Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 21:20

Ahab said to Elijah, "Have you found me, O my enemy?" And he answered, "I have found you, because you have sold yourself to do evil in the sight of the Lord .
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Ahab;   Character;   Elijah;   Homicide;   Judgments;   Prophecy;   Repentance;   Reproof;   Wicked (People);   Women;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bondage, Spiritual;   Concealment-Exposure;   Courage;   Courage-Fear;   Courageous Reformers;   Elijah;   Exposure;   Leaders;   Liberty-Bondage;   Magistrates;   Nation, the;   Palliation-Denunciation;   Rebuke;   Reformers, Courageous;   Religious;   Rulers;   Sin;   Sinners;   Sold under Sin;   Wicked, the;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Character of the Wicked;   Kings;   Prophets;   Reproof;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jezebel;   Jezreel;   Joram or Jehoram;   Naboth;   Vine;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ahab;   Elijah;   Jezebel;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Elijah;   Naboth;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Elijah;   Herod;   Micaiah;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Festivals;   King, Kingship;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Naboth;   Oracles;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Government;   Justice;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jehu ;   Jezebel ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Naboth;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elijah;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Eli'jah;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Urim and Thummim;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   Babylonish Captivity, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ahab;   Enchantment;   Jezebel;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thou hast sold thyself to work evil - See a similar form of speech, Romans 7:14; (note). Thou hast totally abandoned thyself to the service of sin. Satan is become thy absolute master, and thou his undivided slave.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-kings-21.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The words “O mine enemy,” may refer partly to the old antagonism (marginal reference; 1 Kings 17:1; 1 Kings 19:2-3); but the feeling which it expresses is rather that of present oppositions - the opposition between good and evil, light and darkness John 3:20.

Thou hast sold thyself to work evil - Compare the marginal references. The metaphor is taken from the practice of men‘s selling themselves into slavery, and so giving themselves wholly up to work the will of their master. This was a widespread custom in the ancient world.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-21.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

1 Kings 21:20

Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?

Ahab and Elijah

The keynote of Elijah’s character is force--the force of righteousness. The New Testament, you remember, talks about the “power of Elias.” The outward appearance of the man corresponds to his function and his character. The whole of his career is marked by this one thing--the strength of a righteous man. And then, on the other hand, this Ahab; the keynote of his character is the weakness of wickedness, and the wickedness of weakness. And so the deed is done: Naboth safe stoned out of the way; and Ahab goes down to take possession! The lesson of that is, my friend--Weak dallying with forbidden desires is sure to end in wicked clutching at them: But my business now is rather with the consequences of this apparently successful sin, than with what went before it. The king gets the crime done, shuffles it off himself on to the shoulders of his ready tools in the little village, goes down to get his toy, and gets it--but he gets Elijah along with it, which was more than he reckoned on.

I. Pleasure won by sin is peace lost. Action and reaction, as the mechanicians tell us, are equal and contrary. The more violent the blow with which we strike upon the forbidden pleasure, the further back the rebound after the stroke. When sin tempts--when there hangs glittering before a man the golden fruit that he knows he ought not to touch-then, amidst the noise of passion or the sophistry of desire, conscience is silenced for a little while. Conscience and consequence are alike lost sight of. Like a mad bull, the man that is tempted lowers his head and shuts his eyes, and rushes right on. The moment that the sin is done, that moment the passion or desire which tempted to it is satiated, and ceases to exist for the time. It is gone as a motive. Like some savage beast, being fed full, it lies down to sleep. There is a vacuum left in the heart, the noise is stilled, and then--and then--conscience begins to speak. Now, you will say that all that is true in regard to the grossest forms of transgression, but that it is not true in regard to the less vulgar and sensual kinds of crime. Of course it is most markedly observable with regard to the coarsest kind of sins; but it is as true, though perhaps not in the same degree-not in the same prominent, manifest way at any rate--in regard to every sin that a man does. There is never an evil thing which--knowing it to be evil--we commit, which does not rise up to testify against us. As surely as to-night’s debauch is followed by to-morrow’s headache; so surely--each after its kind, and each in its own region--every sin lodges in the human heart the seed of a quickspringing punishment, yea, is its own punishment. When we come to grasp the sweet thing that we have been tempted to seize, there is a serpent that starts up amongst all the flowers. When the evil act is done--opposite of the prophet’s roll--it is sweet in the lips, but oh! it is bitter afterwards. “At the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder!” The silence of a seared conscience is not peace. For peace you want something more than that a conscience shall be dumb. For peace you want something more than that you shall be able to live without the daily sense and sting of sin. You want not only the negative absence of pain, but the positive presence of a tranquillising guest in your heart--that conscience of yours testifying with you, blessing you in its witness, and shedding abroad rest and comfort.

