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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Romans 13:13

Let us behave properly as in the day, not in carousing and drunkenness, not in sexual promiscuity and sensuality, not in strife and jealousy.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Let us walk honestly, as in the day - Let us walk, ευσχημονες, decently, from εν, well, and σχημα, mien, habit, or dress. Let our deportment be decent, orderly, and grave; such as we shall not be ashamed of in the eyes of the whole world.

Not in rioting, and drunkenness - Μη κωμοις και μεθαις· Κωμος, rioting, according to Hesychius, signifies ασελγη ᾳσματα, πορνικα συμποσια, ῳδαι, unclean and dissolute songs, banquets, and such like. Μεθαις signifies drunken festivals, such as were celebrated in honor of their gods, when after they had sacrificed (μετα το θυειν, Suidas) they drank to excess, accompanied with abominable acts of every kind. See Suidas and Hesychius, under this word.

Not in chambering - This is no legitimate word, and conveys no sense till, from its connection in this place, we force a meaning upon it. The original word, κοιταις, signifies whoredoms and prostitution of every kind.

And wantonness - Ασελγειαις, All manner of uncleanness and sodomitical practices.

Not in strife and envying - Μη εριδι και ζηλῳ, Not in contentions and furious altercations, which must be the consequence of such practices as are mentioned above. Can any man suppose that this address is to the Christians at Rome? That they are charged with practices almost peculiar to the heathens? And practices of the most abandoned and dissolute sort? If those called Christians at Rome were guilty of such acts, there could be no difference except in profession, between them and the most abominable of the heathens. But it is impossible that such things should be spoken to the followers of Christ; for the very grace that brings repentance enables the penitent to cast aside and abominate all such vicious and abominable conduct.

The advices to the Christians may be found in the preceding chapter; those at the conclusion of this chapter belong solely to the heathens.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/romans-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Let us walk - To “walk” is an expression denoting “to live;” let us “live,” or “conduct,” etc.

Honestly - The word used here means rather in a “decent‘ or “becoming” manner; in a manner “appropriate” to those who are the children of light.

As in the day - As if all our actions were seen and known. People by day, or in open light, live decently; their foul and wicked deeds are done in the night. The apostle exhorts Christians to live as if all their conduct were seen, and they had nothing which they wished to conceal.

In rioting - Revelling; denoting the licentious conduct, the noisy and obstreperous mirth, the scenes of disorder and sensuality, which attend luxurious living.

Drunkenness - Rioting and drunkenness constitute the “first” class of sins from which he would keep them. It is scarcely necessary to add that these were common crimes among the pagan.

In chambering - “Lewd, immodest behavior.” (Webster.) The Greek word includes illicit indulgences of all kinds, adultery, etc. The words chambering and wantonness constitute the “second” class of crimes from which the apostle exhorts Christians to abstain. That these were common crimes among the pagan, it is not necessary to say; see the Ephesians 5:12 note. It is not possible, nor would it be proper, to describe the scenes of licentious indulgence of which all pagans are guilty. Since Christians were to be a special people, therefore the apostle enjoins on them purity and holiness of life.

Not in strife - Strife and envying are the “third” class of sins from which the apostle exhorts them. The word “strife” means “contention, disputes, litigations.” The exhortation is that they should live in peace.

Envying - Greek, Zeal. It denotes any intense, vehement, “fervid” passion. It is not improperly rendered here by envying. These vices are properly introduced in connection with the others. They usually accompany each other. Quarrels and contentions come out of scenes of drunkenness and debauchery. But for such scenes, there would be little contention, and the world would be comparatively at peace.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/romans-13.html. 1870.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

Letus walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying.

