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Bible Commentaries
2 Chronicles 33

Old & New Testament Restoration CommentaryRestoration Commentary

Introduction

Second Chronicles Chapter 33

2 Chronicles 33:1 "Manasseh [was] twelve years old when he began to reign, and he reigned fifty and five years in Jerusalem:"

We saw in the last chapter, that Hezekiah, one of the kings who tried to please God, was the father of this very evil king. Manasseh was very young, when he took over as king. He reigned, until he was 67 years old.

2 Chronicles 33:2 "But did [that which was] evil in the sight of the LORD, like unto the abominations of the heathen, whom the LORD had cast out before the children of Israel."

To say that Manasseh was evil was an understatement of the facts. Historical books say that Isaiah was sawn assunder by the orders of this evil king. He chose the heathen false gods over the One True God.

2 Chronicles 33:3 "For he built again the high places which Hezekiah his father had broken down, and he reared up altars for Baalim, and made groves, and worshipped all the host of heaven, and served them."

It seemed, that all of the good his father Hezekiah had done, he turned around into something very evil. He restored the evil worship of Ashteroth and Baalim. He worshipped the sun, moon, and stars, instead of worshipping the One who created them. He was worshipping things he could see with his physical eyes. I have said before, anything that you can see with physical eyes is not God. God is a Spirit.

2 Chronicles 33:4 "Also he built altars in the house of the LORD, whereof the LORD had said, In Jerusalem shall my name be for ever."

2 Chronicles 33:5 "And he built altars for all the host of heaven in the two courts of the house of the LORD."

This is even worse than building the high places. Now, they had brought these evil false gods into the temple in Jerusalem, which had been built as a place of fellowship with the True God. The host of heaven indicates they were observers of the times of the horoscope.

2 Chronicles 33:6 "And he caused his children to pass through the fire in the valley of the son of Hinnom: also he observed times, and used enchantments, and used witchcraft, and dealt with a familiar spirit, and with wizards: he wrought much evil in the sight of the LORD, to provoke him to anger."

This is speaking of sacrificing children to the false god, Molech. All of the things mentioned in the verses above, were strictly forbidden of God. They were things the Ammonites and the Moabites had been doing. Judah, under the rule of Manasseh, began to practice the evils of the heathens. Observers of times is speaking of the horoscope signs. This particular sin is still prevalent in our society today. Palm reading, hypnotism, tarot cards, and many other things are directly associated with these things. All of the things, mentioned in the Scripture above, are forbidden in the Levitical law.

2 Chronicles 33:7 "And he set a carved image, the idol which he had made, in the house of God, of which God had said to David and to Solomon his son, In this house, and in Jerusalem, which I have chosen before all the tribes of Israel, will I put my name for ever:"

This carved image of a false god had come into the temple, which God had accepted from His people as His earthly abode. God had accepted it at the dedication ceremony, when Solomon prayed before the altar. This is the very worst thing they could have done. God will not let this continue.

2 Chronicles 33:8 "Neither will I any more remove the foot of Israel from out of the land which I have appointed for your fathers; so that they will take heed to do all that I have commanded them, according to the whole law and the statutes and the ordinances by the hand of Moses."

The blessings, that God had promised His people, had been conditional from the beginning. He would bless them, as long as they obeyed him and kept His commandments. When they did not, there would be abundant curses fall upon them.

2 Chronicles 33:9 "So Manasseh made Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem to err, [and] to do worse than the heathen, whom the LORD had destroyed before the children of Israel."

Manasseh was so evil, himself, that he caused the people to sin with him. God had destroyed the heathen for doing even less evil than this. An evil ruler causes his subjects to be evil, as well.

2 Chronicles 33:10 "And the LORD spake to Manasseh, and to his people: but they would not hearken."

God loved them, even though they had done these terrible things. They did not take the warning he sent, however. They were so proud, they would not humble themselves before God.

2 Chronicles 33:11 "Wherefore the LORD brought upon them the captains of the host of the king of Assyria, which took Manasseh among the thorns, and bound him with fetters, and carried him to Babylon."

This is very plain that the captains of the Assyrians took him and turned him over to the Babylonians.

2 Chronicles 33:12 "And when he was in affliction, he besought the LORD his God, and humbled himself greatly before the God of his fathers,"

2 Chronicles 33:13 "And prayed unto him: and he was entreated of him, and heard his supplication, and brought him again to Jerusalem into his kingdom. Then Manasseh knew that the LORD he [was] God."