II. Sin is blind to its true friends and its real foes. “Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?” Elijah was the best friend he had in his kingdom. And that Jezebel there, the wife of his bosom, whom he loved and thanked for this thing, she was the worst foe that hell could have sent him. Ay, and so it is always. The faithful rebuker, the merciful inflictor of pain, is the truest friend of the wrong doer. The worst enemy of the sinful heart is the voice that either tempts it into sin, or lulls it into self-complacency,

III. The sin which mistakes the friendly appeal for an enemy, lays up for itself a terrible retribution. Elijah comes here and prophesies the fall of Ahab. The next peal, the next flash, fulfil the prediction. There, where he did the wrong, he died. In Jezreel, Ahab died. In Jezreel, Jezebel died. That plain was the battlefield for the subsequent discomfiture of Israel. (A. Maclaren, D. D.)

Success that fails

Ahab went out to take possession of a garden of herbs, and there he stands face to face with righteousness, face to face with honour, face to face with judgment. Now take the vineyard! He cannot! An hour since the sun shone upon it, and now it is black as if it were part of the midnight which has gathered in judgment. There is a success which is failure. We cannot take some prizes. Elijah will not allow us! When we see him we would that a way might open under our feet that we might flee and escape the judgment of his silent look. If any man is about to take unholy prizes, let him remember that he will be met on the road by the spirit of judgment and by the spirit of righteousness. If any man is attempting to scheme for some little addition to his position or fortune, in the heart of which scheme there is injustice, untruthfulness, covetousness, or a wrong spirit, let him know that he may even kill Naboth, but cannot enter into Naboth’s vineyard. (J. Parker, D. D.)

The tragedy of Jezreel

When a man gives way to lust and coveting, does not struggle against them, a tempter is sure to be at hand to put him on gratifying them one way or another.

1. “Be sure,” said Moses to the Reubenites, “Your sin will find you out.” (Numbers 32:23). What an exemplification here! how literally was Elijah’s denunciation fulfilled! Yes, and history and human experience are ever bearing witness to this, that sin finds out the sinner; and that, not simply in punishment following sin, but in the sin becoming its own means of detection and punishment--in a certain correlation of sin and its penalty. “Thine own wickedness” etc (Jeremiah 2:19). “Be not deceived, God is not mocked,” etc. (Galatians 6:7). “Whoso breaketh a hedge,” etc. (Ecclesiastes 10:8).

2. Success in wrongdoing the sinner’s loss. Better indeed had it been for Ahab if Jezebel’s scheme had failed. Men often fret and fume if thwarted in attaining some coveted object, yet may it have been their mercy to be so thwarted. It is Divine goodness which again and again hedges up our way, and providentially coerces us. To be given up to the devices and desires of our own hearts is the sorest of judgments.

3. The fatal mistake of resenting righteous rebuke. Terrible was Ahab’s mistake in calling Elijah his enemy. That uncompromising rebuker, his truest friend, would he only have listened to him instead of yielding to the siren seductions of Jezebel. (A. R. Symonds, M. A.)

