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Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures
Song of Solomon 7

 

 

Verses 1-4

The Intimacy of the Marriage Bed - In Song of Solomon 7:1-13 we have a description of the husband and wife coming together in the intimacy of the marriage bed. The man is first aroused by her physical beauty and uses his words in foreplay ( Song of Solomon 7:1-5). He then moves into the act of intercourse ( Song of Solomon 7:6-9). The wife responds with words expressing her desire to always yield to him as long as he continues his devotion to her ( Song of Solomon 7:10 to Song of Solomon 8:4). The context of this passage suggests that a healthy sex life builds a bond between a couple that keeps them intimate and not wandering away.

Outline - Here is a proposed outline:

1. The Man's Foreplay — Song of Solomon 7:1-5

2. The Act of Intercourse — Song of Solomon 7:6-9

3. The Woman's Response to His Devotion — Song of Solomon 7:10 to Song of Solomon 8:4


Verses 1-5

The Man's Foreplay: The King Describes Her Beauty - Literal Interpretation- In Song of Solomon 7:1-5 the king describes the beauty of the Shulamite woman. He begins with her feet, moves up her thighs, past her breasts, admiring her neck, and to her eyes, nose and finally her hair. Thus, he moves from her feet to the top of her head in progressive order. This is because a man is aroused visually by the physical appearance of his wife, while the woman is aroused emotional by a man's devotion to her, as we will learn in the next passage ( Song of Solomon 7:10-13). My wife has told me how much she needs me to embrace her and hold her after the act of intercourse. This act does not end with the orgasm, but should be followed through with intimate embrace. For it is during this time that the wife feels her husband's commitment and devotion to her. While the act of physical love gives the husband pleasure, it is the resulting embrace that gives the wife her pleasure.

Figurative Interpretation - Bickle suggests the description of the queen's beauty moving from feet to head suggest an emphasis upon outward actions. 232]

232] Mike Bickle, Session 17 - Vindication of the Persecuted Bride ( Song of Solomon 6:11-7:9), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 16.

Song of Solomon 7:1 How beautiful are thy feet with shoes, O prince"s daughter! the joints of thy thighs are fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners.

Song of Solomon 7:1Figurative Interpretation- "How beautiful are thy feet with shoes, O prince"s daughter!" - In Ephesians 6:15 the phrase "And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace" means that a mature servant of God is ready to walk out and obey the gospel of peace towards every man. He is no longer a person of strife and division, but of submission and unity. The emphasis here is on the walking out of the Gospel with one's fellow man rather than the proclamation of the Gospel. It is the walk more than the talk. It emphasizes the brethren endeavoring to keep the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace, which is accomplished by submitting to one another in the fear of the Lord. The phrase "prince's daughter" may suggest that a believer is a child of the King, a holy saint as God's child.

"the joints of thy thighs are fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners" - Jacob's thigh was thrust out of joint by the angel in Genesis 32:35 so that his own physical strength failed him. At this point in his life, Jacob fully depended upon the Lord. The thighs in Song of Solomon 7:1 may symbolize a person's divine strength and authority that he walks in as he labours for the Lord.

Genesis 32:25, "And when he saw that he prevailed not against him, he touched the hollow of his thigh; and the hollow of Jacob"s thigh was out of joint, as he wrestled with him."

Song of Solomon 7:2 Thy navel is like a round goblet, which wanteth not liquor: thy belly is like an heap of wheat set about with lilies.