Let us walk honestly, as in the day. — According to the present use of the language, ‘honestly’ does not adequately represent the original. The word signifies decently, becomingly. We are by this precept required to conduct ourselves before the world in a modest, decent, and becoming manner. The allusion is to persons walking from place to place in transacting their daily business. The conduct of persons thus employed shows, even in people the most immoral, some regard to appearances; and they who riot in the night will place a restraint on their conduct in the day. Christians, then, as in the light of day, ought to conduct themselves in a manner suitable to the day, and not like those who riot in the night. It may be observed that the same figure is here still continued, but varied in its application. When it is said that the night is far spent, and the day is at hand, it is implied that it was still night, and that the day was future. But here the day is present. In one point of view it is night to the Christian, and in another it is day. Not in, rioting. — The word applies to all meetings for intemperance and debauchery. It denounces all amusements that minister to the impure passions of human nature, whatever may be their name. The fashionable follies of high life, and those practiced by persons in inferior stations, are alike inconsistent with the Christian character and with this precept. It is vain to allege with respect to them that they are not expressly condemned in Scripture. The Scripture does not give out law with a verbose phraseology, like the laws of men, but condemns all the particular and ever-varying follies of mankind in every age and nation on general principles. Drunkenness. — This sin is one of the greatest destroyers of mankind.

Even were there no hereafter, a wise man would shun it as a pestilence. No other evil has so great a share in bringing ruin on individuals and families.

Every approach to it ought to be most carefully avoided. Too much caution cannot be used in order to guard against the formation of habits of intemperance. Many a promising professor of Christianity makes shipwreck of the faith by giving way to this vice. It is a mistaken hospitality that tempts to any approach to intemperance. If we are to eat and drink to the glory of God, we ought to drink no more than is really useful for the health. Chambering. — The meaning of this is plain, as well as of wantonness, which refers to all licentiousness, in its most extensive import. Strife and envy. — The former applies to every kind of contention; and the latter designates that principle which, more than any other, excites to strife or contention, and tends to make a man an enemy to his kind.


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Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/romans-13.html. 1835.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Let us walk becomingly, as in the day; not in reveling and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and jealousy.

Becomingly, as in the day ... suggests the beauty and adornment of Christian behavior, which is of a kind not to be ashamed of in broad open daylight, contrasting sharply with the Gentile debaucheries usually committed at night, and therefore called the works of darkness (Romans 13:12). Deeds that are becoming to Christians are those of virtue, integrity, faithfulness, purity, and love. It was becoming of Christ to fulfill all righteousness (Matthew 3:15). Even the discussion of gross sins was forbidden to Christians upon the ground that such guarding of the conversation "becometh saints" (Ephesians 5:3). A further glimpse of the meaning of "becometh" is seen in the word chosen to replace it in the various translations. "Worthy of" (Philippians 1:27) and "befitting" (Titus 2:1) are two examples.

Revelling and drunkenness ... refers to riotous and boisterous conduct, such as undisciplined behavior that follows indulgence in alcoholic beverages. Anyone familiar with this type of behavior will testify to its obscene, profane, and repulsive nature.

Chambering and wantonness ... as retained in the English Revised Version from the KJV, mean "debauchery and licentiousness" (RSV), or "debauchery and vice" (New English Bible).

Strife and jealousy ... refer to the animosities of men inflamed with liquor, sated with vice, and living the lives of debauchees. To say that such conduct does not become Christians must have been intended by the apostle as a meiosis, an understatement for the sake of emphasis.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/romans-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Let us walk honestly as in the day,.... Being under the day of the Gospel dispensation, and the day of grace having dawned, and the daystar of spiritual light and knowledge being risen in our hearts, and we being exposed to the view of all men in broad daylight, ought not to lie down and sleep, but to arise and be active, and walk decently with the armour of light on us, as becomes the Gospel of Christ; not naked and unclothed, which would expose us and the Gospel to shame and contempt:

not in rioting; the Syriac and Arabic versions read, "in singing", or "songs"; meaning lewd ones, sung at riotous feasts and banquets, made not for refreshment, but for pleasure and debauchery, what the RomansF9Seutonius in Vita Vitell. c. 13. call "comessations"; feasts after supper in the night season, and design all sorts of nocturnal revels: "Comus", the word here used, is with the Heathens the god of feasts, perhaps the same with "Chemosh", the god of the Moabites, 1 Kings 11:33.

