Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 21:9

Then one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls full of the seven last plagues came and spoke with me, saying, "Come here, I will show you the bride, the wife of the Lamb."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Bride;   Church;   Heaven;   Jesus Continued;   Lamb of God;   Readings, Select;   Righteous;   Types;   Scofield Reference Index - Bride;   Thompson Chain Reference - Church;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Names;   Titles and Names;   The Topic Concordance - Jerusalem;   Newness;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ Is God;   Titles and Names of the Church;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jerusalem;   Solomon's Song;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Apocalyptic literature;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christians, Names of;   Church, the;   Create, Creation;   Jesus Christ;   Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times;   New Jerusalem;   Song of Solomon, Theology of;   Touch;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Bride of christ;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Bride;   Solomon, Song of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Canticles;   ;   Marriage;   Noah;   Thousand Years;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Art and Aesthetics;   Bride;   Heaven;   Heavenly City, the;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Marriage;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Bowl;   Dependence;   Family;   Lamb;   Love;   New Jerusalem;   Parousia;   Plague;   Revelation, Book of;   Type;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bride;   Lamb;   Revelation, the;   Vials;   29 Light Lamp Candle;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Bride;   Church;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Lamb;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Marriage;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Church;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jerusalem, New;   Revelation of John:;   Song of Songs;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Eschatology;   Gems;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The bride, the Lamb's wife - The pure and holy Christian Church.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-21.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And there came unto me one of the seven angels … - See the notes on Revelation 16:6-7. Why one of these angels was employed to make this communication is not stated. It may be that as they had been engaged in bringing destruction on the enemies of the church, and securing its final triumph, there was a propriety that that triumph should be announced by one of their number.

And talked with me - That is, in regard to what he was about to show me.

I will show thee the bride, the Lamb‘s wife - I will show you what represents the redeemed church now to be received into permanent union with its Lord - as a bride about to be united to her husband. See the notes on ver. 2. Compare Revelation 19:7-8.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-21.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And there came unto me one of the seven angels,.... Either the first of them, as one of the four beasts is the first of them, Revelation 6:1 or it may be the last, and very likely the same as in Revelation 17:1

which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues; that is, the wrath of God poured out by them on the antichristian party; see Revelation 15:1.

And talked with me, saying, come hither; see Revelation 17:1.

I will show thee the bride, the Lamb's wife. The "Lamb" is Christ, who is often so called in this book; see Revelation 5:6 Revelation 19:7 and is the Son of God, the heir of all things, the Maker and Governor of the universe, the King of kings, and Lord of lords; and who, as Mediator, has all accomplishments and qualifications to recommend him as a bridegroom, such as beauty, riches, and wisdom: the bride, his wife, is not any particular believer, nor any particular church; not the Gentile church, nor the Jewish church only, but all the elect of God, consisting of the raised and living saints at the coming of Christ; who will make up one body, one general assembly, and be as a bride, prepared and adorned for her husband: these were first betrothed to Christ in eternity, and were openly espoused by him, one by one, at conversion; and now being all gathered in by the effectual calling, the dead being raised, and the living changed, and all glorified, the marriage is consummated, and they are declared publicly to be the bride, the Lamb's wife; See Gill on Matthew 22:2. And now, though John had had a sight of her before, Revelation 21:2 yet that was but a glimmering one, at a distance, he being in the wilderness, Revelation 17:3 wherefore the angel calls him to him, and proposes to give him a clear, distinct, and particular view of her, in all her glory; and a glorious sight this indeed! to see the bride brought to the King in raiment of needlework, and the queen stand at his right hand in gold of Ophir. This is a sight of a quite different nature from that of the filthy strumpet, which the same angel proposed to give to John in Revelation 17:1.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-21.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

6 And there came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and talked with me, saying, Come hither, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb's wife.

(6) A transition to the describing of the heavenly Church, by the express calling of John in this verse, and his enrapturing by the Spirit, in confirmation of the truth of God in the verse following.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-21.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The same angel who had shown John Babylon the harlot, is appropriately employed to show him in contrast new Jerusalem, the Bride (Revelation 17:1-5). The angel so employed is the one that had the last seven plagues, to show that the ultimate blessedness of the Church is one end of the divine judgments on her foes.

unto me — A, B, and Vulgate omit.

the Lamb‘s wife — in contrast to her who sat on many waters (Revelation 17:1), (that is, intrigued with many peoples and nations of the world, instead of giving her undivided affections, as the Bride does, to the Lamb.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-21.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

One of the seven angels (εις εκ των επτα αγγελωνheis ek tōn hepta aggelōn). As in Revelation 17:1 with the same introduction when the angel made the announcement about the harlot city (Babylon), so here the description of the heavenly city, the New Jerusalem, is given by one of the same group of angels who had the seven bowls. Thus the νυμπηnumphē (Bride) is placed in sharp contrast with the πορνηpornē (Harlot). The New Jerusalem was briefly presented in Revelation 21:2, but now is pictured at length (21:9-22:5) in a nearer and clearer vision.