Song of Solomon 7:2Word Study on "lilies" - Strong says the Hebrew word "lily" "shuwshan" ( שׁוּשַׁן) (H 7799) means, "a lily (from its whiteness), as a flower or [archaic] an ornament." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 15 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "lily 13, Shoshannim 2." However, its compound uses in Psalm 60 (Shushan-eduth) and Psalm 80 (Shoshannim-Eduth) can be included. It is found 8 times in Songs ( Song of Solomon 2:1-2; Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 4:5; Song of Solomon 5:13; Song of Solomon 6:2-3; Song of Solomon 7:2). Lilies were used to adorn Solomon's Temple ( 1 Kings 7:19; 1 Kings 7:22; 1 Kings 7:26, 2 Chronicles 4:5). This word or its derivatives are used in the title of four psalms as "Shoshannim" ( Psalm 45, 60, 69, 80). Psalm 45 is a song of love, where a wedding processional is described. In Songs the Beloved is describes as "a lily of the valley," and "a lily among thorns" ( Song of Solomon 2:1-2). The Lover feeds among the lilies in the garden ( Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 4:5; Song of Solomon 6:3), and gathers lilies ( Song of Solomon 5:13). Hosea describes the children of Israel as a lily, saying, "I will be as the dew unto Israel: he shall grow as the lily, and cast forth his roots as Lebanon." ( Hosea 14:5) Watchman Nee suggests that the lilies in Songs is symbolic of those who are upright before God. 233]

233] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 53.

Song of Solomon 7:2Figurative Interpretation - Watchman Nee suggests that reference to liquor (wine) and wheat (bread) symbolize the fact that this servant of God has become one with Jesus Christ in His purpose and passion by partaking of His sufferings. 234]

234] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 131.

2 Corinthians 1:5, "For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also aboundeth by Christ."

1 Peter 4:13, "But rejoice, inasmuch as ye are partakers of Christ"s sufferings; that, when his glory shall be revealed, ye may be glad also with exceeding joy."

Song of Solomon 7:3 Thy two breasts are like two young roes that are twins.

Song of Solomon 7:3Literal Interpretation- The young roes have skin that is a tan brown and soft to the touch when stroked. The deer's features are curved with the shape of its muscles. Thus, the king likens the breasts of his beloved to the shape and feel of a young deer. We can imagine oriental women with the beautiful skin of golden complexion, a color similar to the soft, velvet, golden color of the hair of the young fawns.

Figurative Interpretation - Song of Solomon 7:3 may suggest the maturity of the servant of God.

Song of Solomon 7:4 Thy neck is as a tower of ivory; thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, by the gate of Bathrabbim: thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus.

Song of Solomon 7:4 — "thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, by the gate of Bathrabbim" - Comments- Bickle tells us that the pools of Heshbon were extremely clear. 235] Heshbon was formerly the royal city of the Ammonite King Sihon.

235] Mike Bickle, Session 17 - Vindication of the Persecuted Bride ( Song of Solomon 6:11-7:9), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 23.

Numbers 21:25-26, "And Israel took all these cities: and Israel dwelt in all the cities of the Amorites, in Heshbon, and in all the villages thereof. For Heshbon was the city of Sihon the king of the Amorites, who had fought against the former king of Moab, and taken all his land out of his hand, even unto Arnon."

"thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus" - Comments - David built military outposts in Syria ( 2 Samuel 8:6), probably set on top of the mountain range of Lebanon. Solomon may have expanded this work building beautiful towers.

2 Samuel 8:6, "Then David put garrisons in Syria of Damascus: and the Syrians became servants to David, and brought gifts. And the LORD preserved David whithersoever he went."

The tower of Lebanon must have been a beautifully constructed tower, with long curves and interesting proportions in shape and design. In a similar way, the Shunammite's nose must have had similar curves and proportions that accented a beautiful face. As the tower of Lebanon accented the landscape, so did her nose accent her face.

Song of Solomon 7:4Figurative Interpretation - The neck could symbolize strength of character. The eyes may suggest the purity of one's heart and mind. The nose may suggest one's spiritual acuteness.

Song of Solomon 7:5 Thine head upon thee is like Carmel, and the hair of thine head like purple; the king is held in the galleries.

Song of Solomon 7:5Word Study on "the galleries" - Gesenius says the Hebrew word "galleries" "rahat" ( רַהַט) (H 7298) literally means, "a watering trough" ( Genesis 30:38; Genesis 30:41, Exodus 2:16). He gives us its figurative meaning as "ringlets, curls (apparently so called from their flowing down)" ( Song of Solomon 7:5). Strong says it means, "a channel or water box, by resemblance a ringlet of hair (as forming parallel lines)." Strong says it probably comes from an unused root means, "to hollow out." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 4times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "gutter 2, trough 1, gallery 1."

