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Bible Commentaries
2 Chronicles 18

Old & New Testament Restoration CommentaryRestoration Commentary

Introduction

Second Chronicles Chapter 18

2 Chronicles 18:1 "Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honour in abundance, and joined affinity with Ahab."

This was a terrible mistake on the part of Jehoshaphat. Those of God should never bind themselves together with the very worldly people. Ahab and his wife, Jezebel, were very evil. They could, possibly, be thought of as the most evil rule of the ten tribes of Israel. God had blessed Jehoshaphat so greatly that he was very rich. He had plenty of military men, himself, and they were well-equipped. He did not need Ahab. The very worst thing that Jehoshaphat had done was to allow Ahab and Jezebel’s daughter, Athaliah, to marry his son, Jehoram.

2 Chronicles 18:2 "And after [certain] years he went down to Ahab to Samaria. And Ahab killed sheep and oxen for him in abundance, and for the people that [he had] with him, and persuaded him to go up [with him] to Ramoth-gilead."

This is actually many years after the marriage of Jehoshaphat’s son and Ahab’s wicked daughter. This journey was believed to be in the 17th year of Jehoshaphat’s reign. Ahab had, probably, invited Jehoshaphat to come, so he could talk him into helping him. The animals slaughtered were for a great feast for Jehoshaphat. Ramoth-gilead was the place for the battle that Ahab had planned. This was a city in the land of Gad.

2 Chronicles 18:3 "And Ahab king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat king of Judah, Wilt thou go with me to Ramoth-gilead? And he answered him, I [am] as thou [art], and my people as thy people; and [we will be] with thee in the war."

They were in-laws, since their children had married. Jehoshaphat would like to help him in his trouble.

2 Chronicles 18:4 "And Jehoshaphat said unto the king of Israel, Inquire, I pray thee, at the word of the LORD to day."

Ahab was not a follower of the LORD. This request from Jehoshaphat was so that he would not be in a battle that would displease God. Since he was in the land of Ahab, it would have to be Ahab who would inquire of the LORD.

2 Chronicles 18:5 "Therefore the king of Israel gathered together of prophets four hundred men, and said unto them, Shall we go to Ramoth-gilead to battle, or shall I forbear? And they said, Go up; for God will deliver [it] into the king’s hand."

These 400 prophets were not of Baal or Ashteroth, but were the prophets that had been chosen to serve in the calf worship. They were not true prophets, however. They would say exactly what the king wanted to hear. They were not true prophets of God.

2 Chronicles 18:6 “But Jehoshaphat said, [Is there] not here a prophet of the LORD besides, that we might inquire of him? “

Jehoshaphat was not impressed with these prophets, who had not been ordained of God to be prophets. He wants to hear from a true prophet of God.

2 Chronicles 18:7 "And the king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat, [There is] yet one man, by whom we may inquire of the LORD: but I hate him; for he never prophesied good unto me, but always evil: the same [is] Micaiah the son of Imla. And Jehoshaphat said, Let not the king say so."

Ahab did not like the prophet, Micaiah, because he prophesied the truth about Ahab. Ahab did not want to hear the truth. He wanted the prophet to agree with him. He is the only true prophet among them all. There is little known about Micaiah, except what is here. He seemed to be a prophet, who had warned Ahab in the past. Jehoshaphat seems to be courteous to Ahab, here, but Ahab is aware that Jehoshaphat wants to hear the prophet, so he sends for him.

2 Chronicles 18:8 "And the king of Israel called for one [of his] officers, and said, Fetch quickly Micaiah the son of Imla."

He seems to be well-known. The officer knew where to find him. He went and brought the prophet to speak to Ahab and Jehoshaphat.

2 Chronicles 18:9 "And the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat king of Judah sat either of them on his throne, clothed in [their] robes, and they sat in a void place at the entering in of the gate of Samaria; and all the prophets prophesied before them."

The place, they were to accept the prophets, had to be a fairly large flat area for 401 prophets to be there. The robes meant that Jehoshaphat and Ahab were in their kingly robes. All of the prophets, who had a message, would be heard.

2 Chronicles 18:10 "And Zedekiah the son of Chenaanah had made him horns of iron, and said, Thus saith the LORD, With these thou shalt push Syria until they be consumed."

"Horns" symbolize strength, or power. These horns of iron would show great strength. Zedekiah was saying, that the power of Ahab was so great, he could not lose. Syria would be nothing more than a push-over for him.