Blind to one’s own guilt

1. That which first of all blinded Ahab more or less to the true character and extent of his responsibility for the death of Naboth was the force of desire. A single desire long dwelt upon, cherished, and indulged, has a blinding power which cannot easily be exaggerated. Ahab had long looked wistfully from his villa across the moat of Jezreel at the vineyard of Naboth. There it lay, beautiful in itself, most desirable as an appendage to the royal property. Without it the summer villa was obviously incomplete, and each visit to Jezreel would have strengthened the king’s wish to possess it. It was not that he enjoyed to baulk a great man’s wishes in the spirit of that rough and surly independence which is sometimes fostered by the near neighbourhood of a Court; it was not that he was governed by a natural sentiment common in all ages and civilisations against parting with an old family property; it was that the sacred law did not permit the exchange or the sale. With a view to maintaining the original distribution of landed property among the tribes, and of preventing the accumulation of large landed estates in a few hands, the Mosaic law forbade the alienation of lands or families holding them; and especially it forbade the transfer from one tribe to another. And this is the meaning of Naboth’s exclamation, “The Lord forbid it me that I should give the inheritance of my fathers unto thee.” Desire is not always wrong in its early stages, and so long as it is under control of principle it is a motive, a useful motive power in human life. But when it finds itself in conflict with the rights of other men, and, above all, in conflict with the laws and with the rights of God, it must be suppressed unless it is to lead to crime. When Naboth declined to sell or to exchange his vineyard, Ahab ought to have ceased to desire it. Ahab went back to his palace baulked of his desire by the conscientious resistance of Naboth. The impulsive force in life is not thought, nor will, but desire. Thought sees its object; will gives orders with a view to attain it; but without desire thought is powerless, and will, in the operative sense, does not exist. Desire is to the human soul what gravitation is to the heavenly bodies. Ascertain the object of a man’s desire, and you know the direction in which his soul is moving; ascertain the strength of a man’s desire, and you know the rapidity of the soul’s movement. In St. Augustine’s memorable words, “Whithersoever I am carried forward it is desire that carries me.” Quocumque feror amore feror. If the supreme object of desire is God, then desire becomes the grace of charity, and carries the soul onwards and upwards to the true source of its existence. If the supreme object of desire be something earthly, some person, some possession, then desire becomes what Scripture calls concupiscence, and carries the soul downwards--downwards to those regions in which the soul is buried and stifled by matter and sense. Concupiscence is desire diverted from its true object--God--and centred upon some created object which perverts and degrades it; and concupiscence grows by self-indulgence; it may very easily pass a point at which it can be no longer controlled, it may absorb as into a practically resistless current all the other interests and movements of the soul; it may concentrate with an all-increasing importunity the whole body and stock of feeling and passion upon some trifling object upon which, for the moment, it is bent, and which, by absorbing it, blinds it--blinds it utterly to the true proportions and value of things into the true meaning and import of action. So it was with Pharaoh when he set out in the pursuit of Israel; so it was with the vain and miserable Haman when he set his heart on exterminating the Jews; so it was with Ahab.

2. And a second cause, which could have blinded Ahab to the true character of his responsibility for the murder of Naboth, was the ascendant influence and prominent agency of his queen, Jezebel. Ahab could not have enjoyed the results of Jezebel’s achievement, and decline to accept responsibility for it; yet, no doubt, he was more than willing to do this, more than willing to believe that matters had drifted somehow into other hands than his, and that the upshot, regrettable, no doubt, in one sense, but in another not altogether unwelcome, was beyond his control. It is to-day, as of old, that false conscience constantly endeavours to divest itself of responsibility for what has been done through others, or for what others had been allowed by us to do. This is the origin of that saying, “Corporations have no conscience.” The fact is that every individual member of a corporation gets too easily into the habit of thinking that all, or some of the other members are really answerable for the acts of tim whole, and that each merely acquiesces in what the others decide or do. But then, if everybody thinks this, where, meanwhile, does the real responsibility reside?--it must be somewhere, it cannot evaporate altogether. In very large bodies of men acting together, the responsibility is divided into very small portions of unequal magnitude; this is the case with nations and with churches, but responsibility is not destroyed by being thus distributed; while, on the other hand- the smaller the corporation the greater the responsibility of each one of its members. Thus the responsibility of each member of the British legislature for the well-being of the country is vastly greater than that of each Englishman who possesses a vote, and that of each member of the Cabinet is vastly greater than that of each member of Parliament. Ahab and Jezebel were at this time, practically speaking, the governing corporation in Israel, but Ahab could not shift his responsibility on Jezebel.

