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Bible Commentaries
2 Chronicles 9

Old & New Testament Restoration CommentaryRestoration Commentary

Introduction

Second Chronicles Chapter 9

2 Chronicles 9:1 "And when the queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon, she came to prove Solomon with hard questions at Jerusalem, with a very great company, and camels that bare spices, and gold in abundance, and precious stones: and when she was come to Solomon, she communed with him of all that was in her heart."

1 Kings 10:1 "And when the queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon concerning the name of the LORD, she came to prove him with hard questions."

The addition of the statement "concerning the name of the LORD", I believe, is very important. The fame of Solomon and his kingdom had spread to the lands around them. This queen was very wealthy and came to see Solomon, bringing many camels laden with gifts. There were so many people named Sheba, that it is difficult to determine which of the persons the country of Sheba was named for. She had not only heard of Solomon’s great wealth, and magnificent buildings he had erected, but had heard of his great wisdom, as well.

2 Chronicles 9:2 "And Solomon told her all her questions: and there was nothing hid from Solomon which he told her not."

Solomon spent a great deal of time with her, as he would with any monarch of honor who visited him. He tried to answer her questions as fully as he could. He showed her his home and everything else she had wondered about. She, of course, was not allowed to see the ark.

2 Chronicles 9:3 "And when the queen of Sheba had seen the wisdom of Solomon, and the house that he had built,"

I am sure that Solomon informed her that his wisdom was a gift from God. No one could deny that he had great wisdom. His judgments were just, but filled with wisdom only God could have given him. A good example of this is how he settled the argument of the two women, over who the baby belonged to. His house was magnificent. There was gold and silver in abundance. Some of the greatest artisans of that day had done the engravings and decorations.

2 Chronicles 9:4 "And the meat of his table, and the sitting of his servants, and the attendance of his ministers, and their apparel; his cupbearers also, and their apparel; and his ascent by which he went up into the house of the LORD; there was no more spirit in her."

In 1 Kings chapter 4, we went into great detail on the amount of food furnished for Solomon’s table. Solomon, probably, had a state dinner in her honor. The food so far surpassed anything she had ever seen, and she was very impressed. Many exotic foods were brought in from other countries. Solomon had need for nothing. The sitting of the servants is, possibly, speaking of his officers, who would have been invited to such an affair. The finest apparel in all the world was Solomon’s. Even the stairs, that he ascended up into the house of the LORD by, were elegant. "There was no spirit in her" means it was so wonderful it took her breath away.

2 Chronicles 9:5 "And she said to the king, [It was] a true report which I heard in mine own land of thine acts, and of thy wisdom:"

2 Chronicles 9:6 "Howbeit I believed not their words, until I came, and mine eyes had seen [it]: and, behold, the one half of the greatness of thy wisdom was not told me: [for] thou exceedest the fame that I heard."

2 Chronicles 9:7 "Happy [are] thy men, and happy [are] these thy servants, which stand continually before thee, and hear thy wisdom."

She had heard of the greatness of Solomon and his kingdom, but she had not believed any of it, because it seemed impossible. Now that she had seen this, she was terribly impressed. It was far beyond even what she had heard. It seems, that all of the greatness of the buildings and the wealth they represented did not impress her as much, as the wisdom of Solomon.

2 Chronicles 9:8 "Blessed be the LORD thy God, which delighted in thee to set thee on his throne, [to be] king for the LORD thy God: because thy God loved Israel, to establish them for ever, therefore made he thee king over them, to do judgment and justice."

These words are those of the Queen of Sheba. We can take notice here, that the queen spoke of the LORD as the God of Solomon, not her own God. She recognized Him as powerful above other gods, but she did not express a desire for Him to be her God. This seems so strange, because she really gave the LORD credit for Solomon’s accomplishments.

2 Chronicles 9:9 "And she gave the king an hundred and twenty talents of gold, and of spices great abundance, and precious stones: neither was there any such spice as the queen of Sheba gave king Solomon."

