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Bible Commentaries

Morgan's Exposition on the Whole Bible

1 Kings 15

Verses 1-34

In this chapter we have the continuation of a sad story in the kingdoms of Judah and Israel. Under the reign of Abijam the process of deterioration went rapidly forward. He walked in the sins of his father, thus abusing the position he occupied. The corruption was not universal, for God maintained a lamp in the midst of His people, that is to say, there was still a remnant loyal to the divine Covenant which partially checked the development of evil. There was a break in this downward process connected with the accession and long reign of Asa. We are told that his heart was perfect as was that of David, that is to say, that his purpose was good; and, indeed, during his reign certain reforms were carried out. These, however, were by no means complete, for the high places were not removed. Nevertheless, this partial reform under Asa preserved Judah for a time from the spread of the corruption and downfall which occurred in the case of Israel.

Returning to the history of the northern kingdom of Israel, we find a terrible story of corruption, in which the government of God is manifested proceeding in a series of judgments against the continued sin which characterized the reigns of successive kings. Nadab, the son of Jeroboam, reigned for two years, and his influence was wholly evil. He was slain by Baasha, who succeeded him. Baasha carried out the judgment of God on the house of Jeroboam in destroying all his sons, but, nevertheless, himself continued for four and twenty years in the same courses of evil.

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Bibliographical Information
Morgan, G. Campbell. "Commentary on 1 Kings 15". "Morgan's Exposition on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/gcm/1-kings-15.html. 1857-84.