Lectionary Calendar
Friday, June 14th, 2024
the Week of Proper 5 / Ordinary 10
Attention!
StudyLight.org has pledged to help build churches in Uganda. Help us with that pledge and support pastors in the heart of Africa.
Click here to join the effort!

Bible Commentaries
2 Chronicles 25

Old & New Testament Restoration CommentaryRestoration Commentary

Introduction

Second Chronicles Chapter 25

2 Chronicles 25:1 "Amaziah [was] twenty and five years old [when] he began to reign, and he reigned twenty and nine years in Jerusalem. And his mother’s name [was] Jehoaddan of Jerusalem."

Joash must have been 22 years old, when Amaziah was born. Jehoaddan, was chosen by Jehoiada to be the wife of Joash. Since Jehoiada was a Godly influence on Joash during his life, we know he must have chosen a Godly wife for Joash. Possibly, the reason that Amaziah was a believer in the LORD was, because of the training he got in the home from his mother.

2 Chronicles 25:2 "And he did [that which was] right in the sight of the LORD, but not with a perfect heart."

It appears, that Amaziah started out as a king seeking God’s own heart, but strayed in the latter part of his reign, as his father did.

2 Chronicles 25:3 "Now it came to pass, when the kingdom was established to him, that he slew his servants that had killed the king his father."

We remember, from the previous lesson, that Joash was sick and in his own bed, when the servants came and killed him. Amaziah sought the servants out who killed his father and killed them.

2 Chronicles 25:4 "But he slew not their children, but [did] as [it is] written in the law in the book of Moses, where the LORD commanded, saying, The fathers shall not die for the children, neither shall the children die for the fathers, but every man shall die for his own sin."

We see, from this, that Amaziah knew the law, and observed it in this instance. He seemed to want to please God in the judgments he made.

2 Chronicles 25:5 "Moreover Amaziah gathered Judah together, and made them captains over thousands, and captains over hundreds, according to the houses of [their] fathers, throughout all Judah and Benjamin: and he numbered them from twenty years old and above, and found them three hundred thousand choice [men, able] to go forth to war, that could handle spear and shield."

The army had been greatly scattered after the attack by the Syrians. This is a re-grouping of the army. 300,000 men would be a fairly large army for such a small land.

2 Chronicles 25:6 "He hired also an hundred thousand mighty men of valour out of Israel for an hundred talents of silver."

A talent weighed 125 pounds, or 1,500 ounces. 100 talents would be 150,000 ounces of silver. This means he paid 1.5 ounces of silver for each man to fight.

2 Chronicles 25:7 "But there came a man of God to him, saying, O king, let not the army of Israel go with thee; for the LORD [is] not with Israel, [to wit, with] all the children of Ephraim."

We saw in the last lesson, that God continued to send warnings to Judah by the prophets. The man of God, here, is a prophet sent to warn them.

2 Chronicles 25:8 "But if thou wilt go, do [it], be strong for the battle: God shall make thee fall before the enemy: for God hath power to help, and to cast down."

This is the message that the prophet gave to Amaziah. It would be up to Amaziah to heed this warning. So many times, a man of great worldly power will not change a decision he has made, for fear of looking foolish to his people. If Amaziah heeded this message from God under this great pressure, it would indicate that he was seeking to do God’s will.

2 Chronicles 25:9 "And Amaziah said to the man of God, But what shall we do for the hundred talents which I have given to the army of Israel? And the man of God answered, The LORD is able to give thee much more than this."

He had already paid Israel the silver to help him. Now, he would lose his silver, if he sent them home. That little amount of silver is nothing to the LORD who owns everything. If he would step out in faith and do the will of the LORD, he would receive many times that amount of silver from the LORD. This would take a great deal of faith that this message was from God.

2 Chronicles 25:10 "Then Amaziah separated them, [to wit], the army that was come to him out of Ephraim, to go home again: wherefore their anger was greatly kindled against Judah, and they returned home in great anger."

The Israelites, specifically from Ephraim, did not want to be sent home. They, possibly, thought they would get some of the spoil of the battle, if they stayed. It, also, was an affront to them that they were no longer needed in this battle.

