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Bible Commentaries
Micah 7

Old & New Testament Restoration CommentaryRestoration Commentary

Verses 1-6

Mic 7:1-6

Lamentations Over the Spiritual State of God’s People (Micah 7:1-6)

Woe is me! For I am as when they have gathered the summer fruits, as the grape gleanings of the vintage: there is no cluster to eat; my soul desires the first-ripe fig. The godly man is perished out of the earth, and there is none upright among men: they all lie in wait for blood; they hunt every man his brother with a net. Their hands are upon that which is evil to do it diligently; the prince asks, and the judge is ready for a reward; and the great man, he utters the evil desire of his soul: thus they weave it together” (Micah 7:1-3).

It is somewhat difficult to determine who is saying, Woe is me.” It could be Micah, the land, or the people themselves. It seems more likely that it is the whole of the land. Micah compares the outlook of God’s people to a season of summer fruits coming and going to the point of no more available fruit. The land has no godly and upright among men.” The hands of present men are diligently fixed on evil rather than righteousness. The prince and judge are motivated by covetous desires and the great man by the evil desire of his soul.” Where is the diligence and desire to follow God’s ways (Philippians 3:14; 2 Timothy 2:15)? What has happened to the Lord’s people? The wicked weave their plans together and thereby are praised for their common evil deeds (cf. Hosea 7:3).

The best of them is as a briar; the most upright is worse than a thorn hedge: the day of thy watchmen, even thy visitation, is come; now shall be their perplexity” (Micah 7:4).

The watchmen of old had spiritual foresight and warned of a day when God’s people would be visited with judgment due to their wicked deeds (see Ezekiel 3:17). When God looks upon His people He sees that the best of them is as a briar in that he wounds all those who come his way. The one who would be deemed upright is worse than a thorn hedge.” The people’s sin of injustice and idolatry has caused them to be a threat to others physical and spiritual well being. Micah proclaims, now shall be their perplexity.” Why would Israel be baffled or puzzled over God’s judgments against them? Because they made their sacrifices as He had commanded (Micah 6:6-7) and were deluded into thinking that all was well (see Micah 3:11). Jesus tells us that many on the Day of Judgment will be just as perplexed (cf. Matthew 7:22) (Consider Jeremiah 2:22; Jeremiah 4:22; Jeremiah 13:22; Jeremiah 16:10).

Trust ye not in a neighbor; put ye not confidence in a friend; keep the doors of thy mouth from her that lies in thy bosom. For the son dishonors the father, the daughter rises up against her mother, the daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law; a man’s enemies are the men of his own house (Micah 7:5-6).

Truly the days were evil (cf. Micah 2:3 and Amos 5:13). When one cannot trust a neighbor, friend, wife, son, daughter and a man’s enemies are those within his home truly the days are wicked.

Verses 7-13

Mic 7:7-13

The Remnant Speaks (Micah 7:7-13)

But as for me, I will look unto Jehovah; I will wait for the God of my salvation: my God will hear me” (Micah 7:7).

There were those, like Micah, who continued to have faith in Jehovah God. These, unfortunately, lived in horrid days when unfaithfulness was the norm. These people of faith were able to recognize the hopeless state of their physical kingdom and thereby could only hope in God’s promises. Salvation truly awaited the one who patiently awaited God’s promises.

Rejoice not against me, O mine enemy: when I fall, I shall arise; when I sit in darkness, Jehovah will be a light unto me” (Micah 7:8).

Again we are reminded of nations such as Edom that actually rejoiced over the fall of Jerusalem; however, the land speaks and exclaims that such times of calamity will not be a cause for real happiness. God will certainly raise His people, they shall come again to their home land, and it will be rebuilt. Though the present hour is dark and gloomy Jehovah will once again bring a bright ray of hope.

I will bear the indignation of Jehovah, because I have sinned against him, until he plead my cause, and execute judgment for me: he will bring me forth to the light, and I shall behold his righteousness. Then mine enemy shall see it, and shame shall cover her who said unto me, Where is Jehovah thy God? Mine eyes shall see my desire upon her; now shall she be trodden down as the mire of the streets” (Micah 7:9-10).

Those worthy of God’s salvation are those who recognize that the punishment that they are about to experience is due to their sin against Jehovah God. With the heavy weight of punishment bearing down upon Israel in the form of Assyria the remnant of God’s people exclaim words of faith, God will save. The nations against Israel and Judah will desire to see her fall yet when she rises from the dust of punishment they shall be filled with shame for they shall recognize then that Jehovah is God (cf. Micah 4:11).