And drunkenness; which always attended such unseasonable and immoderate festivals:

not in chambering; in unlawful copulations, fornication, adultery, and all the defilements of the bed:

and wantonness; lasciviousness, unnatural lusts, as sodomy, &c.

not in strife and envying; contention and quarrels, which are usually the consequences of luxury and uncleanness.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/romans-13.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Let us walk honestly — “becomingly,” “seemingly”

as in the day — “Men choose the night for their revels, but our night is past, for we are all the children of the light and of the day (1 Thessalonians 5:5): let us therefore only do what is fit to be exposed to the light of such a day.”

not in rioting and drunkenness — varied forms of intemperance; denoting revels in general, usually ending in intoxication.

not in chambering and wantonness — varied forms of impurity; the one pointing to definite acts, the other more general.

not in strife and envying — varied forms of that venomous feeling between man and man which reverses the law of love.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/romans-13.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Honestly (ευσχημονωςeuschēmonōs). Paul is fond of the metaphor “walk” (περιπατεωperipateō), 33 times though not in the Pastoral Epistles. This old adverb (from ευσχημωνeuschēmōn graceful) occurs also in 1 Thessalonians 4:12; 1 Corinthians 14:40. The English word “honest” means honourable (Latin honor) and so decent. Wycliffe translates 1 Corinthians 12:23 by “unhonest,” “honesty,” “honest” for “less honourable, honour, honourable.”

Not in revelling (μη κωμοιςmē kōmois). Plural “revellings.” See Galatians 5:21.

Drunkenness (methais). Plural again, “drunkennesses.” See Galatians 5:21.

In chambering (koitais). Plural also. See Romans 9:10.

Wantonness (μεταιςaselgeiais). Plural likewise. See 2 Corinthians 12:21; Galatians 5:19.

Not in strife and jealousy (mē eridi kai zēlōi). Singular here, but some MSS. have the plural like the previous words. Quarrelling and jealousy go with the other vices (Shedd).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/romans-13.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Honestly ( εὐσχημόνως )

Honest is originally honorable, and so here. Compare Wyclif's version of 1 Corinthians 12:23: “And the members that be unhonest have more honesty; for our honest members have need of none.” From εὐ well σχῆμα fashionSee on Matthew 17:2. Hence becomingly. Compare 1 Corinthians 14:40; 1 Thessalonians 4:12. The word refers more particularly to the outward life, and thus accords with walk, and in the day the time of observation.

Rioting ( κώμοις )

Lit., revellings. See on 1 Peter 4:3.

Drunkenness ( μέθαις )

See on Luke 21:34; see on John 2:10.

Wantonness ( ἀσελγείαις )

See on lasciviousness, Mark 7:22. All these three are plural: riotings, drunkennesses, wantonnesses.

Envying ( ζήλω )

Rev., jealousy. See on James 3:14.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/romans-13.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying.

Banqueting — Luxurious, elegant feasts.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/romans-13.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

13.Not in reveling, etc. He mentions here three kinds of vices, and to each he has given two names, — intemperant and excess in living, — carnal lust and uncleanness, which is connected with it, — and envy and contention. If these have in them so much filthiness, that even carnal men are ashamed to commit them before the eyes of men, it behooves us, who are in the light of God, at all times to abstain from them; yea, even when we are withdrawn from the presence of men. As to the third vice, though contention is put before envying, there is yet. no doubt but that Paul intended to remind us, that strifes and contests arise from this fountain; for when any one seeks to excel, there is envying of one another; but ambition is the source of both evils. (411)


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/romans-13.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

13 Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying.

Ver. 13. Let us walk honestly] Handsomely, fashionably, mannerly, with a holy shamefacedness ( ευσχημονως).

Not in chambering] Properly, lying a-bed or long-lying ( κοιταις).