Genesis 30:38, "And he set the rods which he had pilled before the flocks in the gutters in the watering troughs when the flocks came to drink, that they should conceive when they came to drink."

Genesis 30:41, "And it came to pass, whensoever the stronger cattle did conceive, that Jacob laid the rods before the eyes of the cattle in the gutters, that they might conceive among the rods."

Exodus 2:16, "Now the priest of Midian had seven daughters: and they came and drew water, and filled the troughs to water their father"s flock."

Song of Solomon 7:5, "Thine head upon thee is like Carmel, and the hair of thine head like purple; the king is held in the galleries."

Song of Solomon 7:5Literal Interpretation- The context of this verse in Song of Solomon 7:5 suggests that the beautiful head and hair and flowing locks of his beloved hold him captivated so that he cannot turn his eyes away.

Figurative Interpretation - "Thine head upon thee is like Carmel" - As mount Carmel has a white cap, perhaps this metaphor suggests a servant of God who walks in the wisdom of God as do aged men with white hair ( Proverbs 20:29). "and the hair of thine head like purple" - The color purple is symbolic of royalty. Perhaps this person is characterized as one who walks with divine authority, as did Elijah on mount Carmel. "the king is held in the galleries" - Bickle interprets Song of Solomon 7:5 to refer to those men and women of God who have held the Lord captive by their lives of sacrifice and devotion to Him. 236] It may suggest that the prayers of these saints move God to immediate action.

236] Mike Bickle, Session 17 - Vindication of the Persecuted Bride ( Song of Solomon 6:11-7:9), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 25-6.

Proverbs 20:29, "The glory of young men is their strength: and the beauty of old men is the gray head."


Verses 6-9

The Act of Intercourse - Literal Interpretation- Many Christian scholars interpret Song of Solomon 7:6-9 as a description of the act of intercourse between a man and a woman. In Song of Solomon 7:6 the husband makes his request for intercourse with his wife in the expression, "O love, for delights". The act of intercourse between a man and a woman is not solely for procreation, but is also intended to give delight in the marriage. In Song of Solomon 7:7 he likens her feminine shape to the palm tree. We can picture the palm tree in the Middle East as it grows so beautifully along well-watered areas. It has a long, tall trunk with no limbs. At the top is a group of long, curved palm branches giving the tree its unique shape. Just under its leaves are clusters of dates, or coconuts, which give the tree its character and identity.

Song of Solomon 7:8 then describes the act of climbing these palm trees. This is because they were harvested by them and taking hold of their branches in order to cut off their clusters. As a young teenager my two brothers and I once climbed a pine tree in our yard. It had a long vine running down from its branches, which we held on to in order to climb. For the lowest branches of the pine tree are twenty feet off of the ground. Thus, we had to climb with our legs wrapped tightly around the trunk of the tree, much like these harvesters of the date palms. Although we were youth, as we climbed with our legs squeezing tightly around the trunk of the tree, my brothers and I would feel an orgasm coming. The higher we climbed the strong the urge. We did not understand what was happening. Song of Solomon , we simply stopped and squeezed ourselves against the tree trunk until the urge subsided and we came down. If we had continued to climb up to the lower branches we surely would have had a full orgasm. This is what such harvesters would have experienced while harvesting their dates or coconuts. Taking hold of the boughs would represent the orgasm.

Finally, in Song of Solomon 7:9 he expresses his delight in kissing her lovely face during intercourse by referring to her mouth and lips.

How can the Lover speak this way to the Shulamite woman? It is simply because they have now been wed and he is speaking to his wife; for we find that the marriage ceremony has taken place ( Song of Solomon 3:6-11) and the marriage bed has been consummated ( Song of Solomon 4:16 to Song of Solomon 5:1). Thus, they are now husband and wife.