2 Chronicles 18:11 "And all the prophets prophesied so, saying, Go up to Ramoth-gilead, and prosper: for the LORD shall deliver [it] into the hand of the king."

Of course, all of these false prophets would say the same thing, because that was what Ahab wanted to hear. They were prophesying to itching ears, not the truth.

2 Chronicles 18:12 "And the messenger that went to call Micaiah spake to him, saying, Behold, the words of the prophets [declare] good to the king with one assent; let thy word therefore, I pray thee, be like one of theirs, and speak thou good."

This messenger, that went to get Micaiah, did not want any trouble. He asked Micaiah to say the same thing the 400 false prophets had said. This would not be much of a prophet that would allow a messenger from this evil king tell him what to prophesy.

2 Chronicles 18:13 "And Micaiah said, [As] the LORD liveth, even what my God saith, that will I speak."

This is spoken like a true prophet. He is a messenger from God.

2 Chronicles 18:14 "And when he was come to the king, the king said unto him, Micaiah, shall we go to Ramoth-gilead to battle, or shall I forbear? And he said, Go ye up, and prosper, and they shall be delivered into your hand."

This was a true prophecy from God. They, probably, might win the battle. Not all would come back alive though. He did not tell a lie, he just did not tell all of the truth. This is really what he thought they wanted from him.

2 Chronicles 18:15 "And the king said to him, How many times shall I adjure thee that thou say nothing but the truth to me in the name of the LORD?"

King Ahab senses there was something wrong here. He usually prophesied against Ahab.

2 Chronicles 18:16 "Then he said, I did see all Israel scattered upon the mountains, as sheep that have no shepherd: and the LORD said, These have no master; let them return [therefore] every man to his house in peace."

Now, we get a few more of the details of the prophecy. Their leader, Ahab, would die. They would be sheep without a shepherd. The battle would be over, and all would go home in peace. The only difference was Ahab would die.

2 Chronicles 18:17 "And the king of Israel said to Jehoshaphat, Did I not tell thee [that] he would not prophesy good unto me, but evil?"

Ahab did not take this as a warning, but as an affront from this prophet of the LORD. He reminded Jehoshaphat, that he had said this prophet would speak evil of him.

2 Chronicles 18:18 "Again he said, Therefore hear the word of the LORD; I saw the LORD sitting upon his throne, and all the host of heaven standing on his right hand and [on] his left."

Micaiah had a vision of heaven and the throne of God. Notice, this prophet was telling Ahab that these words were from God. The "host of heaven", here, would be angels that were there to do the wishes of the LORD. "Angels" are ministering spirits.

2 Chronicles 18:19 "And the LORD said, Who shall entice Ahab king of Israel, that he may go up and fall at Ramoth-gilead? And one spake saying after this manner, and another saying after that manner."

These angel spirits around the throne were included in the actions of the LORD. It is interesting, that God would use these angel spirits. He could have just as easily caused Ahab to believe the lie without all of this. He had chosen to bring the lie to Ahab through these 400 false prophets, however. He would die at Ramoth-gilead, after they convinced him to go.

2 Chronicles 18:20 "Then there came out a spirit, and stood before the LORD, and said, I will entice him. And the LORD said unto him, Wherewith?"

2 Chronicles 18:21 "And he said, I will go out, and be a lying spirit in the mouth of all his prophets. And [the LORD] said, Thou shalt entice [him], and thou shalt also prevail: go out, and do [even] so."

This lying spirit would enter into the 400 false prophets, and they would prophesy a lie.

2 Chronicles 18:22 “Now therefore, behold, the LORD hath put a lying spirit in the mouth of these thy prophets, and the LORD hath spoken evil against thee."

Michaiah was telling Ahab the truth, but he prefered to listen to the lies of the false prophets, because they were telling him something he wanted to hear.

2 Chronicles 18:23 "Then Zedekiah the son of Chenaanah came near, and smote Micaiah upon the cheek, and said, Which way went the Spirit of the LORD from me to speak unto thee?"

We see that the slap of Micaiah by Zedekiah was a way of insulting him. Zedekiah was saying, you were not hearing from God. We do not have a lying spirit speaking through us.

2 Chronicles 18:24 "And Micaiah said, Behold, thou shalt see on that day when thou shalt go into an inner chamber to hide thyself."