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/romans-13.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Romans 13:13. Let us walk honestly ' Ευσχημονως, honourably, or gracefully. Dr. Milner renders the passage, Let us walk with a grace. The word for chambering is κοιταις, which Leigh explains of lying long in bed. It implies effeminacy and luxury of that kind. The word ασελγεια, rendered wantonness, properly signifies a soft and dissolute manner of life, attended with an affected delicacy, very detrimental to that resolution which is so necessary an ingredient in the character of one who would approve himself a good soldier of Jesus Christ. The general meaning may be, "Do not indulge any intemperate lewd conversation among your heathen acquaintance, nor any strife or envy against your Christian brethren." See Doddridge, Stockius, and Milner's "Fading Flowers of Life," p. 38.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/romans-13.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

13.] κοίταις, in a bad sense: the act itself being a defilement, when unsanctified by God’s ordinance of marriage. See reff.

ἀσελγείαις, plural of various kinds of wantonness: so ὑποκρίσεις, φθόνους, καταλαλιάς, 1 Peter 2:1.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/romans-13.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 13:13. ὡς ἐν ἡμέρᾳ] as one walks in the day (when one avoids everything unbecoming). This in a moral sense, Paul desires, should be the ruling principle of the Christian, who sees the day already dawning (Romans 13:12).

εὐσχημόνως] becomingly, 1 Thessalonians 4:12; 1 Corinthians 7:35; 1 Corinthians 14:40. It is moral decorum of conduct.

κώμοις κ. τ. λ.] The datives are explained from the notion of the way and manner in which the περιπατεῖν, i.e. the inner and outward conduct of life, ought not to take place (Kühner, II. 1, p. 382), namely, not with revellings ( κώμοις; see respecting this, on Galatians 5:21; Welker in Jacobs, Philostr. i. 2, p. 202 ff.) and carousals (comp. Galatians 5:21), etc. The local view (Philippi) is less in keeping with the particulars mentioned, and that of dativus commodi (Fritzsche, comp. van Hengel) less befits the figurative verb.

κοίταις] congressibus venereis (comp. on Romans 9:10), Wisdom of Solomon 3:13, and see Kypke, II. p. 185.

ἀσελγείαις] wantonnesses (especially of lust). See Tittmann, Synon. p. 151. On the sense of the plural, see Lucian, Amor. 21: ἵνα μηδὲν ἀγνοῇ μέρος ἀσελγείας.

ζήλῳ] jealousy (1 Corinthians 1:11; 1 Corinthians 3:3); neither anger (Fritzsche, Philippi, and others), which is not denoted by ζῆλος (not even in 1 Corinthians 3:2; 2 Corinthians 12:20; Galatians 5:20), nor envy (Photius, Luther, and others), which is less in accordance with the preceding ( κοίτ. κ. ἀσελγ.), whilst strife and jealousy follow in the train of the practice of lust.

The three particulars adduced stand in the internal connection of cause and effect.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/romans-13.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Romans 13:13.(141) εὐσχημόνως) with good clothing (honestly, Engl. Vers., in the archaic sense, = becomingly; in becoming attire).— κώμοις καὶ μέθαις, not in riotings and drunkenness) as to ourselves. κῶμος, feasting, a lascivious banquet, with dancing and various disorderly acts.—Wisdom of Solomon 14:23; 2 Maccabees 6:4.— κοίταις καὶ ἀσελγείαις, in chamberings and wantonness) accompanied with others.— ἔριδι καὶ ζήλῳ, in strife and envying) directed against others. In Romans 13:13-14, there is a chiasmus:(142) α. not in riotingβ. not in strife and envying: γ. but put on, in love [opposed to strife, and inseparable from Christ], the Lord Jesus Christ— δ. and—not—for the lusts. β and γ correspond, α and δ.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/romans-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Let its walk honestly, as in the day: q.d. Let us behave ourselves decently, and with a holy shamefacedness, as becomes those to whom the grace of God, and the glorious light of the gospel, hath appeared. This honest walking is expressed by three adverbs in Titus 2:12; i.e. soberly, righteously, godly. He enumerates divers vices, which are contrary to this honest walking, and he sets them down by pairs. He makes three pairs of them: the first is

