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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Corinthians 10:22

Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? We are not stronger than He, are we?

Adam Clarke Commentary

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? - All idolatry is represented as a sort of spiritual adultery; it is giving that heart to Satan that should be devoted to God; and he is represented as being jealous, because of the infidelity of those who have covenanted to give their hearts to him.

Are we stronger than he? - As he has threatened to punish such transgressors, and will infallibly do it, can we resist his omnipotence? A sinner should consider, while he is in rebellion against God, whether he be able to resist that power whereby God will inflict vengeance.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? - That is, shall we, by joining in the worship of idols, “provoke” or “irritate” God, or excite him to anger? This is evidently the meaning of the word παραζηλοῦμεν parazēloumenrendered “provoke to jealousy.” The word קנא qaana'usually rendered by this word by the Septuagint, has this sense in Deuteronomy 32:21; 1 Kings 14:22; Ezra 8:3; Psalm 78:58. There is a reference here, doubtless, to the truth recorded in Exodus 20:5. that God “is a jealous God,” and that he regards the worship of idols as a direct affront to himself. The sentiment of Paul is, that to join in the worship of idols, or in the observance of their feasts, would be to participate in that which had ever been regarded by God with special abhorrence, and which more than anything else tended to provoke his wrath. We may observe, that any course of life that tends to alienate the affections from God, and to fix them on other beings or objects, is a sin of the same kind as that referred to here. Any inordinate love of friends, of property, of honor, has substantially the same idolatrous nature, and will tend to provoke him to anger. And it may be asked of Christians now, whether they will by such inordinate attachments provoke the Lord to wrath? whether they will thus excite his displeasure, and expose themselves to his indignation? Very often Christians do thus provoke him. They become unduly attached to a friend, or to wealth, and God in anger takes away that friend by death, or that property by the flames, or they conform to the world, and mingle in its scenes of fashion and gaiety, and forget God; and in displeasure he visits them with judgments, humbles them, and recalls them to Himself.

Are we stronger than he? - This is given as a reason why we should not provoke his displeasure. We cannot contend successfully with Him; and it is therefore madness and folly to contend with God, or to expose ourselves to the effects of His indignation.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-corinthians-10.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

Even in the Old Testament, idol worship was spoken of as provoking the Lord to jealousy; and, as Macknight said, "This is an allusion to Exodus 20:5, where, after prohibiting the worshipping of images, God adds, "I the Lord thy God, am a jealous God!"[32]

Are we stronger than he? ... This carries the thought, "Do you really wish to be an enemy of God?" Jesus gave a parable of one who contemplated going to war with one stronger than himself in Luke 14:32. The thought there is particularly applicable here. See my Commentary on Luke, p. 319.

ENDNOTE:

[32] James Macknight, op. cit., p. 163.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/1-corinthians-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy?.... As they do who are guilty of idolatry in any shape: nothing is more highly resented by God, or stirs him up more to wrath and fury, and to inflict punishment; he cannot bear, nor will he admit of a rival in religious worship; he is a God jealous of his own honour; nor will he give, or suffer to be given by others, his praise and glory to graven images:

are we stronger than he? to give into idolatrous practices, is to proclaim and enter into a war against God; and what madness must this be? who can be so sottish and stupid as to think of succeeding? when God is omnipotent, and man a poor feeble impotent creature, a worm, and but dust and ashes: thus the apostle dissuades from idolatry, and every species and branch of it; partly from its ill effect, in bringing men into fellowship with devils; and partly from the impossibility of practising it, in consistence with a true and real participation of the cup and table of the Lord; and from the absurdity and stupidity of it, and its dangerous consequence, in exposing men to the vengeance of an almighty incensed Being.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-corinthians-10.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? — by dividing our fellowship between Him and idols (Ezekiel 20:39). Is it our wish to provoke Him to assert His power? Deuteronomy 32:21 is before the apostle‘s mind [Alford], (Exodus 20:5).

are we stronger? — that we can risk a contest with Him.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-corinthians-10.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Provoke to jealousy (παραζηλουμενparazēloumen). The very word used in Deuteronomy 32:21 of the insolence of the old Israelites. Quoted in Romans 10:19. Such double-dealing now will do this very thing.