The bride the wife of the Lamb (την νυμπην την γυναικα του αρνιουtēn numphēn tēn gunaika tou arniou). Twice already the metaphor of the Bride has been used (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:2), here termed “wife” (γυναικαgunaika), mentioned proleptically as in Revelation 19:7 if the marriage is not yet a reality. For the use of the same metaphor elsewhere in the N.T., see note on Revelation 19:7.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-21.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Unto me

Omit.

Vials

Properly bowls. See on Revelation 5:8.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-21.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And there came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and talked with me, saying, Come hither, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb's wife.

And there came one of the seven angels that had the seven phials — Whereby room had been made for the kingdom of God.

Saying, Come, I will show thee the bride — The same angel had before showed him Babylon, Revelation 17:1, which is directly opposed to the new Jerusalem.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-21.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE BRIDE OF CHRIST

‘The Bride, the Lamb’s wife.’

Revelation 21:9

The Church, the Bride of Christ, is not called into existence simply for itself; it is called into existence for the sake of the Bridegroom. The work of the Bride of Christ: ‘Ye shall be witnesses unto Me.’ A husband and wife ought to be one in thought, in character, in work. And that is the idea, that the Church of Christ should be one in thought, in character, and in work with Jesus Christ. What is Jesus Christ’s character? That should be the character of His Church and the different parts of the Church. What is the thought of Jesus Christ? That should be the thought of the Church, the different parts of the Church.

I. The work of the Bride.—Just think of the love of Jesus Christ for the world! Can we estimate it? Can we picture it? Can we even imagine it? And yet if we are one with Him and His Bride, there ought to be in us that same spirit of love and devotion, that keenness for the work that characterised Him.

II. The position of the Bride.—When you are united to Jesus Christ in the closest of all ties as His bride, think what a claim you have upon Him, think what a claim He has upon you. If you are His bride, what has He a right to expect from you? Loyalty to Himself, nothing coming between. What have you a right to expect from Him? Everything. And yet, unfortunately, what do we see over and over again? Men and women not living up to their rank, not realising their privileges.

III. The ambition of the Bride.—Just as a wife looks up to the husband, so the Church must look up to Jesus Christ. Jesus only! That is the cry of the Church, that is the cry of the Christian. Jesus only!

—Rev. J. E. Watts-Ditchfield.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/revelation-21.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

9 And there came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and talked with me, saying, Come hither, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb’s wife.

Ver. 9. One of the seven angels] The same, likely, that, Revelation 17:1, had showed him the damnation of the whore. So studious and officious are the angels to serve the saints, Hebrews 1:14.

The bride, the Lamb’s wife] Uxor fulget radiis mariti, saith the civilian; so is it here.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-21.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

St. John having delivered, before a general account of the saints' happiness in heaven, descends here to a more particular description of it. Heaven, called the New Jerusalem, is represented by a city, with magnificent gates and walls; and the church, the collective body of glorified saints, is here called the Lamb's wife, espoused before, but the marriage solemnized now.

Note here, That as the earthly Jerusalem was a type of the church militant, so the church triumphant is called the New Jerusalem, and compared to a great city for the multitude of its members, and styled holy, because sanctity is the special qualification of those who are the inhabitants of it.

Note, 2. The light which is found in this city; it is not compared to the light of the sun, for that is attended with scorching heat, nor to the light of the moon, which is variable and uncertain, but to the light of precious stones, which is clear and pure, and has nothing annoying in it.

Note, 3. The great safety and security of this city, and of all the citizens inhabiting therein: here is a wall great and high; walls are for defence, (called maenia a muniendo, and the higher the wall the greater the defence: God's omnipotency is as a wall, and will be an invincible bulwark about his saints in heaven: nothing shall endanger them, nothing shall offend them.