120 talents of gold is speaking of $72,000,000.00 worth of gold at $400.00 per ounce. The spices of the part of Arabia, that she came from, were well known for being the finest in the world. The precious stones are not explained any further than here. This was a tremendously valuable gift to bring Solomon.

2 Chronicles 9:10 "And the servants also of Huram, and the servants of Solomon, which brought gold from Ophir, brought algum trees and precious stones."

2 Chronicles 9:11 "And the king made [of] the algum trees terraces to the house of the LORD, and to the king’s palace, and harps and psalteries for singers: and there were none such seen before in the land of Judah."

These terraces, made with the algum wood were, probably, the terraces that were spoken of earlier as the ascent for Solomon to the temple. The beautiful wood was used for musical instruments, as well. The decorations, and all of the grandeur associated with the temple and Solomon’s home were, probably, what greatly impressed the queen. This algum was, probably, red sandal-wood.

2 Chronicles 9:12 "And king Solomon gave to the queen of Sheba all her desire, whatsoever she asked, beside [that] which she had brought unto the king. So she turned, and went away to her own land, she and her servants."

We are not told exactly what Solomon gave to the Queen of Sheba. The things he gave her were, probably, things she could not get in her own land. Whatever Solomon gave her was even greater than what she had brought him.

2 Chronicles 9:13 "Now the weight of gold that came to Solomon in one year was six hundred and threescore and six talents of gold;"

The 666 talents of gold would have 999,000 ounces of gold. At $400.00 per ounce, that would be worth $399,000,000.00. This is almost beyond comprehension.

2 Chronicles 9:14 "Beside [that which] chapmen and merchants brought. And all the kings of Arabia and governors of the country brought gold and silver to Solomon."

There were so many ways that Solomon was getting all of this wealth. He received tribute money, he, probably, charged taxes, on the merchant seamen, as well. Of course, some of it was gifts from people, like the Queen of Sheba.

2 Chronicles 9:15 "And king Solomon made two hundred targets [of] beaten gold: six hundred [shekels] of beaten gold went to one target."

The targets contained about 300 ounces of gold for each target. A shekel is a half-ounce of gold. This target, on today’s market, would be worth $120,000.00 at $400.00 per ounce. The fact that they made targets of gold, shows just how plentiful it was.

2 Chronicles 9:16 "And three hundred shields [made he of] beaten gold: three hundred [shekels] of gold went to one shield. And the king put them in the house of the forest of Lebanon."

Again, these shields contained 150 ounces of gold for each shield. Each shield would be worth $60,000.00.

2 Chronicles 9:17 "Moreover the king made a great throne of ivory, and overlaid it with pure gold."

This is spoken of, again, in 1 Kings 10:19. The throne could have been inlaid with ivory, and the wood covered with gold. It, also, could have been solid gold over ivory.

2 Chronicles 9:18 "And [there were] six steps to the throne, with a footstool of gold, [which were] fastened to the throne, and stays on each side of the sitting place, and two lions standing by the stays:"

2 Chronicles 9:19 "And twelve lions stood there on the one side and on the other upon the six steps. There was not the like made in any kingdom."

The lions were on either end of each step going up to the throne. The lion was the emblem for the tribe of Judah. The fact that there were twelve represented the twelve tribes of Israel. These were beautifully carved.

2 Chronicles 9:20 "And all the drinking vessels of king Solomon [were of] gold, and all the vessels of the house of the forest of Lebanon [were of] pure gold: none [were of] silver; it was [not] any thing accounted of in the days of Solomon."

The gold was so abundant, that even the drinking cups were of gold. This is, probably, speaking of the area where the great banquets were held. There was much pomp associated with the reign of Solomon.

2 Chronicles 9:21 "For the king’s ships went to Tarshish with the servants of Huram: every three years once came the ships of Tarshish bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks."

We dealt with this in 1 Kings 10 22. The ships were a way to bring in the gold and the other items of trade. Tarshish was across from the coast of Africa. We are not sure whether each voyage took three years, or not. That would have been a long time to cover such a short distance. They could have made many stops, however.