It appears, from this, that suddenly Manasseh remembered the God of his father and prayed to him for forgiveness and help. God heard his prayer and restores him as king of Judah. Manasseh had killed many of the prophets, probably, because they told him what he was doing was wrong. It is such a wonderful thing to see the forgiveness of God in action as this. Because God answered the prayer of Manasseh, he believed.

2 Chronicles 33:14 "Now after this he built a wall without the city of David, on the west side of Gihon, in the valley, even to the entering in at the fish gate, and compassed about Ophel, and raised it up a very great height, and put captains of war in all the fenced cities of Judah."

He was restored as king of Judah, and began to rebuild the city wall. He even restored the army of Judah.

2 Chronicles 33:15 "And he took away the strange gods, and the idol out of the house of the LORD, and all the altars that he had built in the mount of the house of the LORD, and in Jerusalem, and cast [them] out of the city."

He went back and tried to make ammends for all of the false worship he had established. He tore down the places of idol worship, and removed the evil idols in the house of the LORD. It appears, he had truly repented for his sins.

2 Chronicles 33:16 "And he repaired the altar of the LORD, and sacrificed thereon peace offerings and thank offerings, and commanded Judah to serve the LORD God of Israel."

These were both voluntary offerings. He had completely turned around, and commanded Judah to do the same.

2 Chronicles 33:17 "Nevertheless the people did sacrifice still in the high places, [yet] unto the LORD their God only."

Their worship of the LORD was mixed with false worship, because they used the high places, instead of the temple in Jerusalem for worship.

2 Chronicles 33:18 "Now the rest of the acts of Manasseh, and his prayer unto his God, and the words of the seers that spake to him in the name of the LORD God of Israel, behold, they [are written] in the book of the kings of Israel."

The reference, here, could be speaking of the 2nd book of Kings chapter 21. The seers, spoken of here, are, possibly, speaking of the prophets, who had warned Manasseh of his evil ways.

2 Chronicles 33:19 "His prayer also, and [how God] was entreated of him, and all his sins, and his trespass, and the places wherein he built high places, and set up groves and graven images, before he was humbled: behold, they [are] written among the sayings of the seers."

There seemed to be records kept by the prophets of that day. Perhaps, this is speaking of those records. Many of the historians had a great deal to say about this. Whether the prophets had written down his sins or not, God was keeping records. God knows everything that Manasseh did, and He, also, knows everything you and I have done. Some day all of the records will be opened. Thank goodness, our sins have been erased, if we have accepted Jesus as our Saviour.

2 Chronicles 33:20 "So Manasseh slept with his fathers, and they buried him in his own house: and Amon his son reigned in his stead."

This is, possibly, speaking of a burial plot in the garden of his own home. He had, possibly, prepared the place. Amon would be an evil king.

2 Chronicles 33:21 "Amon [was] two and twenty years old when he began to reign, and reigned two years in Jerusalem."

Amon was born relatively late in Manasseh’s life. He would have been 45, when Ammon was born. The oldest son usually becomes king. If Manaseh had other sons, he had, probably, sacrificed them in the fire to Molech. It appears, this evil son of Manasseh reigned 2 years.

2 Chronicles 33:22 "But he did [that which was] evil in the sight of the LORD, as did Manasseh his father: for Amon sacrificed unto all the carved images which Manasseh his father had made, and served them;"

He, probably, began worshipping these false gods, when Manasseh set them up in Jerusalem. When Manasseh repented of his sins and returned to God, it seems Amon did not repent of his sins. He continued to worship false gods.

2 Chronicles 33:23 "And humbled not himself before the LORD, as Manasseh his father had humbled himself; but Amon trespassed more and more."

His father had made this same mistake, but he had repented. Amon was too proud. He did not repent, nor turn from his wicked ways. His sins became more and more, instead of less.

2 Chronicles 33:24 "And his servants conspired against him, and slew him in his own house."

They actually slew him in his own bed.

2 Chronicles 33:25 "But the people of the land slew all them that had conspired against king Amon; and the people of the land made Josiah his son king in his stead."

Josiah would be more like Hezekiah. He did right in the sight of the LORD. He had his father’s murderers killed.

