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Bible Commentaries

Arno Gaebelein's Annotated Bible
Jeremiah 25

 

 

Verses 1-38

CHAPTER 25

The Seventy Years’ Captivity and the Judgment of the Nations

1. The retrospect (Jeremiah 25:1-7)

2. The seventy years’ captivity announced (Jeremiah 25:8-11)

3. The punishment of Babylon and its king (Jeremiah 25:12-14)

4. The wine-cup of fury for the nations (Jeremiah 25:15-29)

5. The day of the LORD and wrath of God (Jeremiah 25:30-38)

Jeremiah 25:1-7. The prophet in the fourth year of Jehoiakim addresses the people of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem. The fourth year of Jehoiakim was also the first year of Nebuchadrezzar. In this eventful year the battle of Carchemish was fought and Nebuchadrezzar defeated Egypt. The supremacy of Babylon had been insured. At this critical time the prophet gives a retrospect of his ministry among them. From the thirteenth year of Josiah he had spoken to them, but they had not heard. The Lord sent other servants, too, but they did not hear. He puts before them their stubbornness and how they provoked the Lord to anger.

Jeremiah 25:8-11. And now the solemn verdict is announced. The northern power is coming against this land, headed by King Nebuchadrezzar, who is here called for the first time by the Lord, “My servant.” All mirth and joy will be taken from them; the whole land shall be a desolation, and they shall serve the king of Babylon for seventy years.

Jeremiah 25:12-14. When the seventy years are ended the Babylonian nation and its king (Belshazar) would be punished for their iniquity. All that is written in this book of Jeremiah, concerning Babylon is to be accomplished (including the final desolation). Daniel in Babylon, when he read the book of Jeremiah, dwelt perhaps on this passage, and turned to the Lord in that remarkable prayer recorded in the ninth chapter of the book which bears his name.

Jeremiah 25:15-29. While the Lord thus judged Jerusalem, should the other nations go unpunished? And He answers, “Ye shall not be unpunished, for I will call for a sword upon all the inhabitants of the earth, saith the LORD of hosts” (Jeremiah 25:29). This prophecy is most remarkable. It predicts a world war. All nations shall drink and be moved and be mad because of the sword. It includes all the kingdoms of the world which are upon the face of the earth (Jeremiah 25:26). Have we not seen something like this during the past, most horrible war of history? And may this not be the prelude to the day of the Lord, when these nations will have to face the judge and judgment?

Jeremiah 25:30-38. The Yom Jehovah, the day of the LORD, is now announced by the prophet. It is that great future day ushered in by the visible and glorious manifestation of the Lord. All the prophets speak of that day as the day of consummation and glory. It is equally prominent in the New Testament Matthew 24:30; 2 Thessalonians 1:7-12; 2 Peter 3:7-18; Revelation 19:11-21, etc. Jeremiah beholds Him coming from above, with a shout, not the shout with which He calls His own together 1 Thessalonians 4:17, but the shout of judging wrath. He will plead with all flesh. The slain of the Lord shall be many. The howling of the shepherds, the false leaders, because their end is come, concludes this great vision.

 


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Bibliography Information
Gaebelein, Arno Clemens. "Commentary on Jeremiah 25:4". "Gaebelein's Annotated Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gab/jeremiah-25.html. 1913-1922.

Lectionary Calendar
Saturday, October 19th, 2019
the Week of Proper 23 / Ordinary 28
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