Stronger than he (ισχυροτεροι αυτουischuroteroi autou). Comparative adjective followed by the ablative.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/1-corinthians-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Do we provoke - to jealousy ( ἢ παραζηλοῦμεν )

The A.V. does not translate ἢ orand thus breaks the connection with what precedes. You cannot be at the same time in communion with the Lord and with demons, or will you ignore this inconsistency and provoke God? For the verb, see on Romans 10:19.

Are we stronger

The force of the interrogative particle is, surely we are not stronger.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/1-corinthians-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy — By thus caressing his rivals? Are we stronger than he - Are we able to resist, or to bear his wrath?


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-corinthians-10.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Do we provoke? shall we provoke?


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/1-corinthians-10.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

22.Do we provoke the Lord ? Having laid down the doctrine, he assumes a more vehement tone, from observing, that what was a most atrocious offense against God was regarded as nothing, or, at least, was looked upon as a very trivial error. The Corinthians wished the liberty that they took to be reckoned excusable, as there is not one of us that willingly allows himself to be found fault with, but, on the contrary, we seek one subterfuge after another, under which to shelter ourselves. Now Paul says, and not without reason, that in this way we wage war against God; for nothing does God more require from us than this — that we adhere strictly to everything that he declares in his word. Do not those, then, who use subterfuges, (591) in order that they may be at liberty to transgress the commandment of God, arm themselves openly against God? Hence that curse which the Prophet denounces against all those who call evil, good, anddarkness, light (Isaiah 5:20.)

Are we stronger ? He warns them how dangerous a thing it is to provoke God — because no one can do this but to his own ruin. (592) Among men the chance of war, as they speak, is doubtful, but to contend with God is nothing short of voluntarily courting destruction. Accordingly, if we fear to have God as an enemy, let us shudder at the thought of framing excuses for manifest sins, that is, whatever stand opposed to his word. Let us, also, shudder at the thought of calling in question those things that he has himself pronounced upon — for this is nothing less than to rise up against heaven after the manner of the giants. (593) (Genesis 11:4.)


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/1-corinthians-10.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

22 Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

Ver. 22. Do we provoke the Lord] As Caligula that dared his Jove to a duel; as the raging Turk at the last assault of Scodra most horribly blaspheming God. But who knoweth the power of his anger? Psalms 90:11. It is such as none can avert or avoid, avoid or abide. To such therefore as will needs provoke the Lord, we may well say, as Ulysses’ companions said to him, when he would needs provoke Polydamas;

" σχετλιε τιπτ εθελεις ερεθιζεμεν αγριον ανδρα.

What mean’st thou, wretch, to enrage this cruel man?"


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Corinthians 10:22. Do we provoke the Lord, &c.?— This alludes to the idea under which idolatry is represented as a kind of spiritual adultery, which moved the jealousy of God; though every deliberate sin is, in effect, a daring of his omnipotent vengeance. See Doddridge and Locke.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. That the worship of God is that which he is very tender and jealous of: never was husband so jealous of the chastity of his suspected wife, as God is jealous in point of worship; idolatry is a provoking God to jealousy.

Observe, 2. That such as worship idols, or are guilty of idolatrous worship in any kind or degree, must expect God a jealous revenger, and will find themselves not strong enough to contend with him. "Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy, by joining devils in competition with him? Are we stronger than he? Who knows the power of his anger? The strength of God should make sinners tremble."


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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

22.] Or are we provoking (is it our wish to provoke, that He may assert His power) the Lord (Christ) to jealousy (by dividing our participation between Him and devils)?—see ref. Deut., which evidently is before the Apostle’s mind:—are we stronger than He (are we then such, that we can afford to defy His power to punish)?