3. And the third screen which would have blinded Ahab to the real state of the case was the perfection of the legal form which had characterised the proceedings. When Jezebel wrote to the magistrates of Jezreel she had been very careful indeed about legal propriety. She wrote in the “king’s name;” she signed the letter with the king’s seal, which would have borne the king’s signature, and this, when stamped on the writing, made the actual signature unnecessary. Thus the letter had nothing less than the character of a royal command, and was addressed to the persons at Jezreel with whom the administration of justice properly lay--the elders and notables, the local magistracy. Law is a great and sacred thing. It is nothing less than a shadow upon earth of the justice of God. The forms which surround it, the rules which give it the dignity and honour which belong to its representatives, are the outworks of a thing itself entitled to our reverence. But when the machinery of law is tampered with, as was, no doubt, the case by Jezebel, when a false witness or a biased judge contributes to a result which, if legal, is not also moral, then law is like an engine off the rails--its remaining force is the exact measure of its capacity for mischief and for wrong, then, indeed, if ever, Summum jus, summa injuria. Naboth’s trial and execution was, in truth, one of the earliest recorded samples in the world’s history of that dreadful outrage against God and man--a judicial murder. When the sword of justice smites down innocence and becomes the instrument of crime, the whole spirit and drift of law is abandoned, its language and its usages survive, and, as in Ahab’s case, they form a screen between a guilty conscience and the stern reality. Of the authors and abettors of such deeds as this, it was said in an earlier age, “They will not be learned nor understand, but walk on still in darkness: all the foundations of the earth are out of course.” The foundations are out of course! Yes, that is the effect bad law makes in many a case where consciences, the deepest and most precious things in the moral and social life of man, are ruined. Propriety of outward form in the condemnation of Naboth is the measure of the miserable self-deceit of Ahab.

1. Let us carry away two lessons, if no more. The first to keep all forms of desire well under control--under the control of conscience illuminated by principle, illuminated by faith. Some measure of desire is necessary for exertion; but the fewer wants we have the freer men we are, and the freer we are the happier we are. The one direction in which desire may be safely unchecked is heavenward. Safety lies in taking and keeping it well in hand, and in doing this betimes.

2. And, secondly, for us Christians the event or the man who discovers us to ourselves should be held to be not our enemy, but our friend. (Canon Liddon, D. D.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "1 Kings 21:20". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/1-kings-21.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Ahab said to Elijah, hast thou found me, O mine enemy?.... So he reckoned him, because he dealt faithfully with him, and reproved him for his sins, and denounced the judgments of God upon him for them:

and he answered, I have found thee; as a thief, a robber and plunderer, in another's vineyard; he had found out his sin in murdering Naboth, and unjustly possessing his vineyard, which was revealed to him by the Lord; and now was come as his enemy, as he called him, as being against him, his adversary, not that he hated his person, but his ways and works:

because thou hast sold thyself to work evil in the sight of the Lord; had given up himself wholly to his lusts, was abandoned to them, and as much under the power of them as a man is that has sold himself to another to be his slave; and which he served openly, publicly in the sight of the omniscient God, and in defiance of him. Abarbinel gives another sense of the word we render "sold thyself", that he "made himself strange", as if he was ignorant, and did not know what Jezebel had done; whereas he knew fully the whole truth of the matter, and that Naboth was killed through her contrivance, and by her management purposely; and so he did evil in the sight of that God that knows all things, pretending he was ignorant when he was not, and this Elijah found out by divine revelation; so the word is used in Genesis 42:6, but the former sense is best, as appears from 1 Kings 21:25.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-21.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

thou hast sold thyself to work evil — that is, allowed sin to acquire the unchecked and habitual mastery over thee (2 Kings 17:17; Romans 7:11).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-kings-21.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Ahab said to Elijah, Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? And he answered, I have found thee: because thou hast sold thyself to work evil in the sight of the LORD.

Hast thou found — Dost thou pursue me from place to place? Wilt thou never let me rest? Art thou come after me hither with thy unwelcome messages? Thou art always disturbing, threatening, and opposing me.

I have — The hand of God hath found and overtaken thee.

Sold thyself — Thou hast wholly resigned up thyself to be the bondslave of the devil, as a man that sells himself to another is totally in his master's power.

To work evil, … — Impudently and contemptuously. Those who give themselves up to sin will certainly be found out, sooner or later, to their unspeakable amazement.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-21.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE REBUKE OF SIN

‘And Ahab said to Elijah, Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? And he answered, I have found thee: because thou hast sold thyself to work evil in the sight of the Lord.’

1 Kings 21:20

We are like Ahab: we hate to be reproved—it is so troublesome, it is so annoying. When the Church, or her ministers, or the voices of individual consciences rebuke some fault which has grown old among men, they look on the messengers of God very much as Ahab did on Elijah, and they know not that, all the while, it is God of Whom they are complaining.

