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Bible Dictionaries

Charles Buck Theological Dictionary

Cynics

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A sect of ancient philosophers, who valued themselves upon their contempt of riches and state, arts and sciences, and every thing, in short, except virtue and morality. They owe their origin and institution to Antisthenes of Athens, a disciple of Socrates; who being asked of what use his philosophy had been to him, replied, "it enables me to live with myself." Diogenes was the most famous of his disciples, in whose life the system of this philosophy appears in its greatest perfection. He led a most whimsical life, despising every kind of convenience; a tub serving him for a lodging, which he rolled before him wherever he went: yet he was not the more humble on account of his ragged cloak, bag and tub. One day entering Plato's house, at a time when there was a splendid entertainment for several persons of distinction, he jumped, in all his dirt, upon a very rich couch, saying, "I trample on the pride of Plato!" "yes, " replied Plato, "but with still greater pride, Diogenes!" He had the utmost contempt for all the human race; for he walked the street of Athens at noon day, with a lighted lantern in his hand, telling the people "he was in search of an honest man." But with all his maxims of morality, he held some very pernicious opinions.

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Bibliography Information
Buck, Charles. Entry for 'Cynics'. Charles Buck Theological Dictionary. https://www.studylight.org/dictionaries/eng/cbd/c/cynics.html. 1802.

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