A day for building thy walls! In that day shall the decree be far removed. In that day shall they come unto thee from Assyria and the cities of Egypt, and from Egypt even to the River, and from sea to sea, and from mountain to mountain. Yet shall the land be desolate because of them that dwell therein, for the fruit of their doings” (Micah 7:11-13).

There appears to be a double meaning here much like as found at 2 Samuel 7:12 ff. God had promised David that through his seed His kingdom would be established forever. This was obtained first through Solomon but later through the Christ. Likewise, God would bring back His people from Babylonian captivity under Zerubbabel to rebuild the walls around the city of Jerusalem but even further His people shall have a wall built round about them that is comprised of God’s eternal being (cf. Zechariah 2:5). In that day thereby refers to the Messianic age when men and women shall come to the kingdom of God from all parts of the world. While the world of sinful men wallows in a land of desolation in that day the people of God shall be blessed.

Verses 14-17

Mic 7:14-17

THE PROPHET PRAYS FOR HIS PEOPLE (Micah 7:14-17)

If one requires proof of Micah’s highest motives in writing the scathing denunciations against his people which make up the greater part of this book, his prayer for the returning remnant certainly provides it amply.

CARMEL – BASHAN - GILEAD - THE DAYS OF

THEIR COMING FORTH OUT OF EGYPT (Micah 7:14-15)

When Joshua and Caleb returned to Moses after having spied out the promised land, they reported it was a land flowing with milk and honey. Micah’s prayer is it shall be that way again when the people return. One can stand today among the lush forests in the plain of Megiddo at the foot of Mount Carmel and marvel at the beauty of the land as it has recently been reclaimed by today’s returnees from exile. They found the region a miserable swamp and turned it into a garden. So does the prophet pray that God’s people after Babylon shall reclaim their land. Bashan was famous for its cattle, Gilead for its healing balm. Micah asks God on behalf of the remnant that it may be so again.

Zerr: Micah 7:14. Feed (or rule or guide) thy people is Micah’s way of predicting that God would again care for His people after they have gone through (heir desolation period. Micah 7:15. The reference to ’the day of Egypt is for comparison. Israel was brought out of bondage in that country. and she will also be released from Babylonian captivity.

THE NATIONS SHALL SEE AND BE ASHAMED (Micah 7:16-17)

This prediction concerning the neighbors of Israel is easily seen demonstrated both in ancient and modern times. Just as those who returned from Babylon set about to rebuild, so the modern Israeli loves his land. Hillsides once eroded through neglect and poor husbandry are covered with verdant vegetation. What was formerly barren wilderness now is home for the unique farming communes of Israel. The nations who mistreated this land, both in ancient and modern times have ample reason to be ashamed. (Micah 7:16)

Zerr: Micah 7:16. In view of the comparatively small number in Israel at the time of the release, it will be a surprise to see their accomplishments. Lag their hand upon their month indicates that the circumstance will be so marvelous in the eyes of the heathen that they will not be able to say anything. Micah 7:17. Lick the dust is a figurative prediction of the humiliation of the heathen nations when they see the triumph of Israel. Be afraid of the Lord our God means they will be stunned with awe and forced to respect the might of the God of Israel.