rioting and drunkenness; by which he means intemperance, or excess in eating and drinking: see Luke 21:34. The second is

chambering and wantonness; by which he means actual uncleanness, and all lustful and lascivious dalliances: see Galatians 5:19 Ephesians 5:3 Colossians 3:5 1 Thessalonians 4:3-5,7 1 Peter 4:3. The third pair is

strife and envying. All these vices are twisted and connected: intemperance causeth uncleanness, and both cause contention and emulation, Proverbs 23:29,30. The famous St. Augustine confesseth, that he was converted by reading and pondering this text.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Romans 13:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/romans-13.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Walk honestly; live in a manner becoming disciples of Christ hastening to eternity, and preparing for heaven. See note to chap Romans 12:17.

Rioting and drunkenness; intemperance.

Chambering and wantonness; licentiousness.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/romans-13.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

13. ὡς ἐν ἡμέρᾳ κ.τ.λ. The conduct (περιπ.) must befit the day and its occupations.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/romans-13.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13. Walk—The rapid apostle now changes his figure from that of war to revelry.

Walk honestly—That is, walk becomingly or decently; not like revellers who race shamefully through the nightly streets.

Rioting—In the streets. Drunkenness—In the drinking houses.

Chambering—Literally, beds; that is, of debauchery.

Wantonness—Loose immorality of any kind.

Strife and envying—Vices more decent, but not less malignant.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/romans-13.html. 1874-1909.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

13. “Let us walk circumspectly as in the day; not in revelries and drunkenness, not in debaucheries and impurities, not in strife and jealousy, but put you on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the lusts of the flesh.” “Salvation” (Romans 13:11) is in the final sense, involving glorification of spirit, soul and body. Justification is primary salvation, sanctification full salvation, and glorification final salvation. The apostle and his saintly contemporaries were on the constant lookout for the Lord to return and translate them to heaven, soul, mind and body all simultaneously glorified. The first day in the divine calendar was Eden blooming in its glory. This halcyon day went into dark eclipse when humanity fell, so remaining to the present day, Satan’s dreary night intervening and throwing its dark shadows over the whole earth, foreboding doom and damnation already about six thousand awful years, chronicling the fate of multiplied millions, amid the darkness deceived by the devil and plunged into hell. Glory to God, the star gleams of God’s millennial day, already heralded by the Holiness Movement, the bright morning stars shining in every land, are already bespangling every sky with the hallowed effulgence in Aurora splendors anticipating the glorious Son of Righteousness rising upon this dark world with healing in His wings, bringing back the Eden beauties, again to girdle the globe with the delectable splendors of God’s millennial day. If in Paul’s time Satan’s night “was far spent” and God’s millennial day drawing nigh, oh how pre-eminently true it is now, since we are eighteen hundred years nearer to the glorious fulfillment of this inspiring Pauline prophecy. If it was pertinent then for them to “awake out of sleep” and regale themselves for translation, amid the retreat of Satan’s night and the glorious dawn of God’s millennial day, how infinitely more so is it now pertinent that we all awake, wash and dress and look out for our coming King! The preparation now as then is entire sanctification, expurgatory of all the debris of inbred sin, clothing us with the Lord Jesus Christ, so that people see, not our bodies, but our clothes, and utterly lose sight of us, and oblivious to our personalities, see Jesus only whithersoever we go.


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Godbey, William. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/romans-13.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Let us walk becomingly, as in the day; not in revelling (disorderly behaviour) and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and jealousy,’

One consequence of putting on the armour of light is that we will walk becomingly as in the day, as men do walk when they are under scrutiny. It is to walk in godliness and purity and true love, eschewing excesses which take place when it is dark. It is to put on the LORD Jesus Christ. Such works of darkness which have to be eschewed include revelling and drunkenness as people let themselves go at parties, they include free unrestricted sexual behaviour, they include being at loggerheads with others, and what results from jealousy of others.