Figurative Interpretation - Bickle believes Song of Solomon 7:6-9 symbolizes the Lord releasing a greater measure of the anointing in a mature believer's life. 237]

237] Mike Bickle, Session 17 - Vindication of the Persecuted Bride ( Song of Solomon 6:11-7:9), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 2, 16.

Song of Solomon 7:6 How fair and how pleasant art thou, O love, for delights!

Song of Solomon 7:6Word Study on "love" - Strong says the Hebrew word "love" "ahabah" ( אַהֲבָה) (H 160), means, "love." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used forty (40) times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "love 40." It is found 11times in the Song of Solomon ( Song of Solomon 2:4-5; Song of Solomon 2:7; Song of Solomon 3:5; Song of Solomon 3:10; Song of Solomon 5:8; Song of Solomon 7:6; Song of Solomon 8:4; Song of Solomon 8:6-7[twice]), with one of these uses as a substantive to refer to her lover ( Song of Solomon 7:6).

Comments- The word "O" was added by the translators and is not found in the original text.

Song of Solomon 7:6Literal Interpretation - The phrase "for delights" in Song of Solomon 7:6 suggests that the act of intercourse between a man and a woman is not solely for procreation, but is also intended to give delight in the marriage.

Figurative Interpretation - At this point in the believer's maturity God greatly delights in his devotion. Even in the midst of trials and tests the believer has proved to truly love God above all else.

Song of Solomon 7:7 This thy stature is like to a palm tree, and thy breasts to clusters of grapes.

Song of Solomon 7:7Word Study on "clusters of grapes" - Strong says the Hebrew word "clusters of grapes" "esh-kole"" ( אֶשְׁכֹּול) (H 811) means, "a bunch of grapes or other fruit." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 9 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "cluster 8, cluster of grapes 1." Thus, the Hebrew text does not have the word "of grapes." As a result most modern translations simply read "clusters." Many scholars understand these clusters to be those of the palm tree, which is mentioned as a parallel verse.

Song of Solomon 7:7Literal Interpretation - The husband expresses his strong attraction for the beautiful physique of his wife, her shapely stature, or figure, and breasts.

Figurative Interpretation - A palm tree flourishes, even in the desert. The Lord expresses his delight in the maturity of the believer in the midst of the desert and wilderness of this world. He has been steadfast and grown to maturity so as to produce fruit for the Kingdom of Heaven. He is able to nurture others in the faith.

Song of Solomon 7:8 I said, I will go up to the palm tree, I will take hold of the boughs thereof: now also thy breasts shall be as clusters of the vine, and the smell of thy nose like apples;

Song of Solomon 7:8Word Study on "apples" - Strong says the Hebrew word "apple tree" "tappuwach" ( תַּפּוּחַ) (H 8598) word means, "an apple, apple tree." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 6 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "apple tree 3, apple." (see Proverbs 25:11, Song of Solomon 2:3; Song of Solomon 2:5; Song of Solomon 7:8; Song of Solomon 8:5, Joel 1:12). Thomas Constable says, "The apple tree was a symbol of love in ancient poetry because of its beauty, fragrance and sweet fruit." 238]

238] Thomas L. Constable, Notes on Song of Solomon (Garland, Texas: Sonic Light, 2000) [on-line]; accessed 28 December 2008; available from http://www.soniclight.com/constable/notes.htm; Internet, 26.