2 Chronicles 25:11 "And Amaziah strengthened himself, and led forth his people, and went to the valley of salt, and smote of the children of Seir ten thousand."

2 Chronicles 25:12 "And [other] ten thousand [left] alive did the children of Judah carry away captive, and brought them unto the top of the rock, and cast them down from the top of the rock, that they all were broken in pieces."

The top of the rock, here, is speaking of Petra. Even after Amaziah sent the troops of Ephraim home, he still depended upon his own strength, instead of the strength of God. He went to battle near the Dead Sea. The ten thousand he smote at the sea, were in addition to those he threw off of the rock and killed.

2 Chronicles 25:13 "But the soldiers of the army which Amaziah sent back, that they should not go with him to battle, fell upon the cities of Judah, from Samaria even unto Beth-horon, and smote three thousand of them, and took much spoil."

Those of Ephraim, that Amaziah had sent home, took advantage of Amaziah’s troops being gone to war, and attacked the villages of Judah. It appears, they killed 3,000 of Judah’s people.

2 Chronicles 25:14 "Now it came to pass, after that Amaziah was come from the slaughter of the Edomites, that he brought the gods of the children of Seir, and set them up [to be] his gods, and bowed down himself before them, and burned incense unto them."

This was a terrible thing to do. It appears, that the faith Amaziah had in God was short lived. He could not have had deep convictions, or else, he would not have brought these false gods home from Edom with him.

2 Chronicles 25:15 "Wherefore the anger of the LORD was kindled against Amaziah, and he sent unto him a prophet, which said unto him, Why hast thou sought after the gods of the people, which could not deliver their own people out of thine hand?"

This was a very good question. If those false gods had any power, they would have saved the people who worshipped them.

2 Chronicles 25:16 "And it came to pass, as he talked with him, that [the king] said unto him, Art thou made of the king’s counsel? forbear; why shouldest thou be smitten? Then the prophet forbare, and said, I know that God hath determined to destroy thee, because thou hast done this, and hast not hearkened unto my counsel."

Amaziah warned the prophet to stop speaking, if he wanted to live. The prophet had already spoken what the LORD had sent him to say, and there was nothing more to say, so he did stop. He did not stop because Amaziah threatened him, but because he had already given the message God had given him. He told Amaziah that God would destroy him for bringing the false gods back and worshipping them.

2 Chronicles 25:17 "Then Amaziah king of Judah took advice, and sent to Joash, the son of Jehoahaz, the son of Jehu, king of Israel, saying, Come, let us see one another in the face."

Amaziah was so proud of himself for his victory over Seir, that he now thought he could win over Israel. This was a challenge to Joash of Israel to come to battle with him.

2 Chronicles 25:18 "And Joash king of Israel sent to Amaziah king of Judah, saying, The thistle that [was] in Lebanon sent to the cedar that [was] in Lebanon, saying, Give thy daughter to my son to wife: and there passed by a wild beast that [was] in Lebanon, and trode down the thistle."

2 Chronicles 25:19 "Thou sayest, Lo, thou hast smitten the Edomites; and thine heart lifteth thee up to boast: abide now at home; why shouldest thou meddle to [thine] hurt, that thou shouldest fall, [even] thou, and Judah with thee?"

We see that Joash of Israel had no love for Amaziah. He told Amaziah that just because he had won a battle with Edom, did not mean that he could fight against Israel. He was speaking of Judah as the thistle and Israel as the cedar. He warned Amaziah not to go to battle with Israel. Amaziah and Judah would be severely hurt in a battle of this nature.

2 Chronicles 25:20 "But Amaziah would not hear; for it [came] of God, that he might deliver them into the hand [of their enemies], because they sought after the gods of Edom."

God put it in the heart of Amaziah to go against Israel, so that He could punish him for bringing back the false gods of Edom and worshipping them. God was jealous. He would not allow the worship of false gods.

2 Chronicles 25:21 "So Joash the king of Israel went up; and they saw one another in the face, [both] he and Amaziah king of Judah, at Bethshemesh, which [belongeth] to Judah."