I. God’s Providence permits no soul to do wrong without warning, nor, having sinned, to be at peace without rebuke. However depraved, however steeped in vice, however abandoned, or however innocent hitherto, at each step downward God meets the individual soul. It may be by circumstances, by personal loss, by bereavement, by the voice of conscience, by a thousand other ways, God stands in the way, willing rather that men shall be turned from their sin and be saved. All through the history of God’s revelation, as it is recorded in Holy Scripture, this principle is apparent; in the sight of the people Noah was building the Ark of Salvation, the sign of wrath to come. The people of Sodom were first rebuked by the presence of Lot. In Egypt, Moses warned Pharaoh after almost every plague. On the night of Belshazzar’s overthrow there appeared the mysterious hand on the wall writing his doom. King Herod had no rest in his adultery with his brother Philip’s wife.

II. The way of God is to withstand wilful sin.—Daily we pray, ‘Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil,’ and most surely He does so, if men would only see and take advantage of His warnings. He makes no difference between the hardened sinner and the honest though weak disciple. Whenever you hear of a determined Ahab, you hear of a fearless Elijah. Or, if it be a David who has forgotten himself, there is always at hand a Nathan to warn him by a parallel case, and to say, ‘Thou art the man.’ Or, if there be no man to speak, God will speak in other ways: trouble, sorrow, sickness, loss, are all the silent messengers of the Almighty, and in the silence of the night, or the solitude of despair, when the heart cries out, ‘O God! wherefore is all this come upon me?’ the still small voice of conscience strives within you, ‘Hast thou not forsaken God and broken His commandments?’

III. Every obstacle which confronts the deliberate sinner is surely the sign of the Lord’s Presence. It is like the angel of the Lord standing before Balaam, with his sword in his hand, whom Balaam could not see until his eyes were opened. And so, when a man sets about a deliberate sin, he may expect obstacles put in his way, because we know while God hates the sin He loves the sinner, and would warn him and save him. Or suppose that he has committed the sin that, like Ahab, he has killed and taken possession, or like David when he caused Uriah to be killed, or like Herod who was living in his sin—still God leaves him not alone, and an Elijah, or a Nathan, or a Baptist appears when least expected, and his pleasure becomes bitterness.

Rev. S. J. Childs Clarke.

Illustration

‘God deals with us in many ways. Our experience, open and secret, is full of circumstances of His providential warning and correction; but do men always profit by these warnings? How do they look upon them? Some are angry, as Cain, who we read was “very wroth, and his countenance fell.” Some scoff as the men of Sodom did, who said, “This one fellow came in to sojourn, and he will needs be a judge.” And some are defiant, as Pharaoh—“Get thee from me, take heed to thyself, see my face no more; for in that day thou seest my face thou shalt die.” And some, while complaining of their lot, are submissive for a time, but after awhile harden their hearts, as in the case of Ahab, who for a time was penitent. And some repent with tears, as St. Peter did. When the Master turned and looked upon him he saw in that look not the rebuke of an enemy, but the love of the true Friend and Saviour. God grant that in sickness or bereavement, loss or sorrow, or when the Church, her minister, or the voice of conscience speaks to rebuke some sin, we may perceive not the visitation of an enemy, but the guiding Hand of our Heavenly Father.’

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Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/1-kings-21.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 21:20 And Ahab said to Elijah, Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? And he answered, I have found [thee]: because thou hast sold thyself to work evil in the sight of the LORD.

Ver. 20. Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?] And why an enemy, but because he told him the truth? See Micah 2:7. {See Trapp in "Micah 2:7"} Truth breedeth hatred, as the fair nymphs are feigned to have done the foul fauni and satyrs.

An expectas ut Quintilianus ametur? ” - Juvenal.

Because thou hast sold thyself to work evil.] Though thou art sure to rue the bargain; as at length all those shall that abandon themselves to wicked practices, {see 2 Kings 17:17} ut fiant pabulum morris et fomentum Gehennae. Such dustheaps are to be found in every corner - men that work "all uncleanness with greediness." [Ephesians 4:19]

In the sight of the Lord.] And, as it were, in despite of him.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-21.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

1 Kings 21:20

In this story there are three things to be noticed:—

I. The cowardice of guilt. Ahab quailed before Elijah like a coward and a slave. A guilty conscience can make a coward even of a king.

II. Friends mistaken for enemies. Ahab called Elijah his enemy. He thought him his enemy because he did not encourage him in his sins, as others did, but reproved him and tried to turn him from them. There are people who take God for their Enemy, just as Ahab called Elijah by this name. Surely sin can never deceive us so completely as when it leads us to this horrible mistake.