2 Chronicles 9:22 "And king Solomon passed all the kings of the earth in riches and wisdom."

2 Chronicles 9:23 "And all the kings of the earth sought the presence of Solomon, to hear his wisdom, that God had put in his heart."

His gift of wisdom, that God had given him, was one of the reasons for his great wealth. There was no king before him, or after him, that had the wealth of Solomon. Of course, this does not include Jesus who owns everything.

2 Chronicles 9:24 "And they brought every man his present, vessels of silver, and vessels of gold, and raiment, harness, and spices, horses, and mules, a rate year by year."

The fact that these were brought year by year, indicates that this was tribute, or taxes. It appears, also, that Solomon accepted things as well as money for the tribute. Probably, Solomon had so much gold and silver, that he needed the animals, and harness, and raiment more than the gold.

2 Chronicles 9:25 "And Solomon had four thousand stalls for horses and chariots, and twelve thousand horsemen; whom he bestowed in the chariot cities, and with the king at Jerusalem."

This was the largest number of horses and chariots of any of his predecessors. It was more than his neighbors, as well. The fact that they were so well-equipped, probably, was one of the reasons they had peace. He had some of them in Jerusalem, but had many of them in the cities in the outskirts to protect Jerusalem.

2 Chronicles 9:26 "And he reigned over all the kings from the river even unto the land of the Philistines, and to the border of Egypt."

David had defeated these bordering countries in his reign, and Solomon kept them under subjection to himself.

2 Chronicles 9:27 "And the king made silver in Jerusalem as stones, and cedar trees made he as the sycomore trees that [are] in the low plains in abundance."

The cedars had been sent into this area by Hiram. They were not native to the land of Israel. The sycamore tree was native to the land, and that is the reason for this. The silver was so plentiful, they did not even bother to weigh it.

2 Chronicles 9:28 "And they brought unto Solomon horses out of 212 Egypt, and out of all lands."

The all lands, here, is speaking of the horses that came from Arabia, and Armenia.

2 Chronicles 9:29 "Now the rest of the acts of Solomon, first and last, [are] they not written in the book of Nathan the prophet, and in the prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite, and in the visions of Iddo the seer against Jeroboam the son of Nebat?"

These works, mentioned here, are not in the Bible. These are historical works of that day. Nathan had a great deal to do with Solomon, so his work should be very accurate. Both Ahijah and Iddo are mentioned in other Scriptures, and their works were, probably, highly regarded, as well.

2 Chronicles 9:30 "And Solomon reigned in Jerusalem over all Israel forty years."

Solomon reigned 40 years, and if he was 12 years old when he began to reign, he was about 52 when he died. We do not know for sure how old he was when he began to reign, but he was no more than a youth. His reign was in Jerusalem. The one outstanding thing he was remembered for, was the building of the temple.

2 Chronicles 9:31 "And Solomon slept with his fathers, and he was buried in the city of David his father: and Rehoboam his son reigned in his stead."

The city of David is, of course, Jerusalem. He was buried beside his father, David. Rehoboam would reign over Judah in the divided kingdom.