2 Chronicles 25:22 "And Judah was put to the worse before Israel, and they fled every man to his tent."

It is interesting, to me, that this battle took place in Judah. It appears, that Israel might have been the aggressor here. God punished Judah by Israel winning the battle. The soldiers of Judah ran home to their own tents.

2 Chronicles 25:23 "And Joash the king of Israel took Amaziah king of Judah, the son of Joash, the son of Jehoahaz, at Beth-shemesh, and brought him to Jerusalem, and brake down the wall of Jerusalem from the gate of Ephraim to the corner gate, four hundred cubits."

It was as if Joash wanted Amaziah to see the destruction of Jerusalem. He tore down 600 feet of the wall in front of Amaziah.

2 Chronicles 25:24 "And [he took] all the gold and the silver, and all the vessels that were found in the house of God with Obed-edom, and the treasures of the king’s house, the hostages also, and returned to Samaria."

The person, who was in charge of the treasures in the temple at this time, seemed to be Obed-edom. Joash of Israel robbed the temple. He did not keep Jerusalem. He just took the people, who had been captives there, and all of the wealth of the land.

2 Chronicles 25:25 "And Amaziah the son of Joash king of Judah lived after the death of Joash son of Jehoahaz king of Israel fifteen years."

It appears, that Amaziah of Judah out-lived Joash of Israel by fifteen years.

2 Chronicles 25:26 "Now the rest of the acts of Amaziah, first and last, behold, [are] they not written in the book of the kings of Judah and Israel?" Again, we see that more details on the reign of King Amaziah are found in the book of Kings in the Bible.

2 Chronicles 25:27 "Now after the time that Amaziah did turn away from following the LORD they made a conspiracy against him in Jerusalem; and he fled to Lachish: but they sent to Lachish after him, and slew him there."

This was speaking of Amaziah’s own people turning against him, and killing him. It appears, the conspiracy had been growing in strength, since he came back from his battle, when he brought the idols from Edom. He did not feel safe in Jerusalem, and ran to Lachish where he was killed.

2 Chronicles 25:28 "And they brought him upon horses, and buried him with his fathers in the city of Judah."

He had an honorable burial in Jerusalem. The people who killed him, brought him back to Jerusalem on his horses that he had fled on.

2 Chronicles 25 Questions

1. How old was Amaziah, when he began to reign?

2. How long did he reign?

3. How old was Joash, when his son, Amaziah, was born?

4. Who had chosen the wives of Joash of Judah?

5. Amaziah did that which was _________in the sight of the LORD.

6. Who did Amaziah kill, as soon as he was established in his kingdom?

7. Why did he not kill their families?

8. How many men of war in Judah and Jerusalem did he bring together?

9. Who did he hire to help his troops?

10. How much does a talent of silver weigh?

11. What message did the man of God bring him?

12. What does 2 Chronicles 25:8 say, God has the power to do?

13. What question did Amaziah ask the prophet of God?

14. What was the answer he gave?

15. How did the Israelites, who had been hired, feel about being sent home?

16. Who strengthened Amaziah?

17. The top of the rock, in 2 Chronicles 25:12, is speaking of _________.

18. How many did Amaziah smite at the Dead Sea?

19. The soldiers that Amaziah sent back, did what, instead of going home?

20. What terrible thing did Amaziah do, when he came from the slaughter of the Edomites?

21. What message did God send Amaziah by a prophet?

22. Why did Amaziah want to go to war again?

23. Who does he challenge to a war?

24. What did Joash of Israel tell him he should do?

25. Where did the two kings meet in battle?

26. Who won?

27. What did the king of Israel take from Jerusalem?

28. Who had been in charge of the temple treasures?

29. How long did Amaziah live, after Joash of Israel?

30. How, and where, was Amaziah killed?

Verses 1-4

2Ch 25:1-4

Introduction

THE TRAGIC RECORD OF AMAZIAH’S REIGN IN JUDAH

AMAZIAH (800-783 B.C.)

We have already written about a dozen pages in 2 Kings 14 regarding the reign of Amaziah, taking due note of the additional information provided in this chapter. We shall do little here except print the chapter.