Micaiah told Zedekiah that time would settle this. A prophecy that comes true is from God.

2 Chronicles 18:25 "Then the king of Israel said, Take ye Micaiah, and carry him back to Amon the governor of the city, and to Joash the king’s son;"

2 Chronicles 18:26 "And say, Thus saith the king, Put this [fellow] in the prison, and feed him with bread of affliction and with water of affliction, until I return in peace."

It appears, they had already had Micaiah locked up, because the king did not like his prophecies. This is, probably, speaking of the person in charge of the prison, not actually Ahab’s son. It would be highly unlikely the king’s son would be a jail-keeper.

2 Chronicles 18:27 "And Micaiah said, If thou certainly return in peace, [then] hath not the LORD spoken by me. And he said, Hearken, all ye people."

If Ahab returned alive, it would mean that Micaiah was not a true prophet. If Ahab died in the battle, Micaiah was the only true prophet, of Ahab’s prophets. Micaiah wanted all of the people to remember this.

2 Chronicles 18:28 "So the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat the king of Judah went up to Ramoth-gilead."

2 Chronicles 18:29 "And the king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat, I will disguise myself, and will go to the battle; but put thou on thy robes. So the king of Israel disguised himself; and they went to the battle."

Jehoshaphat, probably, believed Michaiah, but he realized the harm would not come to him individually. In a sense Ahab believed him too, because he disguised himself, thinking they would not kill him, if they thought him to be a commoner.

2 Chronicles 18:30 "Now the king of Syria had commanded the captains of the chariots that [were] with him, saying, Fight ye not with small or great, save only with the king of Israel."

The orders from the king of Syria to his men was that they were not to kill anyone, except king Ahab. He had no quarrel with the men, just Ahab.

2 Chronicles 18:31 "And it came to pass, when the captains of the chariots saw Jehoshaphat, that they said, It [is] the king of Israel. Therefore they compassed about him to fight: but Jehoshaphat cried out, and the LORD helped him; and God moved them [to depart] from him."

Jehoshaphat had on the kingly robes, and the men of Syria thought he was Ahab. The had encircled him to kill him, but he cried out that he was Jehoshaphat, and they believed him. God had actually opened their understanding that this truly was not Ahab.

2 Chronicles 18:32 "For it came to pass, that, when the captains of the chariots perceived that it was not the king of Israel, they turned back again from pursuing him." The men of Syria moved away from Jehoshaphat, when they realized he was not the king they were looking for.

2 Chronicles 18:33 "And a [certain] man drew a bow at a venture, and smote the king of Israel between the joints of the harness: therefore he said to his chariot man, Turn thine hand, that thou mayest carry me out of the host; for I am wounded."

The person who shot the arrow was not aiming at anything. He shot an arrow in the air at random, not expecting to hit anyone. God guided the arrow to the vital part of Ahab. He was shot in the area of his heart. This was the area covered by the breastplate. Ahab was not instantly killed, and requested his chariot man to turn the chariot around, and take him out of the heat of the battle.

2 Chronicles 18:34 "And the battle increased that day: howbeit the king of Israel stayed [himself] up in [his] chariot against the Syrians until the even: and about the time of the sun going down he died."

One thing we would have to say for Ahab, he was a brave man. He retired to the outer part of the battle, and fought all day even wounded as he was, before he died. His blood collected in the bottom of the chariot. His chariot was washed at the pool of Samaria and his blood was licked up of the dogs, as was prophesied.

2 Chronicles 18 Questions

1. What terrible thing did Jehoshaphat do in 2 Chronicles 18:1?

2. Who was Ahab’s evil wife?

3. What did Jehoshaphat do, that was even worse than joining affinity with Ahab?

4. When did Jehoshaphat go to see Ahab in Samaria?

5. What did Ahab do in his honor?

6. Ramoth-gilead was the place of the __________.

7. It was in the land of ______.

8. What did Ahab ask Jehoshaphat to do?

9. How did Jehoshaphat answer him?

10. Who did Jehoshaphat want to consult before going to battle?

11. How many prophets came to speak?

12. Who were these prophets?

13. What would these prophets say?

14. Was Jehoshaphat satisfied with the 400 prophets?

15. Why had Ahab not called Micaiah already?

16. Where did Ahab receive the prophets?

17. Who seemed to be the leader of the 400 prophets?

18. What had he made of iron?

19. "Horns" symbolize _________, or __________.

