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Bible Commentaries

Sermon Bible Commentary

2 Chronicles 34

Verses 1-3

2 Chronicles 34:1-3

I. The story of Josiah shows that a child may become a Christian very early in life. He was but fifteen years old when he is spoken of as "seeking the God of his father David."

That was the first that people knew of it. But probably he had been a prayerful boy long before that.

II. The narrative of this young king shows also that young persons may become Christians without the excitement of a revival. When Josiah began the reformation of his kingdom, he stood absolutely alone. He started the revival by being the first convert.

III. King Josiah's conversion shows that a young person may become a Christian just at the time when the pleasures of the world are most attractive.

IV. The story of Josiah shows that a child may be a Christian without being unmanly or unwomanly. Judah never had a more spirited and gallant prince. He put down the bad men of the realm right and left most valiantly. Not one of them dared to insult him.

V. The story of Josiah suggests also that one who becomes a Christian early in life is likely to become a better man than one who first lives through a career of sin.

VI. The story of Josiah suggests that the way for a young person to become a Christian is to make a business of doing right.

A. Phelps, The Old Testament a Living Book, p. 161.

Reference: 2 Chronicles 34:1-4 . Sermons for Boys and Girls, p. 338.

Verse 3

2 Chronicles 34:3

Notice:

I. When Josiah's religious life began. The text tells us it was "while he was yet young." As a mere boy, he evinced a beautiful character, and gave promise of a virtuous life. His religious life really began about his sixteenth year.

II. What was the complexion of Josiah's piety? There is something suggestive in the expression "He began to seek the God of David his father." (1) It is an unspeakable blessing to have been born in the line of a Christian parentage. (2) It is no dishonour to a young man to believe in the religion of his fathers. It is always a hopeful and promising sign of a young man's character that, without absolutely pinning himself down to the faith of his fathers, he treats that faith with the profoundest respect, and will not easily be persuaded to surrender it.

III. What was the practical outcome of Josiah's piety? His whole life was spent in setting things right throughout his kingdom. All his energy was devoted to promoting the happiness of his people and the glory of God.

J. Thain Davidson, Talks with Young Men, p. 203.

Verse 14

2 Chronicles 34:14 , 2 Chronicles 34:20-21

Consider what we should lose if we were to part with the Christian Scriptures and with all the institutions and blessings for which we are indebted to them.

I. In the loss of the Bible and its fruits, we should lose the knowledge of the true God. History proves this beyond reasonable dispute. God must speak, or man does not find Him. Mankind needs a book to keep alive in the earth the knowledge of a spiritual and personal God.

II. By the loss of the Scriptures and their results from the knowledge of mankind, we should lose sooner or later our institutions of benevolence. Benevolence on any large scale, and in the form of permanent institutions, and for all classes of mankind is a Biblical idea.

III. In the loss of the Bible and its fruits, we should sooner or later suffer the loss of our institutions for popular education. Culture has existed without a revelation from heaven. Schools are not the product of the Bible only. But it is beyond question that popular education is of Bible origin. Other than Christian religions build themselves on the ignorance of the masses.

IV. By the loss of the Scriptures and their creations, we should sooner or later part with our institutions of civil liberty. History shows that the great charter of freedom in the world is the word of God. The great free nations of the earth are the great Christian nations.

A. Phelps, The Old Testament a Living Book, p. 187.

References: 2 Chronicles 34:14-33 . Homiletic Magazine, vol. xiii., p. 295. 2 Chronicles 34:27 . I. Williams, Characters of the Old Testament, p. 244; Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xiii., No. 748. 2 Chronicles 35:2 . Ibid., vol. xxvi., No. 1513. 2 Chronicles 36:1-23 . Clergyman's Magazine, vol. v., p. 94. 2 Chronicles 36:12 . Preacher's Monthly, vol. ii., p. 265.

Verses 20-21

2 Chronicles 34:14 , 2 Chronicles 34:20-21

Consider what we should lose if we were to part with the Christian Scriptures and with all the institutions and blessings for which we are indebted to them.

I. In the loss of the Bible and its fruits, we should lose the knowledge of the true God. History proves this beyond reasonable dispute. God must speak, or man does not find Him. Mankind needs a book to keep alive in the earth the knowledge of a spiritual and personal God.

II. By the loss of the Scriptures and their results from the knowledge of mankind, we should lose sooner or later our institutions of benevolence. Benevolence on any large scale, and in the form of permanent institutions, and for all classes of mankind is a Biblical idea.

III. In the loss of the Bible and its fruits, we should sooner or later suffer the loss of our institutions for popular education. Culture has existed without a revelation from heaven. Schools are not the product of the Bible only. But it is beyond question that popular education is of Bible origin. Other than Christian religions build themselves on the ignorance of the masses.

IV. By the loss of the Scriptures and their creations, we should sooner or later part with our institutions of civil liberty. History shows that the great charter of freedom in the world is the word of God. The great free nations of the earth are the great Christian nations.

A. Phelps, The Old Testament a Living Book, p. 187.

References: 2 Chronicles 34:14-33 . Homiletic Magazine, vol. xiii., p. 295. 2 Chronicles 34:27 . I. Williams, Characters of the Old Testament, p. 244; Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xiii., No. 748. 2 Chronicles 35:2 . Ibid., vol. xxvi., No. 1513. 2 Chronicles 36:1-23 . Clergyman's Magazine, vol. v., p. 94. 2 Chronicles 36:12 . Preacher's Monthly, vol. ii., p. 265.

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Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 2 Chronicles 34". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/sbc/2-chronicles-34.html.