Questions

Jehovah’s Controversy With His People

1. Micah chapters six and seven are composed of a series of __________.

2. Just as the sins of society’s leaders filter down through all classes so __________ are applied to all people.

3. Jehovah’s first controversy with His people is occasioned by their having forgotten __________.

4. God’s controversy with His people is before all creation because __________.

5. How does Micah connect the final section of his book to the first section?

6. In Micah 6:3-5 the __________ is made. In Micah 6:9 to Micah 7:6, the case will be __________.

7. The cry of Micah 6:3-5 is the plea of a __________.

8. Explain Micah’s reference to Balaam. (Micah 6:5)

9. Why “remember from Shittim to Gilgal”? (Micah 6:5(b))

10. Show how Micah 6:1-5 is timely in our day.

11. What is alluded to by “shall I give my first-born for my transgression”? (Micah 6:7 (b))

12. Discuss Micah 6:8 in connection with Matthew 26:16 and Hebrews 2:1-4,

13. God’s insistence upon faithfulness is not unreasonable when we remember __________ His __________ and __________.

14. How does Micah answer the question, “what doth Jehovah require of thee?” (Micah 6:8)

15. The __________ is the Bible quoted by Jesus and the apostles.

16. Micah 6:8 does not claim that __________ an attribute of God’s character is required of God’s people.

17. Rather than compassion, Micah insists that we are required to __________.

18. Discuss Micah 6:8 in connection with Matthew 23:23.

19. Why must the outward forms of obedience always be expressive of inner reality?

20. Compare Micah 6:9 and Proverbs 9:10.

21. What is the significance of “shall I be pure?” Micah 6:10-12

22. The persistent fact of __________ is a prime factor in Micah’s message.

23. Compare Micah 6:14 and Job 20:15.

24. What is meant by Micah 6:15?

25. What are “the statutes of Omri”? Micah 6:15(a)

26. Compare Micah 6:16(b) and Micah 3:12.

27. Discuss the historic phenomena known as “anti-semitism” in light of Micah 6:16.

28. Compare Micah 7:1-2(a) and Psalms 14:1-2.

29. Discuss Micah 7:1-2 in light of Romans 3:9-18.

30. Micah 7:2(b) – Micah 7:4(a) refers to __________.

31. Compare Micah 7:2(b) – Micah 7:4(a) with 2 Samuel 23:6-7, Isaiah 55:13, and Ezekiel 2:6.

32. Who are listed as those whom honest men cannot trust? (Micah 7:5-6)

33. Discuss Micah 7:5-6 in connection with Matthew 10:35-36 and Luke 12:53.

34. Discuss Micah 7:7 in connection with Joshua 24:14-15.

35. Despite the wickedness of his time, Micah is unshaken in the conviction that __________.

36. Discuss Micah 7:8-10 in light of Romans 8:31-39.

37. Compare Micah 7:9 to Psalms 22:1-24 and Romans 7:24 to Romans 8:1.

38. What is meant by “a day for rebuilding thy walls”? (Micah 7:11-13)

39. If one requires proof of Micah’s highest motives in writing his prophecies, his prayer for __________ provides it amply.

40. The nations shall see what and be ashamed?

Verses 14-20

Mic 7:14-20

The Faithful Remnant lift up their Voice in Prayer (Micah 7:14-20)

Feed thy people with thy rod, the flock of thy heritage, which dwell solitarily, in the forest in the midst of Carmel: let them feed in Bashan and Gilead, as in the days of old, as in the days of thy coming forth out of the land of Egypt will I show unto them marvelous things” (Micah 7:14-15).

The rod or staff would guide the Lord’s people into solitary areas (i.e. away from the world of sin and thereby sanctified cf. 2 Corinthians 6:17 ff). Jehovah would show forth His power through the Christ and His apostles as He did when he brought Israel out of Egypt. The signs and miracles worked by Jesus and the apostles were truly mighty works that caused amazement to those who witnessed them (cf. Luke 9:43; Acts 2:7-12 etc.).

The nations shall see and be ashamed of all their might; they shall lay their hand upon their mouth; their ears shall be deaf. They shall lick the dust like a serpent; like crawling things of the earth they shall come trembling out of their close places; they shall come with fear unto Jehovah our God, and shall be afraid because of thee” (Micah 7:16-17).

When Philip preached at Samaria and performed mighty works by the power of God all those who followed after Simon the sorcerer dropped what they were doing and followed God (cf. Acts 8:6 ff). God’s power would be demonstrated in ways that no one could refute. When the power was displayed men obeyed the gospel message (cf. Mark 16:20).

Who is a God like unto thee, that pardons iniquity, and passes over the transgression of the remnant of his heritage? He retains not his anger for ever, because he delights in lovingkindness. He will again have compassion upon us; he will tread our iniquities under foot; and thou wilt cast all their sins into the depths of the sea” (Micah 7:18-19).

The prayer of the remnant of God’s people takes into consideration the identity of God. Who is a God like unto thee?” The answer is simple, there is no God like Jehovah (cf. Isaiah 46:9-10). The wonderful character traits of God are kindness, slow to anger, and compassionate. Though humanity is wicked God is patient and kind. He will forgive man of their iniquities and cast their sins into the depths of the sea (i.e., out of site and mind). God not only forgives but forgets the sins of the humble and repentant (cf. Jeremiah 31:34).

Thou wilt perform the truth to Jacob, and the lovingkindness to Abraham, which thou hast sworn unto our fathers from the days of old” (Micah 7:20).

What truth to Jacob and Abraham had God sworn unto our fathers from the days of old?” What will God perform in relation to this truth?” The context of this chapter suggests that the Lord shall perform the act of forgiving men of their sins. This was the promise made to Abraham and Jacob and fulfilled through Jesus Christ (cf. Genesis 12:1 ff; Galatians 3:8; Galatians 3:16). The book of Micah ends. These final words do not give man a formula for success in this life. We do not find suggestions that may help me to gain riches in this world. Success, from God’s standpoint, is achieving the forgiveness of sins. Sin is man’s main concern at any given point of one’s life. To be forgiven of a violation of God’s will is to obtain the greatest blessing man could ever experience (cf. Ephesians 1:3 ff). Those who fail to grasp this most important aspect of our life will forever feel the pain of failure.