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/1-corinthians-10.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

1 Corinthians 10:22. Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? to prove that He will not suffer us to set Him on the same level with the demons? The connection is this: “You cannot, etc., 1 Corinthians 10:21, unless it were the case that we Christians were people whose business it is to provoke Christ to jealousy.” Hence the indicative, which should not be taken as deliberative, with Luther and others, including Pott, Flatt, and Rückert (or would we defy the Lord?), but: we occupy ourselves therewith, are engaged therein. Comp Bernhardy, Syntax, p. 370. The phrase, τὸν κύριον, however, should not be referred to God on the ground of the allusion undoubtedly made here to Deuteronomy 32:21 (so commonly, as by Ewald, Pott, Billroth, Rückert, Olshausen), but (as by de Wette and Hofmann), on account of 1 Corinthians 10:21, to Christ.

μὴ ἰσχυρ. κ. τ. λ(1695)] we are not surely stronger than He? i.e. we are not surely persons, whom His strength, which He would put forth against us to carry out the promptings of that jealousy,(1696) cannot get the better of? Comp Job 37:23. Chrysostom already correctly notes the abductio ad absurdum, with which Paul winds up this part of his polemic against the eating of sacrificial meat.


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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

1 Corinthians 10:22. παραζηλοῦμεν) do we provoke to jealousy? namely, by idolatry, 1 Corinthians 10:7; Exodus 20:5. The kindred word is הלאות, ἀγῶνα παρέχειν, to cause one a conflict, to weary out, Isaiah 7:13. So Deuteronomy 32:21,— αὐτοὶ παρεζήλωσάν με ἐπʼ οὐ θεῷ, they have moved me to jealousy with that which is no god.— ἰσχυρότεροι, stronger) so that we may flee from His jealousy when kindled? [The weaker party is provoked without danger; but it is different in the stronger.—V. g.]


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/1-corinthians-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Jealousy is a violent passion in a man, not bearing a companion or a rival as to a thing or person which he loveth. It is in holy writ applied unto God, not to signify any such extravagancy, excess, or vehemence, as attendeth that passion in men, but only his just displeasure at the giving that homage to any creature which is due to him alone. It is most applied to God to express his anger against those who give Divine homage to idols; the worship of God being a great piece of his glory which he hath said he will not give to another, nor his praise to graven images, Isaiah 42:8. Hence divines observe, that jealousy is attributed to God in the second commandment, which concerns the more external worship of God, to deter men from the violation of it, Exodus 20:5. So Exodus 34:14 Deuteronomy 4:24 5:9 6:16, and in many other texts, it signifieth, that the worship of God is a thing that he is very tender of, and that his will is to endure no creature to share with him in it; and that his wrath shall flame against that man that offers to make any creature such a sharer. So that it is not safe for any to do any thing of that nature, unless he could fancy himself to be stronger than God; for he that doth it, must expect the power and strength of God to be engaged against him. Thus the apostle had dissuaded them from eating meat sacrificed to idols in the idol’s temple, from the impiety of it, it being a species of idolatry, against which God hath signally revealed his wrath. He returns in the following verses to an argument, by which he had before dissuaded it, 1 Corinthians 8:1-13, as it was against charity, and the duty of love, in which they were indebted to their brethren.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Persons cannot continue to unite with the wicked in the service of Satan, and yet be the friends of God; and those who seek their chief enjoyment in sensual gratifications, are provoking the Lord to destroy them.


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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/1-corinthians-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

22. ἢ παραζηλοῦμεν τὸν κύριον; i.e. as the Jews had done to their cost. See note on last verse. Cf. also Numbers 14; Deuteronomy 32:21; Psalms 95:8; Hebrews 3:16. The same word is found, with the same translation, in Romans 10:19; Romans 11:11, and in 1 Corinthians 10:14 of that chapter it is translated provoke to emulation.

μὴ ἰσχυρότεροι αὐτοῦ ἐσμέν; Surely we are not stronger than He? After having thus hinted at a wrath to come, St Paul turns abruptly aside, after his manner, to introduce a new argument.


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"Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/1-corinthians-10.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22. Provoke the Lord—As we have above intimated, St. Paul has in mind Deuteronomy 32:17-26, and this is an allusion to 1 Corinthians 10:21.

Stronger than he—So as to meet all the threatenings of Deuteronomy 32:21-26.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-corinthians-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

'Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he?'