Song of Solomon 7:8Comments- There have been many allegorical interpretations as to the two breasts referred to in Song of Solomon 4:5 and Song of Solomon 7:8. Dennis Kinlaw says, "Jewish scholars have seen in the bride"s breasts Moses and Aaron; the two Messiahs, Messiah Son of David and Messiah son of Ephraim; Moses and Phinehas; and Joshua and Eleazar. Christian interpreters have been equally ingenious. They have seen the bride"s breasts as the church from which we feed; the two testaments, Old and New; the twin precepts of love of God and neighbor; and the Blood and the Water. Gregory of Nyssa found in them the outer and the inner Prayer of Manasseh , united in one sentient being. Little wonder that the allegorical interpretation has come under increasing attack in the last two centuries. It is not difficult to understand Luther when he insisted that the literal sense." 239]

239] Dennis F. Kinlaw, "Introduction," in Song of Solomon , in The Expositor's Bible Commentary, vol 5, ed. Frank E. Gaebelien, J. D. Douglas, and Dick Polcyn (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Pub. House, 1976-1992), in Zondervan Reference Software, v 28 [CD-ROM] (Grand Rapids, Michigan: The Zondervan Corp, 1989-2001).

Song of Solomon 7:8Literal Interpretation - Song of Solomon 7:8 describes the act of climbing these palm trees. Reaching the top and taking hold of the boughs would represent the man's orgasm.

Figurative Interpretation - "I said, I will go up to the palm tree, I will take hold of the boughs thereof" - Perhaps this statement means that the Lord will release His anointing through this servant of God. "and the smell of thy nose like apples" - Watchman Nee suggests this phrase to mean that this believer expresses the fragrance of Christ. 240]

240] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 136.

Song of Solomon 7:9 And the roof of thy mouth like the best wine for my beloved, that goeth down sweetly, causing the lips of those that are asleep to speak.

Song of Solomon 7:9Literal Interpretation- In Song of Solomon 7:9 he expresses his delight in kissing her lovely face during intercourse by referring to her mouth and lips. It implies him placing his tongue into her mouth and tasting the roof of her mouth in deep kissing.

Figurative Interpretation - "And the roof of thy mouth like the best wine for my beloved" - If the wine is figurative of the Holy Spirit, then this servant of God is allowing the Holy Spirit to move through him and bring to life those who are "asleep", or inattentive to the things of God. Watchman Nee suggests this refers to a believer's desire for the new wine of the new millennium at the resurrection of the saints ( Matthew 26:29). 241]

241] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 136.

Matthew 26:29, "But I say unto you, I will not drink henceforth of this fruit of the vine, until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father"s kingdom."


Verse 10

The Woman's Response to His Devotion - Song of Solomon 7:10-13 tells us the woman's response to her husband's affections. A man is aroused visually by the physical appearance of his wife, while the woman is aroused emotionally by a man's devotion to her, as we will learn in the next passage ( Song of Solomon 7:10-13). My wife has told me how much she needs me to embrace her and hold her after the act of intercourse. This time of intimacy does not end with the orgasm, but should be followed through with close embrace: for it is during this time that the wife feels her husband's commitment and devotion to her. While the act of physical love gives the husband pleasure, it is the resulting embrace that gives the wife her pleasure and contentment.

In Song of Solomon 7:10 to Song of Solomon 8:4 we do not have the wife desirous of the physical features of her husband, but rather, expressing the emotions of continual embraces. The woman uses the language of flourishing vines and the smell of the mandrakes symbolically to express the emotions that she feels towards her husband as a result of these times of intimacy with her.

Outline - Here is a proposed outline:

1. Special Times Together — Song of Solomon 7:10-13

2. The Beloved's Struggle for Undivided Attention — Song of Solomon 8:1-4


Verses 10-13

Special Times Together - Song of Solomon 7:10-13 suggests that the wife's love for her husband has been deepened by his intimacy towards her. She becomes convinced of his devotion ( Song of Solomon 7:10) and asks for more special times together ( Song of Solomon 7:11-12). A couple must have special times together away from the busy schedules of life. During these times she will experience emotional bonding with her husband, which is symbolized by the smell and partaking of delicious fruits ( Song of Solomon 7:13).

Song of Solomon 7:10 I am my beloved"s, and his desire is toward me.

Song of Solomon 7:10Figurative Interpretation - This servant of God has now proven his love and devotion towards God. Although God loves all of mankind, this child of God has captured His heart so that the Lord watches over him with intense jealously. This servant wholly desires the Lord above the things of this world, and the Lord has a passion for this special servant.

