3. James 5:15 (sick).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name's sake hast laboured, and hast not fainted.

Borne ... patience. 'Aleph (') A B C, Vulgate, transpose. 'Thou, hast borne' my reproach ('Aleph (') adds 'all afflictions' [ thlipsis (Greek #2347) pasas (Greek #3956)]), but 'canst not bear the evil' (Revelation 2:2). A beautiful antithesis.

And ... hast laboured, and hast not fainted. 'Aleph (') B [ekopiasas] A C h, Vulgate, read [ ouk (Greek #3756) kekopiakas (Greek #2872)], 'and ... hast not laboured;' omitting 'and hast fainted.' The difficulty which the received text tried to obviate was the seeming contradiction, 'I know thy labour ... and thou hast not laboured.' What is meant is, 'thou hast not been wearied out with labour.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-2.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) And hast borne.—This verse needs some change to bring it into harmony with the best MSS. It should stand, And hast (or, hadst) patience, and didst bear for My name’s sake, and didst not weary. In this last word there is a recurrence to the word (kopos) translated labour or toil in Revelation 2:2. They had toiled on to very weariness without wearying of their toil (Galatians 6:9), just as they could not bear the evil and yet had borne reproaches for Christ’s sake. “There is toil, and patience, and abhorrence of evil, and discernment, and again patience, and endurance, and unwearied exertion. What can be wanting here?” (Dr. Vaughan.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name's sake hast laboured, and hast not fainted.
hast borne
Psalms 69:7; Micah 7:9; Mark 15:21; Luke 14:27; 1 Corinthians 13:7; Galatians 6:2; Hebrews 13:13
hast patience
1:9; 3:10; Psalms 37:7; Luke 8:15; 21:19; Romans 2:7; 5:3,4; 8:25; 12:12; 15:4,5; Colossians 1:11; 2 Thessalonians 3:5; Hebrews 6:12,15; 10:36; 12:1; James 1:3,4; 5:7-11; 2 Peter 1:6
hast laboured
Romans 16:12; 1 Corinthians 16:16; 2 Corinthians 5:9; 6:5; 10:15; 11:23; Philippians 2:16; 4:3; 1 Thessalonians 1:3; 2:9; 5:12; 2 Thessalonians 3:8; 1 Timothy 4:10; 5:17; Hebrews 6:10
hast not
Luke 18:1; 2 Corinthians 4:1,16; Galatians 6:9; 2 Thessalonians 3:13; Hebrews 12:3-5
Reciprocal: Proverbs 24:10 - thou;  Isaiah 40:31 - not faint;  Zephaniah 3:16 - slack;  Matthew 5:11 - for;  Matthew 10:22 - for;  Mark 10:29 - for;  Luke 19:26 - and from;  Luke 21:17 - for;  2 Corinthians 12:10 - for Christ's;  Colossians 1:29 - labour;  3 John 1:7 - that;  Revelation 2:19 - patience

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-2.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Borne and patience are virtually the same as labor and patience in the preceding verse. The main idea is that they had followed such a course for a long time. They had likewise done these things for the Lord"s name's sake, which denotes a proper motive technically for their labors. Have not fainted means they had been unfaltering in their religious activities.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-2.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 2:3

Revelation 2:3 And hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name's sake hast laboured, and hast not fainted.

"And hast borne"

This church and her ministers did bear and endure reproaches, persecutions, and sufferings for the gospel and name of Christ, as other churches of Christ did. { 1 Thessalonians 2:14; 1 Thessalonians 2:16; 2 Thessalonians 1:4; 2 Corinthians 4:8-11}

"And hast patience"

to bear, suffer, endure more for Christ's sake.

"And for my name's sake," etc.

By the name of Christ is meant himself, his gospel, his ordinances, and whatsoever bears his name. { Matthew 28:19-20}

"Hast laboured"

viz. In the word and doctrine, and in the work and labour of love, which they shewed towards his name. { Hebrews 6:10}

"And hast not fainted"

in the work of the ministry, { 2 Corinthians 4:1; 2 Corinthians 4:8-10} because they received mercy { 2 Corinthians 4:1} and God received glory, { 2 Corinthians 4:15} for which cause we faint not, { 2 Corinthians 4:16-18} nor in the way of Christianity.

Christ's faithful ministers, and sanctified members, are preserved from fainting under all their tribulations and burdens, which they suffer patiently in the course of their ministry, and in the way of Christianity. { 2 Corinthians 1:8-10; 2 Corinthians 1:15-16}

That which keeps them from fainting, Isaiah, first, the serious consideration of the contradictions of sinners, which Christ himself suffered. { Hebrews 12:3} Secondly, an open vision and spiritual fight of unseen glory. { 2 Corinthians 4:18} Thirdly, That Divine Power, which God in Christ by the Holy Spirit doth suitably and seasonably communicate unto them. { Colossians 1:11; Isaiah 40:28-31}

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-2.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 2:3. Remember, therefore, how thou hast received and heard, and keep it and repent. If thou wilt not therefore watch, I will come as a thief, and thou wilt not know at what hour I shall come on thee. Remember therefore, since the case is so bad with thee You must not merely theoretically remember what you have received, but you must lay it to heart, and seriously consider in what opposition your life has stood to the pure doctrine delivered to yon, which requires living faith and cordial love. The how refers not to the manner of receiving and hearing, but to what has been received and heard; q.d. what is the nature or tendency of what ye have received. Of the simple manner of delivery we cannot think with Vitringa, as it is not the delivery, but the receiving and hearing that is spoken of. The passages 1 Timothy 6:20, 2 Timothy 1:14, Colossians 2:6, "As therefore ye have received the Lord Jesus, so walk in him," refer to the same subject. John appears to have had distinctly in view the passage last quoted. There, as here, it is pressed that the walk should be in unison with what had been received from Christ In regard to the keeping, comp. on Revelation 2:26.

The second therefore (which is wanting in Luther, while he has upon thee too much) joins to the exhortation, Repent: If thou, therefore, since thou so greatly needest repentance or a change of mind. There undoubtedly exists a reference to the declaration of our Lord, Matthew 24:42-43, "Watch, therefore, for ye know not at what hour your Lord comes; but know this, that if the goodman of the house had known in what watch the thief would come, he would have watched." How deep an impression this word of our Lord had made upon the minds of his disciples, is manifest from the allusions made to it elsewhere, 2 Peter 3:10, 1 Thessalonians 5:2, 1 Thessalonians 5:4, where the coming of the day of the Lord as a thief in the night is described as a thing which was already quite well known to the Thessalonians. The passage before us, and that in ch. Revelation 16:15, so far come nearer to the original one than the others, as in these two the coming of the Lord himself is compared to the coming of a thief, while in the other passages it is to the coming of the day of the Lord.

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-2.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3.Hast borne with even those whom thou canst not bear. A contradiction in terms, a truth in facts.

 

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-2.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 2:3. The tenses as in Revelation 2:2 denote a general attitude still existing, the outcome of some special stage of persecution for the sake of the Christian name. , cf. (Revelation 2:2), a slight play on words; “noui laborem tuum, nec tamen laboras, i.e., labore non frangeris” (Bengel). Tired in loyalty, not of it. The Ephesian church can bear anything except the presence of impostors in her membership.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-2.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

3. You are patient. All the Devil could do to them did not make them give up!

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 2:3". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-2.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.