By not fleeing from idolatry they are provoking the Lord to jealously (the symmetry of the passage connects the two statements). He thus compares the act of eating in pagan temples with lovers seeking to make their partner jealous by consorting with another. Is that what they are trying to do, make God jealous? Do they really think that they are so mighty that they can treat God in that way?

Or perhaps in the light of Deuteronomy 32:17 he is simply pointing out that they are deliberately rebelling by approaching false gods even while they pretend to worship the true God, and thus stirring God's 'jealousy', His concern that His people should only look to Him (Exodus 20:5). For In Deuteronomy 32:17 we read, 'they sacrificed to demons which were no God, to gods whom they knew not, whom your fathers did not fear' and this is followed by (1 Corinthians 10:21), 'they have moved me to jealousy with that which is not God, they have provoked me to anger with their vanities, and I will move them to jealousy with those who are not a people, I will provoke them to anger with a foolish nation.'

These foolish Corinthians, he suggests, are behaving just like those foolish Israelites of old (compare 1 Corinthians 10:5-10) and may therefore bring on themselves the same judgment, that God will show favour to others who are not His chosen and not to them who think they are. They are thus choosing their own way in defiance of God and thereby giving the impression that they think themselves stronger than Him. While what they are really doing is flaunting God.


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/1-corinthians-10.html. 2013.

Joseph Beet's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

1 Corinthians 10:22. A third dissuasive, suggested by Deuteronomy 32:17 and Deuteronomy 32:21. Paul asks, “What is the practical significance and effect of our conduct? For, to countenance idolatry, is to rouse the anger of Christ, who claims to be our sole Master.” This solemn warning, 1 Corinthians 10:22 b supports by appealing to the greater strength of Him whom some were so carelessly provoking.

ARGUMENT. Paul wishes to dissuade from all contact with idolatry, and especially from attendance at idol-feasts. Even this might be thought allowable; since (1 Corinthians 8:4) idols have no real existence, and (Romans 14:14; Matthew 15:11) no food can of itself defile. But Paul reminds us that upon eating and drinking hang great spiritual consequences; that a simple Christian feast is a condition of receiving individually the results of Christ's death, and a means of maintaining the wonderful oneness of the church throughout the world, a result far from the thought of many who partake the feast. But a closer analogy is at hand.

They who partake the Mosaic feasts in the temple-court at Jerusalem are evidently, though most of them think nothing about it, supporting by their presence the Mosaic ritual and economy. Now, although idols have no existence, yet behind and beneath them is a real and superhuman and diabolical power. (Else, idolatry were harmless.) Therefore, as in the analogous case of the Jewish sacrificial feasts, all who join the idol-feasts lend by the presence aid to idolatry, and thus help demons to rule over men. Therefore, whatever pleasure comes from such feasts, since it is a result of sin, is a cup presented by evil spirits. From such a cup we may well draw back.

Again, Christ claims our sole allegiance, and will tolerate no rival. Therefore, to indulge in the pleasures offered by idolatry, is to forego the salvation which comes through the shed blood of Christ, which is solemnly set forth in the Christian feast and makes the sacramental cup to be a cup of praise to God. To attempt to mingle the pleasures of idolatry and the salvation of Christ, is but to attempt, in spite of God's warning to ancient Israel, to call forth the jealous and irresistible anger of our Master, Christ.

This section is the stronghold of the Lutheran doctrine of CONSUBSTANTIATION, viz. that all who partake the Lord s Supper thereby receive Christ, though it depends upon themselves whether they receive Him to bless or to condemn. See note under 1 Corinthians 11:34. The argument is, that he who attends an idol-feast is said to become thereby even without or against his intention, a partner with demons, and that therefore by analogy we must suppose that he who partakes the Lord's Supper becomes thereby, whatever be his state of heart, a sharer of the body and blood of Christ. But it is unsafe to build up an important doctrine not expressly taught in Scripture on its supposed necessity to give validity to one Scripture argument, an argument somewhat obscured by distance of time and total change of circumstances. Moreover, without assuming the Lutheran Doctrine, we have already felt the great force of Paul's argument. Nay more. The Lutheran doctrine is inconsistent with 1 Corinthians 10:21. For, since outward attendance at idol-feasts involves, even against our will, spiritual partnership with demons, if in like manner material eating of the Lord's Supper involved spiritual union with Christ, then it would be possible and easy to eat on the same day of the Lord's table and the table of demons: which Paul declares to be impossible. We therefore infer that he refers to a spiritual reception of the results of Christ's death which does not always accompany a reception of the bread and wine.