2 Chronicles 25:1-4

AMAZIAH SLAYS THE MURDERERS OF HIS FATHER

"Amaziah was twenty and five years old when he began to reign; and he reigned twenty and nine years in Jerusalem. And he did that which was right in the eyes of Jehovah, but not with a perfect heart. And it came to pass when the kingdom was established unto him, that he slew his servants who had killed the king his father. But he put not their children to death, according to that which is written in the law in the book of Moses, as Jehovah commanded, saying, The fathers shall not die for the children, neither shall the children die for the fathers; but every man shall die for his own sin."

"He did that which was right in the eyes of Jehovah" (2 Chronicles 25:2). The qualifying clause, "not with a perfect heart" is in effect an admission that his reign was evil. His doing right in God’s sight apparently applies only to his sparing the children of his servants whom he executed for the death of his father.

The commandment of God through Moses, mentioned in 2 Chronicles 25:4, is found in Deuteronomy 24:16. (See our comments in the Commentary on 2 Kings 14 for the very great significance of this reference.)

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 25:1. The place where Amaziah reigned is given because the kingdom of the 10 tribes had other cities for its capitals. Jerusalem was the original headquarters of God’s people, and Judah was favored in that it retained possession of that city. The mother’s name was given because the kings had plurality of wives and the writer wished us to know which was the mother of the man being considered.

2 Chronicles 25:2. Due credit was given always to the actions of men, but their failings also were noted. The shortcomings of Amaziah will show up partly in the history.

2 Chronicles 25:3-4. Amaziah would have reigned after his father, although he had been permitted to live out his natural lifetime. The fact of his receiving the throne much earlier than was to have been expected, did not blind him to the great guilt of his father’s assassins. Therefore, as soon as his possession of the throne was made certain, he executed those conspirators.

Verses 5-13

2Ch 25:5-13

2 Chronicles 25:5-13

AMAZIAH’S SINFUL PREPARATIONS FOR WAR AGAINST EDOM

"Moreover Amaziah gathered Judah together, and ordered them according to their fathers’ houses, under captains of thousands and captains of hundreds, even all Judah and Benjamin: and he numbered them from twenty years old and upward, and found them three hundred thousand chosen men, able to go forth to war, that could handle spear and shield. He hired also a hundred thousand mighty men of valor out of Israel for a hundred talents of silver. But there came a man of God to him, saying, O king, let not the army of Israel go with thee; for Jehovah is not with Israel, to wit, with all the children of Ephraim. But if thou wilt go, do valiantly, be strong for the battle: God will cast thee down before the enemy; for God hath power to help, and to cast down. And Amaziah said to the man of God, But what shall we do for the hundred talents which I have given to the army of Israel? And the man of God answered, Jehovah is able to give thee much more than this. Then Amaziah separated them, to wit, the army that was come to him out of Ephraim to go home again: wherefore their anger was greatly kindled against Judah, and they returned home in fierce anger. And Amaziah took courage, and led forth his people, and went to the Valley of Salt, and smote of the children of Seir ten thousand. And other ten thousand did the children of Judah carry away alive, and brought them unto the top of the rock, and cast them down from the top of the rock, so that they were all broken in pieces. But the men of the army whom Amaziah sent back, that they should not go with him to battle, fell upon the cities of Judah, from Samaria even unto Beth-horon, and smote of them three thousand, and took much spoil."

"Jehovah is not with Israel, to wit, the children of Ephraim" (2 Chronicles 25:7). The man of God here made it plain that the rebellion of the northern tribes against the Davidic dynasty had forfeited their further identity as "God’s Chosen People." This is the reason that the Chronicler completely ignored, in as much as it was possible, the entire Northern Israel, focusing his attention completely upon the fortunes of Judah.

"The top of the rock" (2 Chronicles 25:12). "This was the height of Petra, the Edomite capital, near where the battle was fought."