Note, 4. Here are twelve gates for conveniency of entrance into this city on all sides, and to give free and easy access from all parts, east, west, north, and south; to signify that the church in heaven will be made up of persons coming from all parts, as Christ foretold, Matthew 8:11; Luke 13:29 They shall come from the east, &c. and shall sit down with Abraham. The triumphant church is a collective body of believers of all nations, kindreds, and people, tongues and languages.

Note lastly, That as the names of workmen are sometimes set upon foundation stones, by which it is well known in after-ages who were the builders; in like manner it is here intimated, that as the ancient Jewish church was founded in twelve patriarchs, so the latter Christian church in and by twelve apostles, Jesus Christ himself being the chief cornerstone, or the foundation of both; he being fundamentum fundans, they fundamenta fundata; teaching us that our faith must be built upon the doctrine of Christ and his apostles, and upon no other doctrine whatsoever, though it has a pretended stamp of infallibility upon it.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-21.html. 1700-1703.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

to Revelation 22:5

Revelation 21:9 to Revelation 22:5. One of the seven vial-angels, another of whom had shown John the judgment of the great harlot,(4281) now carries the seer to a high mountain, in order to afford him a close view of the new Jerusalem. Then there follows the special description which portrays in brightest colors the final goal of Christian hope, and thus puts the glorious end of what is to happen(4282) at the close of the peculiarly revealed visions.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/revelation-21.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

One of the seven angels; one of those mentioned Revelation 15:6.

I will show thee the bride, the Lamb’s wife; I will show thee the whole church, (invisible heretofore), the glorious state of the church triumphant, under the representation of a great city.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-21.html. 1685.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And there came one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls, who were laden with the seven last plagues; and he spake with me, saying, Come hither, I will show thee the bride, the wife of the Lamb.

Some have tried to separate this description of the new Jerusalem by an artificial division between Revelation 21:1-8, and the rest of the prophecy. However, Wilcock demonstrated that the balance of this prophecy is a close-up elaboration of exactly what is included in Revelation 1-8:[21]

<MONO>

Revelation 21:2 = Revelation 21:10-12, the revelation of God's city.

Revelation 21:3 = Revelation 21:22-27, the revelation of God's dwelling.

Revelation 21:4,5a = Revelation 21:1-5, the revelation of God's world renewed.

Revelation 21:5b = Revelation 22:6-10, the revelation of God's word validated.

Revelation 21:6a = Revelation 22:11-15, the revelation of God's work completed.

Revelation 21:6b,7 = Revelation 22:16,17, the revelation of God's final blessing.

Revelation 21:8 = Revelation 22:18,19, the revelation of God's final curse.SIZE>MONO>

In the light of this very logical analysis, we must reject the view of Morris that, "John rounds off his book with a series of somewhat miscellaneous observations,"[22] as well as the interpretation which sees, "Two descents of the city, the first in relation to eternity, the second in relation to the millennium.[23] "It is therefore natural to assume with the vast majority of commentators that Revelation 21:9 to Revelation 22:5 supplies an extended exposition of that paragraph (Revelation 21:1-8).[24]

One of the seven angels ... "We should not overlook the fact that this angel is exactly the one who showed John the judgment of the great whore (Revelation 17:11)."[25] It is probable that this truth, in some way, is important. "It may be that John wishes us to see that the servant of God does not choose his task, but must do whatever God sends him to do."[26]

I will show thee the bride, the Lamb's wife ... This word makes it mandatory to interpret the new Jerusalem as representing the glorified church of Christ.

[21] Michael Wilcock, I Saw Heaven Opened (Downers Grove, Illinois: Inter-Varsity Press, 1975), p. 199.

[22] Leon Morris, op. cit., p. 257.

[23] Charles Caldwell Ryrie, Revelation (Chicago: Moody Press, 1968), p. 120.

[24] G. R. Beasley-Murray, op. cit., p. 315.

[25] Leon Morris, op. cit., p. 248.

[26] William Barclay, op. cit., p. 208.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-21.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

One of the angels with the seven bowls of judgment served as John"s guide in this part of his vision (cf. Revelation 17:1). The fact that one of these particular angels helped John understand both the mystery of Babylon and that of the New Jerusalem sets these two cities in stark contrast.

"It is impossible to dwell both in Babylon and in the new Jerusalem." [Note: Morris, p248.]