Christians therefore are to‘walk becomingly, as in the day.’They have left behind the darkness of night and live in the light of the Day of the Messiah which has dawned. This picture of the Christian life as ‘walking in the light’ is a common one in the New Testament. It was introduced by Jesus in John 8:12 when He said, ‘I am the light of the world. He who follows Me will not walk in darkness but will have the light of life’. There He is revealed as present as the light which is to guide those who follow Him in their walk. And His purpose was that all should come to His light. It was for any who would respond. As He repeated in John 12:46, ‘I am come a light into the world, that whoever believes on me may not abide in darkness’. Thus He called on believers to ‘Walk while you have the light --- while you have the light, believe on the light, that you might become the sons of light’ (John 12:35-36). All this points to seeing Him as the light, in consequence of which, having received from Him the light of eternal life, we are to walk continually in His light and in the light of His teaching. In accordance with this we should therefore all be walking in His light, living our lives in the radiance of the light of His presence, and knowing that all things are open to the eyes of Him with Whom we have to do.

Paul also uses the same idea elsewhere. ‘You were once in darkness, but now you are light in the Lord, walk as children of light, for the fruit of the light is in all goodness and righteousness and truth’ (Ephesians 5:8-9). And he adds, ‘You are all the children of the light, and the children of the day. We are not of the night or of the darkness’ (1 Thessalonians 5:5). Note the paralleling of ‘the light’ and ‘the day’. To walk in the day is to walk in His light. So those who walk as children of the day, as children of light, will produce the fruit of goodness and truth, because if their lives are being lived in His continual light, and in the light of His word, that light, like the sun, will shine on them and produce fruitfulness, and it will allow nothing of the darkness to survive.

John continues in similar vein. However, in his case he recognises, as Paul did in Romans 6-7, that in walking in that light there will be things revealed that need forgiveness, so he assures his readers, ‘If we walk in the light as He is in the light, (openly admitting our sin daily), we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ, God’s Son goes on cleansing us from all sin’ (1 John 1:7).

Walking in the light is thus to be very much a part of the Christian life. But because of the cleansing of the blood of Jesus we do not need to be afraid of the light. Rather we should embrace it, and, as we come continually to Him day by day, ask that the searchlight of His presence might shine on us continually. Then it will lead the way before us so that all that is of darkness is put away. In that way we will be ready for that Day.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/romans-13.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Our behavior, and specially those things Paul called on his readers to do in Romans 13:1-10, should be distinctively Christian since we live among unbelievers. The practices he urged us to avoid here were common in Corinth where Paul wrote this epistle. He observed them constantly. Intemperance often leads to sexual sin that frequently results in contention and quarreling. [Note: See Lpez, "A Study . . ."]


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/romans-13.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 13:13. Let us walk seemly, as in the day. Both ‘honestly’ (E. V.) and ‘decently’ (E. V. margin) are too limited, the reference being to decorum, such as befits the day when conduct is open to observation.

Not in rioting and drunkenness. The former refers to nocturnal revels, and was probably suggested by the figures of ‘night’ and ‘day;’ the latter means drunken carousals; both are plural in the original.

Not in chambering and wantonness. Various forms of secret vice are here indicated by the plural. These sins are closely connected with the preceding, often caused by them. In Galatians 5:19; Ephesians 4:19 and elsewhere, the word rendered ‘wanton ness’ occurs, but is translated ‘lasciviousness.’ It points to an abandoned sensuality.