Other Scriptures which relate the horrible cruelties of the Edomite wars with Israel are 1 Kings 11:15; Ezekiel 25:12; and Obadiah 1:14. The Edomites were descendants of Esau, Jacob’s twin brother; and there is no more terrible an example of brother hating brother in human history.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 25:5. Warfare was the "order of the day" in those years, and it was important that the king be prepared. Judah and Benjamin are both mentioned because both tribes were included in the kingdom, although Judah gave the name to it, being the larger tribe.

2 Chronicles 25:6. It was not an unusual thing for a king or other military leader to hire soldiers into his service. Such men are called mercenaries, and the arrangement is not considered necessarily objectionable. However, there was a special reason why it was an unfavorable movement in the case of Amaziah.

2 Chronicles 25:7. A man of God means some man sent from God for a special reason; to deliver to Amaziah a protest against his hiring men out of the kingdom of Israel (the 10 tribes). God was not favorably disposed toward that kingdom and would not prosper any work attempted in connection with it. Ephraim is a term that came to be used, both in history and the writings of the prophets, to refer to the 10 tribes. It is well worded in Smith’s Bible Dictionary thus: "After the revolt of Jeroboam the history of Ephraim is the history of the kingdom of Israel, since not only did the tribe become a kingdom, but the kingdom embraced little besides the tribe."

2 Chronicles 25:8. Amaziah was further warned that if he insisted on using these hired men of Israel he would fail in the battle. An additional reason was given for not using the legions of mercenaries in the words, God bath power to help, and to cast down. If a battle is not favored, all the multitudes in the world would not give a man success. This is taught also by Paul in Romans 8:31.

2 Chronicles 25:9. Amaziah was convinced that he should not use the hired soldiers. But he was worried about the money he had paid them in advance and which he could not get back from them. The man of God assured him that the Lord would more than repay him for his financial loss.

2 Chronicles 25:10. Amaziah dismissed the men he had hired out of Ephraim (the 10 tribes), and told them to go home. We would take that as a special favor, to have all that money and yet not have to fight. The account says they were angry over it. The explanation is that it was a shock to their military pride. They felt that it was the same as if Amaziah had said to them, "I can get along in my battle just as well without your services as with them, so you may go home." They will show their resentment by their actions before the affair is over.

2 Chronicles 25:11. Valley of salt was a region not far from the Dead Sea, otherwise called the Salt Sea. Children of Seir means the Edomites because Mount Seir was a central point in the territory occupied by that people.

2 Chronicles 25:12. War is a terrible procedure, and includes various methods of destruction. The Edomites who could not be captured alive were slain in battle. There were 10,000 who were taken alive and were to be destroyed in a mass. It was accomplished by thrusting them down a rocky precipice.

2 Chronicles 25:13. This verse records the revenge that was intimated at 2 Chronicles 25:10. The men whom Amaziah hired and then dismissed, "took their spite out" on him by attacking some of his cities and killing many of the inhabitants.

Verses 14-16

2Ch 25:14-16

2 Chronicles 25:14-16

AMAZIAH’S SINFUL WORSHIP OF EDOMITE GODS

"Now it came to pass, after Amaziah was come from the slaughter of the Edomites, that he brought the gods of the children of Seir, and bowed down himself before them, and burned incense unto them. Wherefore the anger of Jehovah was kindled against Amaziah, and he sent unto him a prophet, who said unto him, Why hast thou sought after the gods of the people, which have not delivered their own people out of thy hand? And it came to pass as he talked with him, that the king said unto him, Have we made thee of the king’s counsel? forbear; why shouldest thou be smitten? Then the prophet forbare, and said, I know that God hath determined to destroy thee, because thou hast done this, and hast not hearkened unto my counsel."

Ellison noted that, "Amaziah held the debased view that Jehovah was the supreme God, but yet was only one god among many gods." His purpose in carrying away the gods of Edom (of whom we know nothing) was perhaps that of depriving the Edomites of any support they might have been supposed to give Edom. Amaziah’s worshipping them and burning incense to them was a cardinal violation of the Law of Moses and the Decalogue, "Thou shalt not bow down thyself unto them (images)" (Exodus 20:5).