It is quite clear that the "bride," the wife of the Lamb, is the New Jerusalem ( Revelation 21:10; cf. Revelation 21:2). Contrast the harlot of Revelation 17:1 (cf. Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:2). From the description that follows it also seems clear that the New Jerusalem is a city. It is not just a person or a group of people, such as Christians. Some have identified it as the church. [Note: E.g, Robert Gundry, "The New Jerusalem: People as Place, not Place for People," Novum Testamentum29:3 (July1987):256.] This is the first of seven references to the Lamb in this section ( Revelation 21:9; Revelation 21:14; Revelation 21:22-23; Revelation 21:27; Revelation 22:1; Revelation 22:3). He becomes increasingly prominent as the book draws to a close. "The Lamb is all the glory in Immanuel"s land." [Note: "Immanuel"s Land" by Anne Ross Cousin.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-21.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 21:9. At chap. Revelation 17:1 one of the angels that had the seven bowls had come to the Seer and shown him the great harlot that sitteth upon many waters, the mystic Babylon. In like manner one of the same group of angels, but more fully described as one of the seven who had the seven bowls, who were laden with the seven last plagues, now shows him the city that was in every respect the contrast of Babylon, not Babylon but the New Jerusalem, not a harlot but the bride the Lamb’s wife. The fuller description of the angel brings out more completely the fact that the last ‘plagues’ were over, and that nothing remained to be exhibited to the Seer but the glory of the redeemed in heaven. The combination of the terms ‘bride’ and ‘Lamb’s wife’ is remarkable. The Church is not only espoused but married to her Lord, yet she remains for ever in a virgin purity.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-21.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

I will shew thee the bride, the wife of the Lamb: all the Church triumphant in heaven. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-21.html. 1859.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

This may be the same angel as in Revelation 17:1. It appears the rest of this chapter and most of the next are a more detailed view of things discussed in verses 1-7.

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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-21.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

unto me. The texts omit.

seven . . . plagues. See Revelation 16:1.

talked. App-121.

bride. Greek. numphe. See Revelation 21:2. Matthew 10:35. Luke 12:63. John 3:29. John 18:23; John 22:17. The "wife" and the "bride" here must not be confused with "the wife" of Revelation 19:7. The wife of Revelation 19:7 is Israel, called out from all the nations for blessing in the Land, the earthly consort of "the great King" (compare Psa 45. Jeremiah 3:14). The "bride, the Lamb"s wife" here is still of Israel, but that Israel of the "heavenly calling" (Hebrews 3:1); all those connected with the "heavenly" country and "the city which hath the foundations", for which "they looked" (Hebrews 11:13-16). See App-197.

wife. Greek. gune, always rend. "wife", or "woman". The wife of Revelation 19:7 is not called numphe. Here she is both numphe and gune (first occurrence Matthew 1:20). See App-197.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-21.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And there came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and talked with me, saying, Come hither, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb's wife.

The angel who showed John Babylon, the harlot, appropriately shows him, in contrast, new Jerusalem, the Bride (Revelation 17:1-5). The angel is the one that had the seven last plagues, to show that the ultimate blessedness of the Church is one end of the divine judgments on her foes.

Unto me. 'Aleph (') A B, Vulgate, omit.

The Lamb's wife - in contrast to her who sat on many waters (Revelation 17:1); i:e., intrigued with many peoples of the world, instead of giving her undivided affections, as the Bride, to the Lamb.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-21.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

THE HEAVENLY JERUSALEM DESCRIBED (Revelation 21:9 to Revelation 22:5).—Before entering upon this section it is wise to recall once more that the descriptions here given are figurative, and are not to be understood literally. “There is nothing in it as it seems saving the King.” This remark may well be thought needless; but the misconceptions and misrepresentations of the Christian’s hope have been many and reckless; and, even were this not the case, there is always a certain proportion of people who seem incapable of understanding figurative language. Half the errors of the Church have been due to prosaic-minded men who could not discern the difference between figure and fact; and men of unpoetical and vehement temperament have blundered over these descriptions, and their blunders have discredited the whole Apocalypse in the eyes of some. The following are the features of the heavenly city, which the description seems designed to enforce upon our thoughts. The great and holy community will be one which draws its glory from God (Revelation 21:11; Revelation 21:23; Revelation 22:5). Its blessings are not for a few, but open to all, for its gates lie open to all quarters (Revelation 21:12-13). The heavenly and the earthly will be at one; angels, apostles, and patriarchs are there (Revelation 21:12; Revelation 21:14). Diverse characters will find entrance there; the gates bear the names of the twelve tribes. The door of admission is alike for all, though diverse characters from diverse quarters will enter in (Revelation 21:21). It will be the abode of all that is fair and good, and no disproportions will mar its loveliness (Revelation 21:17-18). The ancient truths, spoken by various lips, will be found to be eternal truths, full of varied but consistent beauty (Revelation 21:14; Revelation 21:19-20). The forms and helps which were needful here will not be needful there (Revelation 21:22-23); all that the servants of God have righteously hungered and thirsted for here will be supplied there (Revelation 22:1-2). There will be blessings, various, continuous, eternal; new fields of labour and new possibilities of service will be opened there (Revelation 22:3-4).