20. What message did the prophets give Ahab?

21. What did the messenger, that went for Micaiah, try to get him to say?

22. In 2 Chronicles 18:16, Micaiah saw what?

23. What did that mean?

24. What did Ahab do to Michaiah?

25. What are the "host of heaven" spoken of here?

26. What are "angels"?

27. Whose mouth will the lie come from?

28. What was meant by slapping Micaiah?

29. What will determine which prophecy is true?

30. What happens to Ahab?

Verses 1-3

2Ch 18:1-3

2 Chronicles 18:1-3

JEHOSHAPHAT’S UNHOLY ALLIANCE WITH THE WICKED AHAB;

JEHOSHAPHAT ACCEPTS AHAB’S INVITATION TO AID IN

THE WAR TO RECOVER RAMOTH-GILEAD FROM SYRIA

"Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honor in abundance; and he joined affinity with Ahab. And after certain years he went down to Ahab to Samaria. And Ahab killed sheep and oxen for him in abundance, and for the people that were with him, and moved him to go up with him to Ramoth-gilead. And Ahab king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat king of Judah, Wilt thou go with me to Ramoth-gilead? And he answered him, I am as thou art, and my people as thy people; and we will be with thee in the war."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 18:1. Joined affinity signifies that he formed an alliance with him. We ere not given any reason why Jehosha-phat made this move, and it was a strange one in view of the character of Ahab.

2 Chronicles 18:2-3. See the comments on a like passage in 1 Kings 22:3-4.

Verses 4-6

2Ch 18:4-6

2 Chronicles 18:4-6

THE FALSE PROPHETS OF AHAB FAIL TO CONVINCE JEHOSHAPHAT

"And Jehoshaphat said unto the king of Israel, Inquire first, I pray thee, for the word of Jehovah. Then the king of Israel gathered the prophets together, four hundred men, and said unto them, Shall we go to Ramoth-gilead to battle, or shall I forbear? And they said, Go up; for God will deliver IT into the hand of the king. But Jehoshaphat said, Is there not here a prophet of Jehovah besides, that we may inquire of him?"

Jehoshaphat’s asking here for a prophet of Jehovah dramatically states that the four hundred prophets of Ahab were not prophets of Jehovah. Ahab’s god was Baal; and his prophets were automatically prophets of Baal, not of Jehovah (1 Kings 22:53).

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 18:4. Jehoshaphat is classed among the good kings of Judah, although the project to which he agreed was ill-advised. However, he was unwilling to venture out on the important proposed action without some information, and the method of obtaining such in those days was through the prophets. (Hebrews 1:1.)

2 Chronicles 18:5. Prophets, like other teachers, sometimes give instructions they think will please their hearers regardless of whether they are correct.

2 Chronicles 18:6. Jehoshaphat knew of the disposition of men to be popular, and had some doubt with regard to these 400 prophets. He did not directly deny their being the prophets of the Lord. He merely asked if there were some other prophet besides them.

Verses 7-8

2Ch 18:7-8

2 Chronicles 18:7-8

AHAB RELUCTANTLY SENDS FOR MICAIAH

"And the king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat, There is yet one man by whom we may inquire of Jehovah; but I hate him; for he never prophesieth good concerning me, but always evil: the same is Micaiah the son of Imla. And Jehoshaphat said, Let not the king say so, Then the king of Israel called an officer, and said, Fetch quickly Micaiah the son of Imla."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 18:7. Ahab was naturally inclined to favor the 400 prophets because they favored him; by the same token he would not like the other prophet. When a man does not want to hear unpleasant truth, he dislikes the one who might give such to him. Ahab expressed himself along that line and was rebuked by Jehoshaphat.

2 Chronicles 18:8-9. Ahab had no way of evading the unpleasant situation, so he sent a servant to bring the prophet Micaiah before the two kings. As it was to be a meeting of a military nature, and one conducted jointly by the rulers of two great kingdoms, it was proper to provide a special place for this hearing. Accordingly, they selected a void or open plot of ground near the gate of Samaria, Ahab’s capital.