Song of Solomon 7:11 Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field; let us lodge in the villages.

Song of Solomon 7:11Figurative Interpretation- Figuratively speaking, Song of Solomon 7:11 may be interpreted as someone who has been filled with a passion for redemption of mankind. This passion was imparted by Holy Spirit, and is a deep work of God in a believer's life. This servant of God joins the Lord in the harvest field of redeeming souls. Reinhard Bonnke once said that if he did not preach the Gospel he would burst. 242]

242] Reinhard Bonnke, interviewed by Benny Hinn, This is Your Day (Irving, Texas), on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California), television program.

Song of Solomon 7:12 Let us get up early to the vineyards; let us see if the vine flourish, whether the tender grape appear, and the pomegranates bud forth: there will I give thee my loves.

Song of Solomon 7:12Word Study on "vineyards" - Strong says the Hebrew word "vineyard" "korem" ( כָּרַם) (H 3754) means, "a garden, a vineyard." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 93times in the Old Testament, being used in the KJV as "vineyard 89, vines 3, vintage 1." This word is used 9 times in the book of Songs. A vineyard figuratively refers to the labours that man does while serving the Lord in this life.

Comments- The Song of Songs refers to a garden nine times ( Song of Solomon 4:12; Song of Solomon 4:15-16; Song of Solomon 5:1; Song of Solomon 6:2; Song of Solomon 6:11; Song of Solomon 8:13) and to a vineyard nine times ( Song of Solomon 1:6; Song of Solomon 1:14; Song of Solomon 2:15; Song of Solomon 7:12; Song of Solomon 8:11-12) within its text. A garden is a place of meditation and rest, while a vineyard is a place of bearing fruit as a result of entering into rest and communion with God. For our life of walking in the Spirit and bearing fruit is simply the overflow of being filled with the Spirit while in communion with the Lord. The beloved's vineyard would figuratively represent a believer who has entered into his calling and ministry and is labouring for the Lord.

Song of Solomon 7:12Word Study on "the pomegranates" - Strong says the Hebrew word "pomegranate" "rimmôwn" ( רִמּוֹן) (H 7416) means "a pomegranate, the tree or the fruit," and it also refers to the pomegranate ornament used in the Tabernacle and Temple. The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 32times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "pomegranate 31, pomegranate tree 1." It is used times in the book of Songs ( Song of Solomon 4:3; Song of Solomon 4:13; Song of Solomon 6:7; Song of Solomon 6:11; Song of Solomon 7:12; Song of Solomon 8:2).

Comments- The pomegranate tree was one of the most attractive fruit trees in the Middle East, with brilliant scarlet blossom in the spring ( Song of Solomon 7:12). The Israelites planted the tree in orchards ( Song of Solomon 4:13; Song of Solomon 6:11; Song of Solomon 7:12) and made wine from its juice ( Song of Solomon 8:2) The beautiful texture of its inner fruit may have been behind the metaphorical phrase, "thy temples are like a piece of a pomegranate within thy locks" ( Song of Solomon 4:3; Song of Solomon 6:7). 243]

243] E. W. G. Masterman, "Pomegranate," in International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, ed. James Orr (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, c 1915, 1939), in The Sword Project, v 1511 [CD-ROM] (Temple, AZ: CrossWire Bible Society, 1990-2008).

Song of Solomon 7:12 — "there will I give thee my loves" - Comments- In Song of Solomon 7:12 the wife responds to the affection of her husband by saying "there will I give thee my loves". In other words, she is asking for his continual affection from her husband. This statement tells us that the act of making love in the marriage bed is designed to be repetitive as a means of establishing love and trust between a husband and a wife. When sex is left out of marriage because of the negative attitude of a spouse towards the other, the struggles of a marriage relationship have no chance of being healed. But times of intimacy in the marriage bed is God's plan of bringing continual restoration and the building of strong bonds of love between two people; for no marriage is without such struggles.