2 Chronicles 9 Questions

1. Why did the Queen of Sheba come to meet Solomon?

2. What did she bring for Solomon?

3. In 1 Kings, the same statement adds what?

4. What was she more interested in than the great wealth of Solomon?

5. What did Solomon tell her?

6. What was a good example of Solomon’s wisdom?

7. Why did the food for Solomon’s table impress her?

8. What does the statement "there was no spirit in her" mean?

9. After she had seen all of this and talked with Solomon, what was her reaction?

10. Who did she call God in 2 Chronicles 9:8?

11. How many talents of gold did she bring Solomon?

12. What other things did she bring him?

13. What had the servants of Huram brought Solomon?

14. What had Solomon made of the algum trees?

15. What did Solomon give the Queen of Sheba?

16. How many talents of gold came to Solomon in one year?

17. How many ounces of gold was this?

18. Where did some of the other gold come from?

19. How much gold was in one target?

20. How much gold was in one shield?

21. The throne was made of what?

22. How many steps led up to the throne?

23. What was at either end of each step?

24. What was the emblem of the tribe of Judah?

25. Why were there twelve of them?

26. What were the drinking vessels made of?

27. Quote 2 Chronicles 9:21.

28. What did all the other kings bring to Solomon?

29. What was meant by them being brought yearly?

30. How many chariots did Solomon have?

31. Silver in Jerusalem was as _____________.

32. How long did Solomon reign?

33. Where was the city of David?

Verses 1-8

2Ch 9:1-8

Introduction

CONCLUSION OF THE REIGN OF SOLOMON

VISIT OF THE QUEEN OF SHEBA

2 Chronicles 9:1-8

"And when the queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon, she came to prove Solomon with hard questions at Jerusalem, with a very great train, and camels that bare spices, and gold in abundance, and precious stones: and when she was come to Solomon, she communed with him of all that was in her heart. And Solomon told her all her questions; and there was not anything hid from Solomon which he told her not. And when the queen of Sheba had seen the wisdom of Solomon, and the house that he had built, and the food of his table, and the sitting of his servants, and the attendance of his ministers, and their apparel, his cupbearers also, and their apparel, and his ascent by which he went up into the house of Jehovah; there was no more spirit in her. And she said to the king, It was a true report which I heard in mine own land of thine acts and of thy wisdom. Howbeit I believed not their words, until I came, and mine eyes have seen it; and, behold, the half of the greatness of thy wisdom was not told me: thou exceedest the fame that I heard. Happy are thy men, and happy are these thy servants, that stand continually before thee, and hear thy wisdom. Blessed be Jehovah thy God, who delighteth in thee, to set thee on his throne, to be king for Jehovah thy God: because thy God loved Israel, to establish them for ever, therefore made he thee king over them, to do justice and righteousness."

(Concerning this visit of the queen of Sheba to Solomon, see the Commentary on First Kings). To summarize: (1) Sheba was most likely that Ethiopia over which Haile Selassie was the ruler during this century. (2) Solomon evidently was Haile Selassie’s ancestor through this Ethiopian queen.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 9:1. See the comments on 1 Kings 10:1 for this place.

2 Chronicles 9:2. Told her all her questions is a way of saying he gave her the answers to all her questions.

2 Chronicles 9:3. Seen the wisdom signifies that she had seen his wisdom proved.

2 Chronicles 9:4. Sitting of his servants refers to the orderly manner in which the servants of Solomon attended the meals. That systematic routine applied also to the services the various persons rendered to their master. The queen of Sheba observed also the grandeur of the whole array of architecture connected with the temple. No more spirit in her is figurative, meaning she was overcome with astonishment.

2 Chronicles 9:5-6. The report of Solomon’s splendor was great enough to bring this queen from a far country to see him. Notwithstanding it was that great, the report was not half as great as the facts would have justified. That is remarkable, for the common thing is for such reports to be exaggerated. It is a fine example of the faithfulness of God’s promises. We may misunderstand and incorrectly describe the good things to be received from God, but it would be impossible to overdraw the degree of his favors; we could not represent them in too high a quality.

2 Chronicles 9:7. The queen’s statement, ascribing happiness to the servants of Solomon, was based on the fact that they could hear the wisdom coming from him. What a wonderful conclusion it was she formed, placing wisdom above material advantages.

2 Chronicles 9:8. True love is often indicated by the kind of favor it leads one to bestow on the one loved. The queen of Sheba connected God’s love for Israel with his giving them this wise man for a king.