Verses 18-20

Mic 7:18-20

PRAYER OF PROPHETIC PRAISE (Micah 7:18-20)

Micah is overwhelmed by the knowledge that, though He must now punish His people for their utter faithlessness, He will not only deliver a remnant, but will bless their lands and humiliate their enemies. Jehovah is praised for His great glory, His readiness to forgive and His faithfulness to the ancient promises of the covenant. Although He is just and does punish, He “delighteth in lovingkindness.” No one who knows Micah’s God can possibly see any contrast between Him and the God of Love revealed in the New Testament.

Zerr: Micah 7:18. The most wonderful feature of God’s treatment of his unfaithful people is his willingness to forgive them. Their many abominations would seem to justify their utter extinction, yet His great love preserved them and restored them again to their home land after the necessary punishment had been administered. Micah 7:19. Subdue our iniquities has special reference to the complete cure of idolatry that the captivity effected upon Israel. See the historical note on this subject with the comments on Isaiah 1:25. Micah 7:20. Perform the truth means that God will prove the truth of all His promises to Jacob or Israel, which had first been made to Abraham the founder of the race.

Questions

Jehovah’s Controversy With His People

1. Micah chapters six and seven are composed of a series of __________.

2. Just as the sins of society’s leaders filter down through all classes so __________ are applied to all people.

3. Jehovah’s first controversy with His people is occasioned by their having forgotten __________.

4. God’s controversy with His people is before all creation because __________.

5. How does Micah connect the final section of his book to the first section?

6. In Micah 6:3-5 the __________ is made. In Micah 6:9 to Micah 7:6, the case will be __________.

7. The cry of Micah 6:3-5 is the plea of a __________.

8. Explain Micah’s reference to Balaam. (Micah 6:5)

9. Why “remember from Shittim to Gilgal”? (Micah 6:5(b))

10. Show how Micah 6:1-5 is timely in our day.

11. What is alluded to by “shall I give my first-born for my transgression”? (Micah 6:7 (b))

12. Discuss Micah 6:8 in connection with Matthew 26:16 and Hebrews 2:1-4,

13. God’s insistence upon faithfulness is not unreasonable when we remember __________ His __________ and __________.

14. How does Micah answer the question, “what doth Jehovah require of thee?” (Micah 6:8)

15. The __________ is the Bible quoted by Jesus and the apostles.

16. Micah 6:8 does not claim that __________ an attribute of God’s character is required of God’s people.

17. Rather than compassion, Micah insists that we are required to __________.

18. Discuss Micah 6:8 in connection with Matthew 23:23.

19. Why must the outward forms of obedience always be expressive of inner reality?

20. Compare Micah 6:9 and Proverbs 9:10.

21. What is the significance of “shall I be pure?” Micah 6:10-12

22. The persistent fact of __________ is a prime factor in Micah’s message.

23. Compare Micah 6:14 and Job 20:15.

24. What is meant by Micah 6:15?

25. What are “the statutes of Omri”? Micah 6:15(a)

26. Compare Micah 6:16(b) and Micah 3:12.

27. Discuss the historic phenomena known as “anti-semitism” in light of Micah 6:16.

28. Compare Micah 7:1-2(a) and Psalms 14:1-2.

29. Discuss Micah 7:1-2 in light of Romans 3:9-18.

30. Micah 7:2(b) – Micah 7:4(a) refers to __________.

31. Compare Micah 7:2(b) – Micah 7:4(a) with 2 Samuel 23:6-7, Isaiah 55:13, and Ezekiel 2:6.

32. Who are listed as those whom honest men cannot trust? (Micah 7:5-6)

33. Discuss Micah 7:5-6 in connection with Matthew 10:35-36 and Luke 12:53.

34. Discuss Micah 7:7 in connection with Joshua 24:14-15.

35. Despite the wickedness of his time, Micah is unshaken in the conviction that __________.

36. Discuss Micah 7:8-10 in light of Romans 8:31-39.

37. Compare Micah 7:9 to Psalms 22:1-24 and Romans 7:24 to Romans 8:1.

38. What is meant by “a day for rebuilding thy walls”? (Micah 7:11-13)

39. If one requires proof of Micah’s highest motives in writing his prophecies, his prayer for __________ provides it amply.

40. The nations shall see what and be ashamed?

Bibliographical Information
"Commentary on Micah 7". "Old & New Testament Restoration Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/onr/micah-7.html.
 
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