The argument of § 18 was doubtless suggested by the matter of § 21. The matters which come before him, Paul grasps so firmly that he instinctively makes various use of them: e.g. 1 Corinthians 9:13 f and 1 Corinthians 10:18.

This section teaches the solemn and far-reaching lesson that, if by our countenance we help forward anything of which the results are evil, we thereby become allies of those evil spirits who through the bad things of the world are seeking to destroy men; and that, if by the countenance thus given to evil we obtain pleasure or profit, we thereby accept and drink a cup which demons hold to our lips.


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Bibliography
Beet, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". Joseph Beet's Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jbc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1877-90.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Israelites provoked the Lord to jealousy by doing just such a thing when they joined in Moabite worship ( Numbers 25; cf. Deuteronomy 32:17; Deuteronomy 32:21-22). We are to learn from their experiences. It would be folly to provoke the Lord unless we are stronger than He. If we provoke Him and are not, we can count on His chastening since He is a jealous God.

The Corinthians were arguing for the right to attend pagan religious meals. They even viewed attendance as a way of building their "weaker" brethren. Paul responded that attendance was wrong on two counts: it was unloving, and it was incompatible with life in Christ, which their participation in the Lord"s Table symbolized. He forbade any relationship with the demonic. The demonic is not as remote as some modern Western Christians would like to believe.


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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/1-corinthians-10.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

1 Corinthians 10:22. What? do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he? The allusion is to Deuteronomy 32:21, and almost the words are from it. The word “jealousy,” as applied to God, seems to express the sense of slighted love in one of two wedded parties towards the other; an idea familiar to the Old Testament with reference to Jehovah’s relation to His people Israel, and their treatment of Him. Here this idea is transferred to Christ; for since “the table of the Lord” certainly means Christ’s eucharistic table, “the Lord,” whom they “provoked to jealousy” by partaking both of it and of idol-feasts, must be the Lord Jesus. (And so, with true critical instinct, De Wette, Meyer, Stanley, and Alford understand it) In fact, as all the relations of Jehovah to His covenant people under the ancient economy were appropriated by our Lord to Himself—who served Himself Heir to them allso our apostle, applying these to Him as a matter of course, puts the question, Mean ye to try how far His patience will go? Would ye try your strength against His?

This whole subject is now closed with a brief recapitulation of the principles applicable to it, and the proper application of them.


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/1-corinthians-10.html. 1879-90.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

1 Corinthians 10:22 Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

"provoke the Lord to jealousy?"-"Or will you continue eating at both meals, and thus arouse the Lord"s jealousy, as Israel did in the desert?" (Fee p. 473) (Deuteronomy 32:17; Deuteronomy 32:21) "Or are we trying to stir up God"s anger" (Nor)

"jealousy"-"The term "jealousy"..related to his holiness and power, in which he is to be understood as so absolutely without equal that he will brook no rivals to his devotion." (Fee p. 474) (Exodus 20:5)

"are we stronger than he?"-"Those who would put God to the test by insisting on their right to what Paul insists is idolatry are in effect taking God on, challenging him by their actions, daring him to act." (Fee p. 474)

Point to Note:

1. We can move God to jealousy by trying to flirt with sin and serve Him at the same time. (James 4:4)

2. We can also move God to jealousy by "accepting" other religions as credible. People don"t realize, that saying that a person can be saved without Christ, is saying that the God who wrote the Bible does have an equal in the spiritual realm!

CONCERNING MARKETPLACE FOOD:


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Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/1-corinthians-10.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

provoke . . . to jealousy. Greek. parazelod. See Romans 10:15.