Verses 9-12

2Ch 9:9-12

2 Chronicles 9:9-12

QUEEN OF SHEBA AND SOLOMON EXCHANGE GIFTS

"And she gave the king a hundred and twenty talents of gold, and spices in great abundance, and precious stones: neither was there any such spice as the queen of Sheba gave to king Solomon. And the servants also of Huram, and the servants of Solomon, that brought gold from Ophir, brought algum trees and precious stones. And the king made of the algum trees terraces for the house of Jehovah, and for the king’s house, and harps and psalteries for the singers: and there was none such seen before in the land of Judah. And king Solomon gave to the queen of Sheba all her desire, whatsoever she asked, besides that which she had brought to the king. So she turned and went to her own land, she and her servants."

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 9:9. See my comments on Genesis 32:13 for the explanation of why the queen made these gifts to Solomon.

2 Chronicles 9:10. See 2 Chronicles 8:17-18 concerning this gold. The comments on the following verse will explain the algum trees.

2 Chronicles 9:11. The algum is called also the almug tree. According to Smith’s Bible Dictionary, it was a wood with line grain, and was of a beautiful garnet color. Terraces comes from a word that means a staircase. The timber of the algum tree would be well adapted for that use. Being hard and fine grained, it would be suitable also for the making of the musical instruments.

2 Chronicles 9:12. See the comments I have offered at 1 Kings 10:13 and 1 Chronicles 29:3 for explanation of this misunderstood passage.

Verses 13-16

2Ch 9:13-16

2 Chronicles 9:13-16

SOLOMON MULTIPLIES HIS SILVER AND GOLD

"Now the weight of gold that came to Solomon in one year was six hundred and threescore and six talents of gold, besides that which the merchants and traders brought: and all the kings of Arabia and the governors of the country brought gold and silver to Solomon. And king Solomon made two hundred bucklers of beaten gold; six hundred shekels of beaten gold went to one buckler. And he made three hundred shields of beaten gold; three hundred shekels of gold went to one shield: and the king put them in the house of the forest of Lebanon."

"And the kings ... and the governors ... brought gold and silver to Solomon" (2 Chronicles 8:14). These `gifts’ must not be understood as voluntary in any sense of the word. Solomon’s power which he had inherited from David gave him the means of extorting every possible penny out of the whole region. Solomon’s conduct, as the Chronicler has outlined it here, is an anthology of Solomon’s gross disobedience of all of God’s commandments. God had specifically warned Israel’s kings not to, "multiply unto themselves silver and gold," (Deuteronomy 17:16-17); and it would have been impossible for anyone to violate that commandment with any more contempt than did Solomon.

Also the Decalogue had specifically forbidden God’s people to make images or likenesses of anything either in heaven or upon earth; but look at what Solomon did in the matter of those images of lions on his throne.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 9:13-14. According to Moffatt’s translation, the 666 talents of gold was nearly 29 tons. Chapmen were wandering or traveling tradesmen, and they brought much gold to Solomon in the form of tariff. The merchants in general, also, paid tariff for the traffic privileges. The gold and silver that was turned over to Solomon from the kings and governors was in the form of tribute. This was exacted because Solomon "reigned over all kingdoms" in the territory named. (1 Kings 4:21.)

2 Chronicles 9:15-16. These articles were made for ornamental purposes and placed in this house for exhibition. House of the forest of Lebanon referred to the palace. This subject is explained in detail at 1 Kings 7:2 .

Verses 17-21

2Ch 9:17-21

SOLOMON’S GREAT THRONE OF IVORY AND GOLD

2 Chronicles 9:17-21

"Moreover the king made a great throne of ivory, and overlaid it with pure gold. And there were six steps to the throne, with a footstool of gold, which were fastened to the throne, and stays on either side by the place of the seat, and two lions standing beside the stays. And twelve lions stood there on the one side and on the other upon the six steps: there was not the like made in any kingdom. And all king Solomon’s drinking vessels were of gold, and all the vessels of the house of the forest of Lebanon were of pure gold: silver was nothing accounted of in the days of Solomon. For the king had ships that went to Tarshish with the servants of Huram; once every three years came the ships of Tarshish, bringing gold, and silver, and ivory, and apes, and peacocks."