2 Chronicles 33 Questions

1. How old was Manasseh, when he began to reign?

2. How many years did he reign?

3. He did that which was ________ in the sight of the LORD.

4. What prophet do historians say he had sawn assunder?

5. What did he do in direct opposition to what Hezekiah had done?

6. What did he put in the courts of the house of the LORD?

7. What terrible thing did he do in the valley of Hinnom?

8. What false god was this?

9. The __________ and Moabites had been following these practices.

10. What are some of these evils, that are present in our society today?

11. What did he put in the house of the LORD?

12. How could Judah have been blessed of God?

13. Who did Manasseh cause to sin?

14. Who captured Manasseh?

15. Where did they take him?

16. When did he seek the LORD?

17. Did God forgive him?

18. What did he do, as soon as he returned to Jerusalem?

19. What kind of offerings did he make unto the LORD?

20. Who were the seers in 2 Chronicles 33:18?

21. Where is the rest of this about Manasseh recorded?

22. Where did the bury Manasseh?

23. Who reigned in his stead?

24. Why do you suppose the son of his old age reigned?

25. What type king was Amon?

26. How was he killed?

27. Josiah would be more like __________.

Verses 1-10

2Ch 33:1-10

Introduction

THE WICKED REIGNS OF MANASSEH AND ANTON

XIII. MANASSEH (687-642 B.C.)

All of the material in this chapter is parallel with 2 Kings 21, except 2 Chronicles 33:11-17 which relate the conversion of Manasseh. Our comments on this chapter are found in the parallel passages in our commentary on Second Kings. Here we shall focus attention upon the material peculiar to this chapter.

2 Chronicles 33:1-10

A SUMMARY OF MANASSEH’S EVIL RULE OVER JUDAH

"Manasseh was twelve years old when he began to reign; and he reigned fifty and five years in Jerusalem. And he did that which was evil in the sight of Jehovah, after the abominations of the nations whom Jehovah cast out before the children of Israel. For he built again the high places which Hezekiah his father had broken down; and he reared up altars for the Baalim, and made Asheroth, and worshipped all the host of heaven, and served them. And he built altars in the house of Jehovah, whereof Jehovah said, In Jerusalem shall my name be for ever. And he built altars for all the host of heaven in the two courts of the house of Jehovah. He also made his children to pass through the fire in the valley of the son of Hinnom; and he practiced augury, and used enchantments, and practiced sorcery, and dealt with them that had familiar spirits, and with wizards: he wrought much evil in the sight of Jehovah, to provoke him to anger. And he set the graven image of the idol, which he had made, in the house of God, of which God said to David and to Solomon his son, In this house, and in Jerusalem which I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel, will I put my name for ever: neither will I any more remove the foot of Israel from off the land which I have appointed for your fathers, if only they will observe to do all that I have commanded them, even all the law and the statutes and the ordinances given by Moses. And Manasseh seduced Judah, and the inhabitants of Jerusalem, so that they did evil more than the nations whom Jehovah destroyed before the children of Israel. And Jehovah spake to Manasseh, and to his people; but they gave no heed."

The date for Manasseh’s reign given above indicates that a part of the fifty-five year reign mentioned in the text was probably as a co-regency under his father. We have often noted the difficulties in the chronology of Israel’s kings.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 33:1. The statement is again made that the king reigned in Jerusalem. The importance of it is in the fact that other cities had been capitals for the people of the Jews, but Jerusalem was the original and most authoritative one.

2 Chronicles 33:2. Manasseh was classed with the bad kings, but not as wicked as some of them. I wish the reader to note again the words evil in the sight of the Lord. The real test of whether a thing is right or wrong is if the Lord considers it so. Whom, the Lord cast out is said to give us a view of the evil that was in the life of Manasseh. He was guilty of the same kind of sins that caused God to cast out the heathen.

2 Chronicles 33:3. High places might not have been so bad (see comments at 1 Kings 3:2) had they not been used for an evil purpose, but when used in connection with other• things that denoted idolatry, they were wrong. Baalim was plural for Baal and expressed in that form because there were so many altars erected for sacrifices to that god. The groves were the sacred trees, whether planted for that purpose or appropriated to idolatry out of the forestry already growing. Host of heaven means the planets and other heavenly bodies.

2 Chronicles 33:4. This verse may be a little confusing unless the right words are emphasized. The house of the Lord was in Jerusalem, therefore no complaint could be made as to the place where the altars were built, had it been right to build them at all. But those altars represented the name of Baal, and that is the point of the criticism. The thought can be brought out by emphasizing the words altars and my name. It will then be seen that the sin committed was in building altars in that place, when the Lord had said that his name should be there. It was a question of whose name should be planted there.