Amaziah’s victory over Edom had apparently completely turned his head. His subsequent behavior was that of a fool.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 25:14. The conduct of Amaziah in this case is difficult if not impossible to explain. It does not have the small token that Ahaz had on a similar occasion (Ch. 28:23) which will be considered at the proper time. There is nothing present over other instances of idolatry. What we know is that mankind has always been inclined to worship a god that can be seen and touched.

2 Chronicles 25:15. God sent a prophet to speak to Amaziah. (Hebrews 1:1.) The reasoning of the prophet was very logical. If Amaziah was able to defeat the Edomites in spite of their gods, why would he worship them as if they were being stronger than he?

2 Chronicles 25:16. Art thou made of the king’s counsel was another way of telling the prophet that he had not been asked for any of his advice. The king further threatened to use violence against the prophet. He did not offer any more advice, but made a prediction that God would overthrow him for rejecting the counsel of a prophet.

Verses 17-19

2Ch 25:17-19

2 Chronicles 25:17-19

AMAZIAH DECIDES TO DECLARE WAR AGAINST NORTHERN ISRAEL

"Then Amaziah king of Judah took advice, and sent to Joash, the son of Jehoahaz, king of Israel, saying, Come, let us look one another in the face. And Joash king of Israel sent to Amaziah king of Judah, saying, The thistle that was in Lebanon sent to the cedar that was in Lebanon, saying, Give thy daughter to my son to wife; and there passed by a wild beast that was in Lebanon, and trod down the thistle. Thou sayest, Lo, thou hast smitten Edom; and thy heart lifteth thee up to boast: abide now at home; why shouldest thou meddle to thy hurt, that thou shouldest fall, even thou, and Judah with thee?"

"And Amaziah ... took advice" (2 Chronicles 25:17). Moffatt renders this, "Let himself be counseled." The previous paragraph reveals that Amaziah rejected the Word of God’s prophet; and therefore the counsel which he received here was not of God but of Satan.

"Let us look one another in the face" (2 Chronicles 25:17). This was both intended and understood to be a declaration of war. Joash properly understood the arrogant and egotistical intentions of Amaziah and warned him of the fate that would overtake him; but Amaziah would not hearken to any sound advice.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 25:17. Took advice. The first word is not in the original as a sepa rate term. The second is from YAATS and Strong defines it, "a primitive root; to advise; reflexively, to deliberate or resolve." Among the words by which it has been rendered in the A. V. are determine, devise, purpose. That makes the matter clear. Amaziah felt above taking any advice from another, but made up his own mind, urged on by the success of his encounter with the Edomites. With that fact to puff him up in pride, he resolved to make another try at battle to win more glory. See one another in. the face when said by one military man to another was the same as challenging him to close contact in battle.

2 Chronicles 25:18. The king of Israel (the 10 tribes) understood what was prompting Amaziah’s challenge, and tried to get him to drop the case, by telling him a fable. In order to appreciate the force of it we must understand that the cedars of Lebanon were always considered among the loftiest and most elegant of trees. A thistle would be about as much of a contrast as one could imagine. Next, transfer the thought to people whose social ranks were as different from each other as were the artistic qualities of the cedar and the thistle. To ask a cedar for his daughter in marriage to the son of the thistle would be the height of insult. Even the beasts of the field would be shocked at the impudence of such a proposal upon hearing it, and put an end to the affair by trampling down the thistle. This fable was a figurative hint to Amaziah of the fate that would come to him for his inappropriate challenge.

2 Chronicles 25:19. The king of Israel then spoke seriously and correctly. He explained to him that his success over the Edomites had puffed him up, and advised him to stay at home.

Verses 20-24

2Ch 25:20-24

2 Chronicles 25:20-24

AMAZIAH DEFEATED; CAPTURED; AND JERUSALEM PLUNDERED

"But Amaziah would not hear; for it was of God, that he might deliver them into the hand of their enemies, because they had sought after the gods of Edom. So Joash king of Israel went up; and he and Amaziah king of Judah looked one another in the face at Beth-shemesh, which belongeth to Judah. And Judah was put to the worse before Israel; and they fled every man to his tent. And Joash king of Israel took Amaziah king of Judah, the son of Joash, the son of Jehoahaz, at Beth-shemesh, and brought him to Jerusalem, and brake down the wall of Jerusalem from the gate of Ephraim to the corner gate, four hundred cubits. And he took all the gold and silver, and all the vessels that were found in the house of God with Obed-edom, and the treasures of the king’s house, and the hostages also, and returned to Samaria."