Verses 9-11

2Ch 18:9-11

2 Chronicles 18:9-11

THE FALSE PRIESTS PUT ON THEIR ACT

"Now the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat the king of Judah sat each on his throne, arrayed in their robes, and they were sitting in an open place at the entrance of the gate of Samaria; and all the prophts were prophesying before them. And Zedekiah the son of Chenaanah made him horns of iron and said, Thus saith Jehovah, With these shalt thou push the Syrians until they be consumed. And all the prophets prophesied so, saying, Go up to Ramoth-gilead, and prosper; for Jehovah will deliver it into the hand of the king."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 18:8-9. Ahab had no way of evading the unpleasant situation, so he sent a servant to bring the prophet Micaiah before the two kings. As it was to be a meeting of a military nature, and one conducted jointly by the rulers of two great kingdoms, it was proper to provide a special place for this hearing. Accordingly, they selected a void or open plot of ground near the gate of Samaria, Ahab’s capital.

2 Chronicles 18:10-11. While waiting for the prophet sent for to arrive, the 400 who were already present were not silent. One of them, Zedekiah by name, made a material gesture for emphasizing a prediction he wished to make. He had made some horns or pointed instruments of iron to use for effect in his speech. He made the prediction that Ahab would push or gore the Syrians until they would be consumed, which means completely defeated. All the others of the 400 Joined in with the flattery and urged the attack.

Verses 12-22

2Ch 18:12-22

2 Chronicles 18:12-22

MICAIAH PROPHESIES DEFEAT AND THE DEATH OF AHAB

"And the messenger that went to call Micaiah spake to him, saying, Behold, the words of the prophets declare good to the king with one mouth: let thy word therefore, I pray thee, be like one of theirs, and speak thou good. And Micaiah said, As Jehovah liveth, what my God saith, that will I speak. And when he was come to the king, the king said unto him, Micaiah, shall we go to Ramoth-gilead to battle, or shall I forbear. And he said, Go ye up, and prosper; and they shall be delivered into your hand.[3] And the king said unto him, How many times shall I adjure thee that thou speak unto me nothing but the truth in the name of Jehovah?[4] And he said, I saw all Israel scattered upon the mountains, as sheep that have no shepherd: and Jehovah said, These have no master; let them return every man to his house in peace. And the king of Israel said to Jehoshaphat, Did I not tell thee that he would not prophesy good concerning me, but evil? And Micaiah said, Therefore hear ye the word of Jehovah: I saw Jehovah sitting upon his throne, and all the host of heaven standing on his right hand and on his left. And Jehovah said, Who shall entice Ahab king of Israel, that he may go up and fall at Ramoth-gilead? And one spake, saying after this manner, and another saying after that manner. And there came forth a spirit, and stood before Jehovah, and said, I will entice him. And Jehovah said unto him, Wherewith? And he said, I will go forth, and I will be a lying spirit in the mouth of all his prophets. And he said, Thou shalt entice him, and shalt prevail also: go forth, and do so. Now therefore, behold, Jehovah hath put a lying spirit in the mouth of these thy prophets; and Jehovah hath spoken evil concerning thee."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 18:12. As the conversations recorded in the foregoing paragraph were going on, the messenger had arrived in the presence of Micaiah. He tried to prejudice him by reference to the 400 prophets who had spoken their minds already. The natural desire to be "on the side of the majority" was appealed to by the messenger, when he told Micaiah the purpose of his visit. He suggested that his word would be like that of the other prophets who had spoken favorably to the king.

2 Chronicles 18:13. This speech of Micaiah was similar in principle to the one made by Balsam to the messengers of Balak. (Numbers 22:18.)

2 Chronicles 18:14. Much of the meaning of a speech is indicated by the voice and facial expression of the speaker. We cannot see nor hear Micaiah as he makes this speech, but we are sure that it is made in irony. That is language used for a meaning directly opposite of the way it sounds.

2 Chronicles 18:15. The king was Ahab since he was the one who had sent for Micaiah. (2 Chronicles 18:8.) He detected the irony in the speech and chastised him for it. Ahab would welcome any favorable prediction, but he would want it to be given in seriousness. Adjure means to make an oath. He meant to charge Micaiah to tell the truth as if he were under oath.

2 Chronicles 18:16. Micaiah then spoke seriously and described a vision that the Lord had given him. In that he saw the defeat of the forces of Ahab.