Regarding that gold-plated, idolatrous throne:

In addition to all of the wealth brought to Solomon by his commercial ventures, "the governors of the country" (the provincial authorities in Israel, 2 Chronicles 8:14) were also subject to oppressive taxation, to such an extent that the northern tribes demanded an easement of the burden when Solomon’s son succeeded him. And what did Solomon do with all that wealth? He blew all of it in ostentatious decorations of his personal effects, "a footstool of gold"! What earthly benefit was there in a thing like that? It ministered to only one thing, Solomon’s colossal, conceited pride!

One thing is absolutely a mystery to this writer. How could any scholar ever have written a paragraph like the following?

These verses are closely paralleled in 1 Kings 10, the source upon which the writer relied. There was no reason to deviate from the source for it fitted quite well into his scheme for the glorification of King Solomon!

Contrary to this allegation, which is frequently parroted by critical scholars, a more eloquent or convincing condemnation of Solomon’s sinful conceit and violation of God’s Word, than that which we find right here, could not possibly have been written.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 9:17-19. Ivory is a pretty substance, yet it was covered and put out of sight with gold, another pretty material. But there was a physical reason for using ivory for the body of the throne. Its texture was such that it would be free from shrinkage, and it also would endure the test of bending by its flexibility. For more comments regarding these lions see 1 Kings 7 th chapter.

2 Chronicles 9:20. Silver was not anything accounted which means it was not thought much of in those days. Solomon’s glory (Matthew 6:29) consisted not only in the costliness of his wearing apparel, but also in the show and beauty of his articles of service.

2 Chronicles 9:21. According to Smith’s Bible Dictionary, this Tarshish was a seaport that could be reached through the Red Sea. The ships of the two kings, Solomon and Huram, united every three years in a trading voyage to this city. They brought to the realm of Israel a supply of useful materials such as named. The peacocks were used for ornamental purposes only, not for breeding, since the males only were brought. The apes were doubtless used merely for whimsical purposes.

Verses 22-28

2Ch 9:22-28

2 Chronicles 9:22-28

"So king Solomon exceeded all the kings of the earth in riches and wisdom. And all the kings of the earth sought the presence of Solomon, to hear his wisdom, which God had put in his heart. And they brought every man his tribute, vessels of silver, and vessels of gold, and raiment, armor, and spices, horses and mules, a rate year by year. And Solomon had four thousand stalls for horses and chariots, and twelve thousand horsemen, that he bestowed in the chariot cities, and with the king at Jerusalem. And he ruled over all the kings from the River even unto the land of the Philistines, and to the border of Egypt. And the king made silver to be in Jerusalem as stones, and cedars made he to be as the sycamore-trees that are in the lowland, for abundance. And they brought horses for Solomon out of Egypt, and out of all lands."

These verses concern Solomon’s riches and his alleged wisdom.

"Solomon exceeded all the kings ... in riches and wisdom" (2 Chronicles 8:22). Solomon’s wisdom was unrelated to what we know as true wisdom, that kind of wisdom is defined in God’s Word: "The fear of Jehovah is the beginning of wisdom; a good understanding have all they that do his commandments" (Psalms 111:10). The meaning of the word wisdom, as it was used by the Chronicler, was evidently something else. As the term was used by his self-seeking flatterers, it meant little or nothing; and it could be that the Chronicler here was using it in exactly the same way. One thing is certain; namely, that Solomon neither feared God nor honored his commandments.

The passage that we have so often cited in Deuteronomy 17:16-17 specifically forbade Israel’s kings to multiply unto themselves (1) wives, (2) silver and gold and (3) horses. Solomon wantonly violated all these commandments in the most extravagant manner.