Not in strife and jealousy. These follow in the train of sensuality, as Roman life was then testifying most sadly. (‘Envying’ is inexact.) The entire family of vices is well-known, and the relationship obvious.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/romans-13.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Romans 13:13. ὡς ἐν ἡμέρᾳ: as one walks in the day, so let us walk εὐσχημόνως. The same adverb is found with the same verb in 1 Thessalonians 4:2 : A.V. in both places “honestly”. The meaning is rather “in seemly fashion,” “becomingly”; in 1 Corinthians 14:40 it is rendered “decently,” where also regard for decorum (the aesthetic side of morality) is in view. κῶμοι and μέθαι are again found conjoined in Galatians 5:21; ἔρις and ζῆλος in Galatians 5:20 and 1 Corinthians 3:3. W. and H. following . put ἔρισι καὶ ζήλοις in margin; the plurals in this case as in the others would indicate the various acts or manifestations of excess, whether in self-indulgence or self-will.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/romans-13.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Romans 13:13. Let us walk honestly — Greek, ευσχημονως, decently, or in a manner becoming those to whom the glorious light of the gospel has appeared: as in the day — Namely, of gospel light, already shining about us, which requires that we conduct ourselves with great wisdom, and exemplary holiness; not in rioting — Greek, κωμοις, a word derived from Comos, the god of feasting and revelling; that is, feasting with lascivious songs, accompanied with music. “These revellings among the heathen were performed in honour of Bacchus, the god of wine, who, on that account, was named κωμαστης, Comastes, and were acted in the night-time, for the most part without arms. However, the actors in these revellings were sometimes armed, and insulted those whom they happened to meet. The youth among the heathen, especially in cities, when they were enamoured, used, after they had got themselves drunk, to run about the streets by night, having crowns made of the branches and leaves of trees upon their heads, and torches in their hands, with musical instruments of various kinds, upon which some of them played soft airs, while others accompanied them with their voice, and danced in the most lascivious manner. These indecencies they acted commonly before the house in which their mistress lived, then knocked at the door, and sometimes brake in. Hence, in the book of Wisdom, they are called, chap. Romans 14:23, εμμανεις κωμους, mad revellings.” From all this it appears with what propriety the apostle joins μεθαι, drunkenness, and the other vices here mentioned, together, and opposes τα οπλα του φωτος, the instruments, or weapons of light, to these nocturnal dresses and revellings. See Macknight. Not in chambering — In fornication, adultery, and fleshly lusts. The original expression, κοιταις, is interpreted by Leigh, of lying long in bed. “I will not defend that sense of the word,” says Dr. Doddridge; “but I will here record the observation which I have found of great use to myself, and to which, I may say, that the production of this work, and most of my other writings, is owing; namely, that the difference between rising at five and at seven o’clock in the morning, for the space of forty years, supposing a man to go to bed at the same hour of the night, is nearly equivalent to the addition of ten years to a man’s life; of which, (supposing the two hours in question to be so spent,) eight hours every day should be employed in study and devotion.” And wantonness ασελγειαις, lasciviousness, any kind of uncleanness, or lewd practices. In vices, alas! such as those here censured by the apostle, many, even professing Christians, are wasting and polluting the hours which nature has destined to necessary repose. Not in strife and envying — In contention about riches, or honours, or opinions; or envying the prosperity of others.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/romans-13.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

===============================

[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Non in cubilibus, Greek: me koitais, which may signify beds, chambers, or immodest actions.

====================


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/romans-13.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Romans 13:13 Let us walk becomingly, as in the day; not in revelling and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and jealousy.

"walk becomingly"-"behave properly" (NASV). While Christians are not to be snobs, there is a definite lifestyle that the Christian must live. (Ephesians 5:3-17) The Bible does teach a standard of acceptable conduct.

"revelling"-2970. komos {ko"-mos}; from 2749; a carousal (as if letting loose): -revelling, rioting. The same two Greek words rendered "revelling and drunkenness" also appear together in Galatians 5:21.

"Komos expresses a lustful excess in physical and sexual pleasure which is offensive to God and to man alike. It may well be that the best translation of it is that of J.W. C. Wand, when he translates it debauchery."

"Excessive feasting.." (Arndt p. 462) "Of feasts and drinking-parties that are protracted till late at night" (Thayer p. 367). Modern day "revellings" are found in many a (worldly) office, Christmas or New Year"s Eve party. 21st birthday parties and keggars.

"chambering"-"sexual promiscuity" (NASV), fornication, adultery, homosexuality.