III. Enemies disguised as friends. Ahab thought Jezebel his friend when she got him the vineyard he coveted. He thought the magistrates his friends who so basely put Naboth to death. He thought the prophets of Baal his friends who feasted at his table and flattered him with their smooth tongues. He thought them his friends, but they were his worst enemies. You may be sure he is a false friend who encourages you to act contrary to the wishes of your parents and to the wishes of your Father in heaven.

J. Stalker, The New Song, and Other Sermons for the Children's Hour, p. 181.


I. We see here, in the first place, this broad principle.: pleasure won by sin is peace lost. While sin is yet tempting us it is loved; when sin is done, it is loathed. Naboth's blood stains the leaves of Naboth's garden. Elijah is always waiting at the gate of the ill-gotten possession.

II. Sin is blind to its true friends and its real foes. Elijah was the best friend Ahab had in the kingdom. Jezebel was the worst tempter that hell could have sent him. This is one of the certainest workings of evil desires in our own spirits, that they pervert to us all the relations of things, that they make us blind to all the truths of God's universe. Sin, perverted and blinded, stumbles about in its darkness, and mistakes the friend for the foe and the foe for the friend. Sin makes us fancy that God Himself is our Enemy.

III. The sin that mistakes the friendly appeal for an enemy lays up for itself a terrible retribution. Elijah comes here and prophesies the fall of Ahab. The next peal, the next flash, fulfil the prediction. In Jezreel Ahab died; in Jezreel Jezebel died. If we will not listen to God's message and turn at its gentle rebuke, then we gather up for ourselves an awful futurity of judgment.

A. Maclaren, Sermons Preached in Manchester, 1861, p. 265 (see also 1st series, p. 222).


Here we see God's providential care even of such a person as Ahab, so utterly given up to all manner of wickedness. It is a very fearful picture, yet full of mercy and encouragement to true repentance.

I. In God's dealings with Ahab we see a great law of His universal providence: not usually to leave sinners at ease in their sins. This is His great and unspeakable mercy to those who least seem to deserve it. Left to themselves, they must surely perish, but God does not leave them to themselves.

II. Neither need we doubt what His meaning is in so doing. He wills them to repent; He would not have them die. The untoward accidents, the unexpected turns, the strange and sudden failures, which happen to them, are so many checks from His fatherly hand, so many calls to a better mind.

III. Even Ahab's small beginning of repentance is so far pleasing to Almighty God that in consideration of it He promises to bring the destruction of his house, not in Ahab's days, but in his son's days. Who knows how much greater mercy might have been shown him had his repentance continued and grown deeper? God finds us, as Elijah found Ahab, not as an Enemy, though His first sternness may well alarm such as we are, but as our true and only-sufficient Friend.

Plain Sermons by Contributors to "Tracts for the Times" vol. viii., p. 158 (see also J. Keble, Sermons for the Christian Year: Sundays after Trinity, Part I., p. 383).


I. That which first of all blinded Ahab to the true character and extent of his responsibility for the death of Naboth was the force of desire. A single desire, long dwelt upon, cherished, and indulged, has a blinding power which cannot easily be exaggerated. Desire is not always wrong in its early stages, and so long as it is under control of principle it is a useful motive power in human life. But when it finds itself in conflict with the rights of other men and, above all, in conflict with the laws and with the rights of God, it must be suppressed, unless it is to lead to crime. When Naboth declined to sell or exchange his vineyard, Ahab should have ceased to desire it. Desire is to the human soul what gravitation is to the heavenly bodies. In St. Augustine's memorable words, "Quocumque feror amove feror."

II. A second cause which may have blinded Ahab to the true character of his responsibility for the murder of Naboth was the ascendant influence and prominent agency of his queen, Jezebel. Ahab was bad and weak; Jezebel was worse and strong. Ahab could not have enjoyed the results of Jezebel's achievement and decline the responsibility for it; yet no doubt he was more than willing to do this, more than willing to believe that matters had drifted somehow into other hands than his, and that the upshot, regrettable, no doubt, in one sense, but in another not altogether unwelcome, was beyond his control. False conscience constantly endeavours to divest itself of responsibility for what has been done through others, or for what others have been allowed by us to do.

III. The third screen which may have blinded Ahab to the real state of the case was the perfection of the legal form which had characterised the proceedings. The old religious forms had been respected; the constitutional authorities had put the law in motion. Nothing could have been so very far wrong when ancient rule and living administration combined to bring about a practical result, and Ahab might well let the matter rest and enjoy the vineyard of Naboth.