"A rate year by year" (2 Chronicles 9:24). These words identify all those `gifts’ that came to Solomon by those rulers throughout the world of that era, as `taxes,’ or `tribute,’ imposed, not occasionally, but continually year by year. This also explains why they, "sought the presence of Solomon to hear his wisdom." Their fulsome compliments paid to Solomon were nothing but the flattery of vassal underlings seeking to make a good impression on the conceited Solomon, whom they unwillingly served as his vassals.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 9:22. The reader is given such declarations as this verse to impress him with the fulfillment of God’s promises. (1 Kings 3:13.)

2 Chronicles 9:23. The inspired writer is the one who says that God put the wisdom in the heart of Solomon. This should be considered by those who deny that Solomon was inspired. It is true that all good things come from God, and the wisdom a man has naturally could be said to have been put in his heart by the Lord. But Solomon already had that when God made the promise of 1 Kings 3:12, which shows that the wisdom he had was a direct gift from God, which is the same as inspiration.

2 Chronicles 9:24. These "presents" were official tokens of recognition of and subjection to Solomon, according to the practices of the times. See the comments at Genesis 32:13.

2 Chronicles 9:25. This account does not agree, in figures, with 1 Kings 4:26. I have gone into detail at that place, and the reader is requested to consult it.

2 Chronicles 9:26. The river refers to the Euphrates River. This is not learned from the lexicon, because the original could mean any body of water that had some prominence. But other passages that deal with the same subject name the river. (Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 11:24.) Land of the Philistines refers to the western boundary since that narrow tract lay along the Mediterranean Sea. The border of Egypt has the same significance as river of Egypt which was part of the southern boundary of the promised land. This whole territory had been promised to Abraham and his seed. (Genesis 15:18.) Solomon was the first man fully to realize the enjoyment of that much territory, due to the disobedience of the national leaders.

2 Chronicles 9:27. Stones and sycamore trees were very common. Solomon’s resources were so great that gold was as plentiful in Jerusalem as stones had been, and the elegant cedars were as numerous in Jerusalem as the sycamore trees were in the lowlands.

2 Chronicles 9:28. This was a violation of Deuteronomy 17:16-17. God was lenient toward Solomon for the sake of David, and did not punish him directly for this error.

Verses 29-31

2Ch 9:29-31

2 Chronicles 9:29-31

DEATH OF SOLOMON

ACCESSION OF REHOBOAM

"Now the rest of the acts of Solomon, first and last, are they not written in the history of Nathan the prophet, and in the prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite, and in the visions of Iddo the seer concerning Jeroboam the son of Nebat? And Solomon reigned in Jerusalem over all Israel forty years. And Solomon slept with his fathers, and he was buried in the city of David his father: and Rehoboam his son reigned in his stead."

The important thing here is the Chronicler’s mention of several of his sources. (See our Introduction to this volume for a more complete list of these.) We reject as worthless the allegation of some critics that the Chronicler invented or composed much of his material; for it is quite evident that he followed all of his sources very accurately, a fact indicated by the truth that he was careful in the use of 1Kings, a source that we know he used.

As often noted, the only reason for the critic’s rejection of much of the material in Chronicles is the havoc that it plays with a number of their favorite fairy tales, such as (1) the gradual evolution of Israel’s conception of the person and nature of God, (2) the discovery of that alleged Deuteronomic document in the reign of Josiah, and (3) the late dating of the Mosaic Pentateuch.

The death of Solomon and the accession of his harem-bred son Rehoboam marked the end of the united kingdom and the beginning of a long chain of tragic events that would result in the destruction of Jerusalem and the temple, and the Babylonian captivity of the People of God.

E.M. Zerr:

2 Chronicles 9:29. There were many books written in the days of the kings that were never made a part of the Bible. But they were good histories, and were referred to very often for the benefit of the readers who might wish more detailed information.

2 Chronicles 9:30-31. All Israel could be understood as a contrast with the partial rule of David. He had the rule over one tribe only for seven years, then received it over the whole nation. Slept with his fathers. See 1 Kings 2:10.

Bibliographical Information
"Commentary on 2 Chronicles 9". "Old & New Testament Restoration Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/onr/2-chronicles-9.html.
 
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