"wantonness"-"sensuality" (NASV)

"strife and jealousy"-"quarreling and jealousy" (TCNT). We seem to erroneously think that being jealous isn"t as bad as getting drunk as a skunk. But God doesn"t buy it. The last two sins can do just as much damage as the other sins listed here.


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Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/romans-13.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

honestly = decently. Greek. euschemonos. Only here, 1 Corinthians 14:40. 1 Thessalonians 4:12.

rioting = revelling. Greek. komos. Only here, Galatians 1:5, Galatians 1:21. 1 Peter 4:3.

wantonness = lasciviousness. Here, Mark 7:22. 2 Corinthians 12:21. Galatians 1:5, Galatians 1:19. Ephesians 4:19. 1 Peter 4:3. 2 Peter 2:7, 2 Peter 2:18. Jude 1:4.

envying = jealousy. See Acts 5:17.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/romans-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying.

Let us walk honestly , [ euscheemonoos (Greek #2156)] - 'becomingly,' 'decorously,'

As in the day - q.d., 'Men choose the night for their revels, but our night is past, for we are all the children of the light and of the day (1 Thessalonians 5:5): let us therefore only do what is fit to be exposed to the light of such a day.'

Not in rioting and drunkenness - varied forms of intemperance; denoting revels in general, usually ending in intoxication;

Not in chambering and wantonness - varied forms of impurity; the one pointing to definite acts, the other more general; not in strife and envying-varied forms of that venomous feeling between man and man which reverses the law of love.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/romans-13.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

Let us conduct ourselves properly. Christians are "walking advertisements" for the Faith. Orgies. See note on Revelation 2:20. Immorality. The technical word is fornication. See notes on Matthew 19:9; Hebrews 13:4. Indecency. Sensuality, things that degrade human character. Fighting. See James 4:1-5. Jealousy. See Galatians 5:19-21; 1 Corinthians 3:3.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/romans-13.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) Honestly.—Decorously, becomingly, as men do when their actions are seen.

It is interesting to know that this verse, happening to catch the eye of St. Augustine, had a great effect in leading to his baptism and change of life.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/romans-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying.
us
Luke 1:6; Galatians 5:16,25; Ephesians 4:1,17; 5:2,8,15; Philippians 1:27; 3:16-20; 4:8,9; Colossians 1:10; 1 Thessalonians 2:12; 4:12; 1 Peter 2:12; 1 John 2:6; 2 John 1:4
honestly
or, decently. as.
Acts 2:15; 1 Thessalonians 5:17; 2 Peter 2:13
rioting
Proverbs 23:20; Isaiah 22:12,13; 28:7,8; Amos 6:4-6; Matthew 24:48-51; Luke 16:19; Luke 17:27,28; 21:34; 1 Corinthians 6:10; Galatians 5:21; Ephesians 5:18; 1 Peter 2:11; 4:3-5
chambering
1 Corinthians 6:9,10; Galatians 5:19; Ephesians 5:3-5; Colossians 3:5; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-5; 2 Peter 2:14,18-20; Jude 1:23
strife
Galatians 5:15,21,26; Philippians 2:3; James 3:14-16; 4:5; 1 Peter 2:1,2

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/romans-13.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

Let us walk honestly as in the day: not in rioting and darkenness; not in chambering and wantonness; not in strife and envying. This verse is an amplification of the preceding, stating some of those works of darkness which we are to put off; as Romans 13:14 states what is the armor of light which we are to put on. The word ( εὐσχημόνως) rendered honestly, means becomingly, properly. There are three classes of sins specified in this verse, to each of which two words are appropriated, viz., intemperance, impurity, and discord. Rioting and drunkenness belong to the first. The word ( κῶμος) appropriately rendered rioting, is used both in reference to the disorderly religious festivals kept in honor of Bacchus, and to the common boisterous carousing of intemperate young men, (see Passow, Vol. 1, p. 924.)‹72› The words chambering and wantonness, include all kinds of uncleanness; and strife and envying, all kinds of unholy emulation and discord.


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Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on Romans 13:13". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/romans-13.html.


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