2 Chronicles 33:5. The altars discussed in the previous verse were built in the main room of the house of the Lord for the worship of Baal. Manasseh then erected altars in the courts (adjoining rooms) of the house. These were for worship to the host of heaven, which means the sun and moon and other heavenly bodies.

2 Chronicles 33:6. Pass through the fire calls for the remarks at 2 Kings 16:3. The valley mentioned was a depression in the earth south of Jerusalem. That place was so named because of the use made of it by a wicked family named Hinnom. Among the various forms of worship for idolatry was the burning of human sacrifices. Observed times means he practiced witchcraft and consulted fortune tellers. All the rest of the verse pertains to the various forms and methods resorted to in seeking knowledge that human beings are not supposed to have. Not that men can actually learn the forbidden facts, but the desire and efforts to obtain them always will be displeasing to God. On the genuineness of the claim for this unlawful knowledge or information, let the reader see comments at 1 Samuel 28:12.

2 Chronicles 33:7. There were three methods of forming the images; cast or molten, hammered, and chiseled or carved. Manasseh had one of the last kind made and put in the house of God. The language of the verse is the same in meaning as 2 Chronicles 33:4.

2 Chronicles 33:8. The promise never to remove his people from the land was based on the conditions stated in the verse. So that they will take heed is another way of saying, if they will take heed, etc. The whole law is general and includes everything that Moses had delivered for their government. The other words are almost the same in meaning. Statutes means the formal enactments, and the ordinances holds out the idea of things that had been ordained, calling attention to the fact that there was authority behind them. By the hand of Moses is very significant in view of the efforts of the sabbatarians to discount the authority of Moses. Since these laws were given to the people from God, it does not lessen their authority and binding effect to have been given through this human agency.

2 Chronicles 33:9. To do worse than the heathen is comparative. In view of the advantages that the people of God had enjoyed, in the way of enlightenment and evidence, they should have been far above such foolish practices as the ones they did. With that all being considered, their conduct was truly said to be worse than the heathen.

2 Chronicles 33:10. In addition to the information stated in the preceding verse, God spoke directly to the king and his people about their conduct. Would not hearken is the same in thought as the statement of Isaiah in Ch. 1:3 of his book. It is there declared that the reason God’s people did not have any better knowledge of his way was, "my people doth not consider." A specific instance of such stubbornness is seen in the present case.

Verses 11-13

2Ch 33:11-13

2 Chronicles 33:11-13

THE CAPTIVITY OF MANASSEH IN BABYLON BY ASSYRIAN KINGS

"Wherefore Jehovah brought upon them the captains of the host of the king of Assyria, who took Manasseh in chains, and bound him with fetters, and carried him to Babylon. And when he was in distress he besought Jehovah his God, and humbled himself greatly before the God of his fathers. And he prayed unto him; and he was entreated of him, and heard his supplication, and brought him again to Jerusalem, unto his kingdom. Then Manasseh knew that Jehovah he was God."

This, of course, is information found nowhere else in the Bible; and it was once common among critics to reject this episode as unhistorical. Fortunately, wiser scholars now accept what is recorded here as authentic history. The Chronicler does not give us the date in Manasseh’s reign when this happened; but Ellison placed the event very late in Manasseh’s reign. "This explains why Manasseh’s repentance and reformation (2 Chronicles 33:12-17) are not mentioned in Kings, and why they left no lasting impression." This also explains why the altars of the host of heaven were apparently not removed by Manasseh. He was a vassal of Assyria and would have been afraid to remove them. Such subservience of Manasseh to the Assyrian overlords has been proved by the Babylonian inscriptions.

In the light of all the facts, there is no reason whatever to doubt a single word of what is recorded here. Jacob M. Myers also found nothing at all improbable about what is written here. "It may be taken for granted that vassal kings were allowed to return to their countries after being put under the threat of divine retribution with its terrible consequences."

J Barton Payne in Wycliffe Bible Commentary also dated this period of Manasseh’s conversion during the last six years of his reign. "It was perhaps in 648 B.C., when Ashurbanipal overcame a four-year revolt led by his brother in Babylon. Egypt took that opportunity to throw off the Assyrian yoke, and Manasseh might have attempted the same thing with less success. It was in that affliction that Manasseh humbled himself. God sometimes has to drive men to their conversion."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 33:11. This should not be confused with any of the national captivities. It was a special judgment upon Manasseh by which he was temporarily dethroned and taken off to Assyria. I shall quote from the history of Josephus on this event; Antiquities, book 10, chapter 3. "And when they perservered in the same course of life, God raised up war against them from the king of Babylon and Chaldea [that territory was then in control of the Assyrians], who sent an army against Judea, and laid waste the country; and caught king Manasseh by treachery, and ordered him to be brought to him, and had him under his power to inflict what punishment he pleased upon him."

