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Bible Lexicons

Old Testament Hebrew Lexical Dictionary

Welcome to the Hebrew Lexicon. This lexicon has been developed to aid the user in understanding the original text of the Hebrew Old Testament. By using the Strong's version of the King James and New American Standard Bibles, a deeper knowledge, of the passage being studied, can be gained.

To search this lexicon enter an English word, Hebrew word or Strong's Number in the text box under 'Search This Resource' and click 'Go.' Our script should understand your query and provide the proper results. In addition, links to entries in additional resources, matching your query, will be displayed. Clicking on the keyboard icon will open and close the Hebrew Keyboard.

But why study the Hebrew language?
The Old Testament was written 2,500 to 3,500 years ago by a people whose culture and lifestyle were very different from our own. When we read the Word of God as a modern day Christian, our culture and lifestyle often influence our interpretation of the words and phrases.

The word rain is a good example of how culture can influence ones view of a word. To a bride and groom preparing for an outdoor wedding the news of rain has a negative meaning, but to the farmer in the middle of a drought, the same word has a positive meaning. For many of us, rain means a spoiled picnic but to the ancient Hebrews, rain meant life, for without it their nomadic life would end. Without a cultural understanding of the words in the Bible, much is missed or overlooked.

Many times our modern culture can influence definitions of words in a way not intended by the original author. The Bible often refers to the keeping and breaking God's commands and covenant. To "keep" the commands of God is generally understood as to "obey" the commands, but this is not completely true since the Hebrew word "shamar" (שָׁמַר) literally means to guard or protect. The breaking of the commands is understood as "disobeying" but the Hebrew word "Parar" (פָּרַר) literally means to trample underfoot).


Lectionary Calendar
Friday, May 26th, 2017
the Sixth Week after Easter
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