(9) And there came unto me one of the seven angels . . .—The words “unto me” should be omitted. One of the seven angels which had the seven vials of wrath had shown to the seer the scarlet-clad harlot, the great and guilty Babylon: so here does one of the same company of angels show him the pure Bride of the Lamb, the new and holy Jerusalem.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-21.html. 1905.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

(3) The description of the massive dimensions of the great city, the holy new Jerusalem--21:9-17.

The original designation for Jerusalem was the name Salem, mentioned Psalms 76:2, and it meant the possession of peace, or the inheritance of peace. It was the most important city of biblical history, and the most sacred and the most desecrated of the whole world. The Psalmist of Israel sang its praises; but Christ the Saviour wept tears of sorrow over its apostasies, unfaithfulness and approaching desolation. (Matthew 23:37-38)

The Jerusalem of the time of Christ and the apostles and people of the New Testament lies buried beneath the ruins of the succeeding centuries; and the Jerusalem which was the city of David is buried far deeper below the surface of modern Jerusalem. In the fifteen centuries of its existence from its first appearance in Old Testament history until its destruction in A. D. 70 it had been besieged some fifteen or twenty times, was twice razed and burned, and twice its walls were crumbled by enemy attacks. There is not the slightest feature remaining today of its ancient glory.

Under Solomon the city of David attained its highest fame and greatest grandeur, as the result of the wise king's accomplishments of the building of the magnificent temple and royal palace, and the extension and strengthening of its massive walls. With a vast army of skilled craftsmen the enormous workmanship that entered into its erection was completed, and the venerated temple with its splendorous sanctuary was dedicated within seven and one-half years. This was in wide contrast with the gradual work on Herod"s temple, standing in the time of Christ, which required "forty and six years" to complete. (John 2:20) It was in king Solomon's reign, due to these accomplishments, that Jerusalem became the one central place of all the world for the true worship of God. It was the Mecca of the Jews, the holy city, and whether near or far, at home or in foreign land, the devoted Jew prayed with his face toward Jerusalem.

Captured by the Roman Pompey in B. C. 63, the land of the Jews was again subjugated and became a province of the Caesars. Approximately twenty years later, B. C. 40, the city fell to the Parthians, under Antigonus; but only one year later Herod the Great laid siege to the city, and supported by the Roman army the citadel and the temple were recaptured by storm; and Herod was afterward made king of Judea by the Romans. He at once improved and beautified the city, and initiated the enlargement and refurbishing of the temple without and within, requiring the period of forty-six years as mentioned in the gospel record of John. Under the rule of Herod the restoration of Jerusalem and the temple approximated their ancient magnificence.

The Jerusalem of the New Testament times stood with all the imposing grandeur and strength to which it had been brought by Herod through nearly a half-century of workmanship, with all of its multiple walls and structures. It was after the death of Herod Agrippa, the grandson of Herod the Great, that the province of Judea was again ruled by oppressive provincial Roman procurators, and Jerusalem became the ground for the scenes of discontent, violent insurrections and political rebellion. It is no wonder that her apostasies and abominations should become the object of the Patmos visions to signify the Harlot; and it is not strange that the once holy city should be the type of the New Jerusalem, the Bride and church of Christ the Lamb.

With this excursion we return to the apocalyptic description of the Great City, the Holy New Jerusalem, which begins with verse nine of chapter twenty-one.

This vision of the Holy City was in contrast with the vision of Babylon The Great, The Mother Of Harlots And Abominations Of The Earth of chapter seventeen. There one of the angels of judgment showed John the Harlot City (the old Jerusalem) which had become the mother of the abominations of the earth (Palestine) by her many apostasies; as lamented by Jesus Christ himself in the twenty-third and the twenty-fourth chapters of Matthew.