2 Chronicles 33:12-13. The punishment brought Manasseh to repentance and prayer. God is ever compassionate toward those who become truly penitent, and he heard the prayer of this humiliated monarch and caused him to be released. In the same place in Josephus the history is continued as follows: "But then it was that Manasseh perceived what a miserable condition he as in, and esteeming himself the cause of all, he besought God to render his enemy human and merciful to him. Accordingly, God heard his prayer, and granted him what he prayed for. So Manasseh was released by the king of Babylon, and escaped the danger he was in."

Verses 14-17

2Ch 33:14-17

2 Chronicles 33:14-17

MANASSEH’S INEFFECTIVE REFORMS

"Now after this he built an outer wall to the city of David, on the west side of Gihon, in the valley, even to the entrance of the fish gate; and he compassed Ophel about with it, and raised it up to a very great height: and he put valiant captains in all the fortified cities of Judah. And he took away the foreign gods, and the idol out of the house of Jehovah, and all the altars that he had built in the mount of the house of Jehovah, and in Jerusalem, and cast them out of the city. And he built up the altar of Jehovah, and offered thereon sacrifices of peace-offerings and of thanksgiving, and commanded Judah to serve Jehovah, the God of Israel. Nevertheless the people sacrificed still in the high places, but only unto Jehovah their God."

The people sacrificed in the high places, but only unto Jehovah their God (2 Chronicles 33:17). "This was still contrary to the Mosaic Law and actually accomplished little more than apply a new name to the old Baal worship.”

These reforms in Manasseh’s reign came far too late to have much effect; and besides that, his reign probably was concluded before he had finished all that he planned to do.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 33:14-16. After his repentance Manasseh tried to "show his faith by his works." He improved the wall that was near the water supply which Hezekiah had arranged, which was on the west side of the city. He put military captains in all the fenced (walled) cities of Judah, and thus was concerned about the defense of the country. He not only improved the temporal features of the country, but was active for its religious interests also. He removed all the articles used in heathen worship in the temple, and cast them out of the city. The form of worship that had been going on in behalf of the heathen gods, naturally caused the true worship to be neglected and its altar to be let go down. Manasseh accordingly repaired it and proved his sincerity about it by offering sacrifices thereon. Peace offerings were one item of the major sacrifices prescribed by the law in Leviticus 3. Thank offerings were not necessarily any specified kind of offerings. The term has reference more to the motive or occasion for making the offering. After setting the example, he then commanded the people to serve the God of Israel, not those of the heathen about them. On this part of Manasseh’s reformation, Josephus gives us his account which I will quote, and it is in the same section of his history already copied from above and is as follows: "And when he was come to Jerusalem, he endeavored, if it were possible, to cast out of his memory those his former sins against God, of which he now repented, and to apply himself to a very religious life. He sanctified the temple, and purged the city, and for the remainder of his days he was intent on nothing but to return his thanks to God for his deliverance, and to preserve him propitious to him all his life long. He also instructed the multitude to do the same, as having very nearly experienced what a calamity he was fallen into by a contrary conduct. He also rebuilt the altar, and offered the legal sacrifices, as Moses commanded; and when he had re-established what concerned the divine worship, as it ought to be, he took care of the security of Jerusalem." The reader has frequently been cited to "outside" reading matter, and shown inspired examples for it by what some of the writers of the Bible have done. The Bible does not have need of human defenses, yet it is helpful and encouraging to find that authentic secular authors corroborate the statements of the inspired Word. Another thing, the Bible does not claim to give all the details of the subjects treated, and if the secular histories gives some more of them, it is perfectly in order for the student to avail himself of them.

2 Chronicles 33:17. See the remarks on high places at 1 Kings 3:2. That will help to understand why the subject is mentioned in the way it is here.