Song of Solomon 7:12Figurative Interpretation - The child of God who has been empowered with a divine love for redeeming mankind wants to work in the vineyards and see a harvest. This is the place where a servant wants to express his love towards God by producing fruit in the vineyard.

Song of Solomon 7:13 The mandrakes give a smell, and at our gates are all manner of pleasant fruits, new and old, which I have laid up for thee, O my beloved.

Song of Solomon 7:13Word Study on "mandrakes" - Gesenius says the Hebrew word "mandrakes" "duwday" ( דּוּדָאִים) and ( דּוּדַי) (H 1736) means, "boiling, cooking, hence, a cooking pot." He says it also means, "loving, amatory," and in the plural it means, "love apples." Strong says it means, "a boiler, a basket," also, "the mandrake (as an aphrodisiac)." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 7 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "mandrakes 6, basket 1." Note the other uses of this Hebrew word in the Scriptures.

Genesis 30:14, "And Reuben went in the days of wheat harvest, and found mandrakes in the field, and brought them unto his mother Leah. Then Rachel said to Leah, Give me, I pray thee, of thy son"s mandrakes."

Genesis 30:15, "And she said unto her, Is it a small matter that thou hast taken my husband? and wouldest thou take away my son"s mandrakes also? And Rachel said, Therefore he shall lie with thee to night for thy son"s mandrakes."

Genesis 30:16, "And Jacob came out of the field in the evening, and Leah went out to meet him, and said, Thou must come in unto me; for surely I have hired thee with my son"s mandrakes. And he lay with her that night."

Jeremiah 24:1, "The LORD shewed me, and, behold, two baskets of figs were set before the temple of the LORD, after that Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon had carried away captive Jeconiah the son of Jehoiakim king of Judah, and the princes of Judah, with the carpenters and smiths, from Jerusalem, and had brought them to Babylon."

We recognize a similar Hebrew word ( דֹּוד) (H 1730), which is used 31times in the book of Songs to means, "beloved," and is used in this same verse. Such similar words are often used in Hebrew poetry as a play on words.

Song of Solomon 7:13 — "The mandrakes give a smell" - Comments- Gesenius and Smith tell us that the mandrakes referred to in the Scriptures were the apples of the Mandragora (Atropa Mandragora). Smith says it was a plant that is "closely allied to the well-known deadly nightshade, Atropa bellndonna, and to the tomato, and belongs to the order Solanaceae, or potato family." Gesenius says it is a herb resembling the Belladonna, with a root like a carrot, having white and reddish blossoms of a sweet smell ( Song of Solomon 7:14), and with yellow odoriferous apples that commonly are ripe from May to July." Smith says "it grows low, like lettuce, which its leaves somewhat resemble, except that they are of a dark green." Its fruit, when ripe, (early May), is about the size of a small apple, 24inches in diameter, ruddy or yellow, and of a most agreeable odor, (to Orientals more than to Europeans), and an equally agreeable taste." Gesenius and ISBE call it "love-apple." Smith says the Arabs call it "Satan"s apple," from its power to excite voluptuousness." The ISBE tells us that these mandrakes were "the fruit of the Mandragora officinarum, a member of the Solanaceae or potato order, closely allied to the Atropa belladonna," which was a common plant found in Palestine and "known as an aphrodisiac by the ancients." 244]

244] E. W. G. Masterman, "Mandrake," in International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, ed. James Orr (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, c 1915, 1939), in The Sword Project, v 1511 [CD-ROM] (Temple, AZ: CrossWire Bible Society, 1990-2008).

Song of Solomon 7:13Figurative Interpretation - The servant of God describes the abundant harvest that is taking place in the vineyards of the Lord as he loving serves the Lord.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are copyrighted by the author, Gary Everett. Used by Permission.
No distribution beyond personal use without permission.

Bibliography Information
Everett, Gary H. "Commentary on Song of Solomon 7:4". Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghe/song-of-solomon-7.html. 2013.

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Tuesday, October 22nd, 2019
the Week of Proper 24 / Ordinary 29
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