Lord. App-98.

are we, &c. This question is introduced by me, expecting a negative answer. Notice the vividness given to the apostle"s argument by the use of the Figure of speech Erotesis in verses: 1 Corinthians 10:10, 1 Corinthians 10:16, 1 Corinthians 16:18, 1 Corinthians 16:19, 1 Corinthians 16:22.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-corinthians-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? - by dividing our fellowship between Him and idols (Ezekiel 20:39). The Greek has 'Or' preceding 'Shall we yield to God's will?' 'Or' do we wish to provoke Him to assert His power? (Deuteronomy 32:21; Exodus 20:5.)

Are we stronger? - that we can risk a contest with Him.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-corinthians-10.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

Or do we want to make the Lord jealous? As sensible men, they must see the absurdity, as well as the danger, in such double-dealing. Jehovah is a jealous God (Exodus 20:5). He will not share his worshipers with demons!


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/1-corinthians-10.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?
we provoke
Exodus 20:5; 34:14; Deuteronomy 4:24; 6:15; 32:16,21; Joshua 24:19; Psalms 78:58; Zephaniah 1:18
are
Job 9:4; 40:9-14; Ezekiel 22:14; Hebrews 10:31

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-corinthians-10.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

Jealousy is the feeling which arises from wounded love, and is the fiercest of all human passions. It is therefore employed as an illustration of the hatred of God towards idolatry. It is as when a bride transfers her affections from her lawful husband, in every way worthy of her love, to some degraded and offensive object. This illustration, feeble as it is, is the most effective that can be borrowed from human relations, and is often employed in Scripture to set forth the heinousness of the sin of idolatry. Deuteronomy 32:21. Psalms 78:58 and elsewhere. Or do we provoke, i.e. is it our object to provoke the Lord to jealousy. The Corinthians ought not to attend these feasts unless they intended to excite against themselves in the highest measure the displeasure of the Lord. And they ought not thus to excite his anger, unless they were stronger than he. By the Lord is to be understood Christ, as the context requires. It was the Lord's table that was forsaken, and the same Lord that was provoked thereby to jealousy. Here again, the relation in which Christians stand to Christ, is said to be analogous to that in which the Israelites stood to Jehovah. Christ is therefore our Jehovah. He is our husband, to whom our supreme affection is due, and who loves us as a husband loves his wife. "Thy maker is thy husband, Jehovah is his name," Isaiah 54:5; see Ephesians 5:25-31.


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Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/1-corinthians-10.html.

: Or do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?

In studying this verse we should bear in mind the relationship that Christ has with the church (it is described as His bride, Ephesians 5:22-32). Prior to the New Testament era the nation of Israel used to be God's bride ( Ezekiel 16:1-63). Now the New Testament church is pictured in this way and the "marriage" of the Lord and the church (Christians) will be culminated at the end of time. Paul's asking the Corinthians if they were trying to "provoke the Lord to jealousy" is based on the imagery of Ephesians 5:22-32. It is equivalent to asking if a man would be angered by his fiance (wife) joining herself to someone else. As a man would be angry with an unfaithful fianc or spouse, so God was angered by the Corinthians' association with false gods, deities that were actually the basis for demon worship (compare verse20).

Provoke (parazeloo) is a present tense verb and it suggests continued provocation or prodding. God is a "jealous God" ( Exodus 20:5), so flirting with or outright association with idols was a very bad choice. As shown in the commentary on verses7-8 , the nation of Israel learned this point the hard way. This argument adds to the previous ones concerning the need to abandon all involvement with idolatry (compare verse14).

At the end of verse22we find another question: Are we stronger than God? If the Corinthians persisted in their involvement with idols, God would dispense justice. Moreover, if God did punish the Corinthians for their involvement with idols, would these Christians be able to withstand His judgment (retribution)? Would an idol deliver them from God's wrath? Unless the Corinthians were as strong as God, they needed to quickly and fully flee from all forms of idolatry. Stronger (ischuros) is the same term used in 1 Corinthians 1:25. There Paul said the weakness of God is still stronger than all of man's power and abilities.


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Bibliography
Price, Brad "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:22". "Living By Faith: Commentary on Romans". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bpc/1-corinthians-10.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Saturday, September 21st, 2019
the Week of Proper 19 / Ordinary 24
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