Verses 18-20

2Ch 33:18-20

2 Chronicles 33:18-20

CONCLUSION OF MANASSEH’S REIGN

"Now the rest of the acts of Manasseh, and his prayer unto his God, and the words of the seers that spake to him in the name of Jehovah, the God of Israel, behold, they are written among the acts of the kings of Israel. His prayer also, and how God was entreated of him, and all his sin and his trespass, and the places where he built high places, and set up the Asherim and the graven images, before he humbled himself, behold, they are written in the history of Hozai. So Manasseh slept with his fathers, and they buried him in his own house: And Anton his son reigned in his stead."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 33:18-19. Rest of the acts, etc. This is another reference to what we have been considering as "outside" reading, and explained at 1 Kings 14:9. The seers were prophets, and called by that name sometimes because of the meaning of the word. A prophet is able to see into the future, and would thus be a seer on the same principle that one who does, is a doer. God used these seers to admonish and otherwise instruct the king (Hebrews 1:1). In the comments on high places referred to in 2 Chronicles 33:17, a distinction was made between those places in view of the different motives and uses that were made of them. In this paragraph the word is used in its bad sense, for it is associated with the religious groves and graven images, and they were always idolatrous.

2 Chronicles 33:20. Slept with his fathers is explained at 1 Kings 2:10. The kings had their private homes in addition to their use of the palace. These homes had some land about them that could be used for various purposes. If a king had met the full favor of the public sentiment, he was buried in the special location set aside for the royal sepulchres. If it was otherwise, he was laid in some other place. In the case of Manasseh the burial was in the private grounds about his house.

Verses 21-25

2Ch 33:21-25

2 Chronicles 33:21-25

AMON (642-640 B.C.)

THE SHORT AND EVIL REIGN OF AMON

"Amon was twenty and two years old when he began to reign; and he reigned two years in Jerusalem. And he did that which was evil in the sight of Jehovah, as did Manasseh his father; and Anton sacrificed unto all the graven images which Manasseh his father had made, and served them. And he humbled not himself before Jehovah, as Manasseh his father had humbled himself; but this same Amon trespassed more and more. And his servants conspired against him and put him to death in his own house. But the people of the land slew all them that had conspired against king Amon; and the people of the land made Josiah his son king in his stead."

As Ellison remarked, "There are only minor variations here from the parallel in 2Kings. No motivation for the assassination is given. Amon may have been the vicious son of a bad father, or it may have been out of disgust for his following a discredited policy."

"Amon was the unhappy product of his father’s pagan life, not of his pious death."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 33:21. Amon received the throne by regular succession, being the son of the preceding king. He reigned in Jerusalem, an oft-repeated term. The force of it will be realized more, perhaps, if we were to word it, he reigned in Jerusalem; not Hebron or Shechem or Tirzah or Samaria. These places all had been used as headquarters for certain Jewish kings, but Jerusalem was the original and most authoritative capital.

2 Chronicles 33:22. What Amon did was approved by the people who were as evil as he, but in the sight of the Lord his doings were sinful. Sacrificed and served are used in a way to imply a distinction between them, which is true; but it is mainly in the sense of the degree in his devotion. To make sacrifice might merely mean to go through the formalities of the altar actions. Serve is from ABAD and Strong defines it, "a primitive root; to work (in any sense); by implication to serve, till, (causatively) enslave, etc." It therefore means to bend the energies of mind and body in a daily routine that practically enslaves one to the object of his admiration. Such a life would be commendable if lived in the service of the true God.

2 Chronicles 33:23. Amon did worse than his father in that he did not humbly repent of his sins. He trespassed more and more, which means, as expressed in the margin, that he multiplied his trespasses. Technically, this word means to encrouch upon the rights and property of another, but in this instance the original means something more serious. The first definition in the lexicon is "guiltiness, a fault." In the A. V. the word Is rendered by "sin" 4 times. The expression about Amon means that he got worse and worse in his sinful life, including all of his Idolatrous activities and daily conduct.

2 Chronicles 33:24. The life of Amon was so bad that he provoked his own personal servants to a rash action. Finding him in his own residence, they murdered him. This was an unlawful deed, for a man in authority should be removed by lawful means if done at all.

2 Chronicles 33:25. "Two wrongs do not make one right" is an old saying. It was evidently the principle on which the citizens of the nation acted in their treatment of the assassins. The sinful life of Amon did not justify the servants in murdering their king. The law of capital punishment would call for the execution of these servants. The people of the land, therefore, were acting lawfully when they slew the assassins of the king. His son would have become king through the established rule of succession, independent of the formalities of these citizens. But their ceremonies were to be a sort of public protest against the action of the murderers of the preceding king.

Bibliographical Information
"Commentary on 2 Chronicles 33". "Old & New Testament Restoration Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/onr/2-chronicles-33.html.
 
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