See our discussion in the parallel account in Kings. This was a catastrophic defeat and humiliation for the arrogant Amaziah. He was left on the throne, purely by the contemptuous mercy and forbearance of the king of Israel, who might indeed have killed him.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 25:20. God never forces a good man to become a bad one, nor leads him against his will to do the wrong thing. But if he chooses to commit a grievious iniquity that deserves some appropriate and special punishment, then he often does direct him into the channel that will bring upon him the needed penalty. This is the explanation of the verse, in which we have the sin noted for which the punishment was brought, because they sought after the gods of Edom.

2 Chronicles 25:21. The expression used in 2 Chronicles 25:17 is repeated here, meaning that they came into close contact in battle. The spot of the encounter was Judah’s territory.

Verse 22. Put to the worse denotes that the battle went against the army of Amaziah. The actual number of casualties is not stated, but the defeat was so severe that the men of Judah fled from the field of battle and sought shelter in their camp.

2 Chronicles 25:23. The king of Judah was permitted to live, but was captured and taken to his capital, Jerusalem, where he was released. But Joash had been admitted into the city with its king in custoday, after he had destroyed part of the wall.

2 Chronicles 25:24. Joash took advantage of his presence inside the city of Jerusalem to plunder it and take its treasures as booty of war. While at it, he also plundered the palace of its valuables. Hostages is from two Hebrew words that mean, when combined, the holding of persons regarded with high esteem as an assurance against future disturbance. Amaziah had intruded into the rights of Joash, without provocation and against good advice, and he might do so again. Hence these persons were taken along with Joash as he returned to his capital at Samaria. Obed-edom was the man who had given refuge for the ark when it was being transported toward Jerusalem. (1 Chronicles 13:14.) That good man would be highly esteemed by the people of Judah, and they would be careful about his safety. Because of these facts he was taken in hand by Joash, along with other hostages, when he left for his own kingdom.

Verses 25-28

2Ch 25:25-28

2 Chronicles 25:25-28

CONSPIRACY AGAINST AMAZIAH; AND HIS MURDER

"And Amaziah the son of Joash king of Judah lived after the death of Joash son of Jehoahaz king of Israel fifteen years. Now the rest of the acts of Amaziah, first and last, behold, are they not written in the book of the kings of Judah and Israel? Now from the time that Amaziah did turn away from following Jehovah they made a conspiracy against him in Jerusalem; and he fled to Lachish; but they sent after him to Lachish, and slew him there. And they brought him upon horses, and buried him with his fathers in the city of Judah."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 25:25-26. These verses are not in chronological order, but are a general statement of the life of Amaziah. See the comments at 1 Kings 14:19 in connection with references to outside books as further reading matter.

2 Chronicles 25:27. Going back into the history of Amaziah, the writer picks up the circumstances of his violent death. Conspiracy is always regarded unfavorably, as being an unlawful way of accomplishing a result. However, it is the inspired writer who connects this conspiracy with the fact of Amaziah’s having turned away from following the Lord. That would give the conspiracy a show of having a good motive at least. When the king recognized his danger he fled to Lachish, an important city not far from Jerusalem. The conspirators followed him to that city and slew him there. He was brought back to Jerusalem for burial. The city of Judah is a general term referring to Zion in Jerusalem, according to 2 Kings 14:20. He was brought upon horses, which indicates that the conspirators regarded their action as being justified under the rules of war. According to Smith’s Bible Dictionary the horse was used exclusively for warlike purposes. We may be confused about why Solomon was said to have been so much interested in horses, when he was a man of "peace" and never had a war. But his connection with them was commercial. See 1 Kings 10:28-29.

Bibliographical Information
"Commentary on 2 Chronicles 25". "Old & New Testament Restoration Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/onr/2-chronicles-25.html.
 
adsfree-icon
Ads FreeProfile