In the vision of chapter twenty-one, now under consideration, the same angels showed John the Holy City. They were hitherto the executioners of divine wrath and judgment; but here they were the administrators of divine love and reward. In comparison, the angels in the two chapters (17 and 21) used the same identification in the language describing their functions, but for a different mission. In chapters seventeen to nineteen these angels were on the mission of pronouncing judgment upon the Harlot Woman; but in chapter twenty-one the mission of the same angels was to exhibit the Holy City, the Bride.

It was appropriate that the angels pronouncing the doom on the old Jerusalem of Judaism should also announce the blessings of triumph awaiting the New Jerusalem Bride. The chapter is a continuation of the vial-angel visions, culminating in the glorious success of the church in the heathen world.

1. Come hither, I will show thee the bride, the Lamb's wife--21:9. This beckoning of the angel is another proof, among the many others in the contexts of these chapters, that the descriptions of the holy city were not visions of heaven the home of the soul, but of the glorious church of Christ, designated the bride and the wife of the Lamb, redeemed from tribulation, but yet to fulfill her divine mission on the earth.

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Bibliographical Information
Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-21.html. 1966.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And there came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and talked with me, saying, Come hither, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb's wife.
which
15:1-7; 16:1-17
the Lamb's
2; 19:7
Reciprocal: Psalm 45:9 - queen;  Song of Solomon 4:9 - my spouse;  Song of Solomon 6:9 - The daughters;  Isaiah 61:10 - as a;  Isaiah 62:4 - Beulah;  Hosea 2:19 - And I will;  Matthew 25:1 - the bridegroom;  Mark 2:20 - the bridegroom;  John 1:29 - Behold;  John 3:29 - hath;  Romans 7:4 - that ye;  Revelation 15:7 - seven;  Revelation 17:1 - one;  Revelation 22:17 - the bride

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-21.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The original angel who came to John at the beginning of the vision has not left the isle, but occasionally there will be an extra conversation permitted for some one or more of the other persons introduced from time to time, For instance, one of the elders ( Revelation 5:5), the beasts or living creatures ( Revelation 6:1; Revelation 6:3; Revelation 6:5; Revelation 6:7), the voice from heaven ( Revelation 10:8), one of the seven angels ( Revelation 17:1) and the one in our verse. John heard many other voices from time to time, but the ones to which reference is made talked to him. This angel of our verse invited John to see a vision of the bride, the Lamb"s wife.

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Bibliographical Information
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-21.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 21:9

Revelation 21:9 And there came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and talked with me, saying, Come hither, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb's wife.

This, probably, is the same angel that showed John the vision of the great whore, { Revelation 17:1} who now shows him

the bride, the Lamb's Wife

{see Revelation 19:7-8} that Isaiah, the true visible church of God, as Revelation 21:1-2 See the exposition of those two verses; See KNOLLYS: Revelation 21:1 & See KNOLLYS: Revelation 21:2 and here also, Revelation 21:10 See KNOLLYS: Revelation 21:10

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Bibliographical Information
Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-21.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 21:9. And there came one of the seven angels, who have the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and spake with me and said, Come, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb's wife. The reason why the function of shewing should be given to one of the angels, who had the seven vials, may be seen at ch. Revelation 17:1.

The prefixed epithet, "the bride," serves to determine more exactly what follows, "the Lamb's wife;" it shews, that we are to understand thereby the betrothed (comp. at ch. Revelation 19:7). That the bride of the Lamb is here spoken of (in allusion to the Song, comp. ch. Revelation 3:20[Note: Vitringa: Phrasis haec est cantici Solomonis, ch. 4:8 9, 5:1, qua teneritudo amoris Christi erga ecclesiam depingitur.]), shews that the glory of the church is here beheld in its becoming and beginning; and corresponds to the circumstance of the prophet seeing, in Revelation 21:10, as in Revelation 21:2, the new Jerusalem coming down. The coming down is in a manner the bridal procession.

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-21.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

c. Description of the capital of the heavenly earth—the New Jerusalem, Revelation 21:9-27.

9.One of the seven angels—As the millennium occurs between this and the last mention of this angel, it was at least a thousand years ago in the event. But in the narrative of the panorama it was, perhaps, an hour.

The bride, the Lamb’s wife—The holy Church, which has now passed through the resurrection to her glorified state. Note Revelation 19:7.

 

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 21:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-21.html. 1874-1909.