2 Chronicles 18:17. In disgust and despair, the king of Israel broke into the scene with an "I-told-you-so" statement.

2 Chronicles 18:18. But Micaiah was not through with describing his vision. He had been permitted to witness a scene in the presence of the throne of God. The host of heaven would mean a numerous mass of celestial beings, ready to do the bidding of the Lord.

2 Chronicles 18:19-22. For explanation of this paragraph see my comments on 1 Kings 22:20-23.

Verses 23-27

2Ch 18:23-27

2 Chronicles 18:23-27

THE FALSE PROPHET SMITES MICAIAH

"Then Zedekiah the son of Chenaanah came near, and smote Micaiah upon the cheek, and said, Which way went the Spirit of Jehovah from me to speak unto thee? And Micaiah said, Behold, thou shalt see on that day, when thou shalt go to an inner chamber to hide thyself. And the king of Israel said, Take ye Micaiah, and carry him back unto Amon the governor of the city, and to Joash the king’s son; and say, Thus saith the king, Put this fellow in the prison, and feed him with bread of affliction and with water of affliction,[5] until I return in peace. And Micalab said, If thou return at all in peace, Jehovah hath not spoken by me. And he said, Hear, ye people, all of you!"

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 18:23. Again I ask the reader to see the comments on 1 Kings 22:24.

2 Chronicles 18:24. This is explained at 1 Kings 22:25.

2 Chronicles 18:25-26. Bread and water of affliction means the coarse fare often served to prisoners. This was a threat of humiliation to be imposed on Micaiah.

2 Chronicles 18:27. Micaiah staked his reputation as a true prophet on the outcome of the venture that Ahab was about to make. He called attention of the people to it, so that when the affair was ended they would remember what had been said.

Verses 28-34

2Ch 18:28-34

2 Chronicles 18:28-34

AHAB WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED AT RAMOTH-GILEAD

"So the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat the king of Judah went up to Ramoth-gilead. And the king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat, I will disguise myself, and go into the battle; but put thou on thy robes. So the king of Israel disguised himself; and they went into the battle. Now the king of Syria had commanded the captains of his chariots, saying, Fight neither with small nor great, save only with the king of Israel. And it came to pass, when the captains of the chariots saw Jehoshaphat, that they said, It is the king of Israel. Therefore they turned about to fight against him: but Jehoshaphat cried out, and Jehovah helped him; and God moved them to depart from him. And it came to pass, when the captains of the chariots saw that it was not the king of Israel, that they turned back from pursuing him. And a certain man drew his bow at a venture, and smote the king of Israel between the joints of the armor: wherefore he said to the driver of the chariot, Turn thy hand, and carry me out of the host; for I am sore wounded. And the battle increased that day: howbeit the king of Israel stayed himself up in his chariot against the Syrians until even; and about the time of the going down of the sun he died."

This entire chapter is parallel to 1 Kings 22, where you will find sufficient comments to explain this. It is not necessary to add anything here. The variations are unimportant.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 18:28-29. The two allies prepared to go up to battle. Let it be borne in mind that the king of Syria did not know he was to meet the king of Judah. Ahab was thinking of that, and planned to elude the Syrian weapons by not appearing in the attire of a king. Jehoshaphat would be the only one in such robes and hence would be the target for the foe. If this scheme could be carried out, Ahab hoped to frustrate the prediction of Micaiah and so be able to return in peace as he had boasted.

2 Chronicles 18:30. To take the king is about the same as taking the army. The Syrian king, thinking only of the king of Israel, gave the orders recorded here.

2 Chronicles 18:31. The charioteers were not personally acquainted with the Israelite kings. Seeing one man in royal robes, it was natural to conclude that he was the man wanted, and they were about to make their attack on Jehoshaphat who made an outcry. Ordinarily that would not have availed to ward off the attack. The verse says the Lord helped him which accounts for his escape as explained in the next verse.

2 Chronicles 18:32. This is the explanation of how the Lord helped Jehoshaphat; it was by revealing to the Syrians the fact that they were pursuing the wrong man.

2 Chronicles 18:33. This verse is the same account as given in 1 Kings 22:34. The reader is asked to see the comments at that place.

2 Chronicles 18:34. Ahab had requested his men to carry him out of the army. The request was not granted, but he was held up in his chariot by assistants through the day while the battle raged, and he died in the evening.

Bibliographical Information
"Commentary on 2 Chronicles 18". "Old & New Testament Restoration Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/onr/2-chronicles-18.html.
 
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