Law is a great and sacred thing; but when the machinery of law is tampered with, as was, no doubt, the case with Jezebel, its remaining force is the exact measure of its capacity for mischief and for wrong. Then, indeed, if ever, "summum jus summa injuria."

From this story let us carry away two lessons: (1) the first to keep all forms of desire well under control; (2) for us Christians, the event or the man who discovers us to ourselves should be held to be, not our enemy, but our friend.

H. P. Liddon, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxii., p. 113.


It is thus that sinners regard God's messenger. He is their enemy. He may be discharging a solemn duty reluctantly, unwillingly, with great pain to himself and kindness in his heart; it matters not if he carries God's message, if he speaks the truth, if he loves righteousness, he is regarded as an enemy by one who will not be saved.

I. God's messengers to us are various. Sometimes He sends a man to us, addresses the sinner by a human voice, and confronts him face to face with the minister of righteousness. When the Christian pastor seeks to speak in God's behalf to persons sunk in sin and to warn them, as they would escape from the wrath to come, to cleanse themselves while they can from that which is provoking God's judgment every day, how often is he reminded in his own experience of Ahab's speech to Elijah! "Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?" may be the language of the manner, if not of the lips.

II. But God's messengers are not all men; and the chief power of the human messenger lies in his close connection with another, not of flesh and blood. The prophet was Ahab's enemy just because he was in concert with an enemy. The real enemy was not he, but conscience. Once let a man break loose from God, once let him give himself up to his self-will, lead him where it may, and forthwith increasingly, at last utterly, he will find his conscience his foe.

III. If it seems strange that any one should count his own conscience as an enemy, is it not yet more wonderful that the same feeling should ever be shown towards the very Gospel of grace, towards the Saviour of sinners Himself? Yet there are multitudes of persons who pass through life regarding our Lord Jesus Christ as an Enemy. They are afraid of Him, and therefore they keep Him at a distance; they know that one day they will want Him, but they almost deliberately defer seeking Him till the late hour of a deathbed repentance.

IV. Human nature, and each several part of it, has an enemy; but it is just that one which counterfeits the voice and professes the interest of a friend. That one enemy is sin. If Ahab had said to Jezebel when she came to tempt him, "Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?" he would have had no cause to say it to Elijah when he came to judge.

C. J. Vaughan, Lessons of Life and Godliness, p. 186.


References: 1 Kings 21:20.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. xi., p. 18; J. Edmunds, Sixty Sermons, p. 326. 1 Kings 21:20-25,—Preacher's Monthly, vol. iv., p. 101.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/1-kings-21.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Kings 21:20. Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? Why art thou come to me, O mine enemy? Elijah answered, I am therefore come unto thee, because thou hast sold thyself, &c. The word sold, which is used by St. Paul, Romans 7:14 signifies the total giving up of one's self into the hand or power of another, and is a very strong and nervous expression for the total slavery of the soul to sin.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-kings-21.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 352

AHAB AND ELIJAH IN NABOTH’S VINEYARD

1 Kings 21:20. And Ahab said to Elijah, Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? And he answered, I have found thee.

THE office of a minister is doubtless the most honourable that can be sustained by man; but it is at the same time the most arduous. If indeed the people to whom we carry the glad tidings of salvation were willing to put away their sins and embrace the proffered mercy, there would be comparatively little difficulty in discharging our duty: but men are averse to receive our message: they “love darkness rather than light;” yea, “they hate the light,” and would even extinguish it, rather than be constrained to see the evil of their ways. Hence those ministers who are faithful, are universally accounted “the troublers of Israel,” and the “enemies” of those whom they labour to convert: and they must go with their lives in their hands, if they will approve themselves to God and to their own conscience. The justice of this observation is manifest from the address of Ahab to the Prophet Elijah: in which we see,

I. How greedily men commit sin—

Horrible beyond measure was the conduct of Ahab which is here recorded—

[We blame not his wish to be accommodated with Naboth’s vineyard, nor the equitable offers which he made to obtain it: but we blame the inordinate desire which he entertained for so worthless an object, and the vexation which the disappointment of it occasioned. What a striking proof have we here of the misery which unsubdued lusts create! A king possessed of large dominions, augmented lately by the acquisition of immense power, is dejected, and sick at heart, because he cannot obtain a little plot of ground adjoining to his palace, of ground which the owner could not alienate consistently with the commands of God.

Jezebel his wife, indignant that a potent monarch, like him, should be thwarted in his desires, undertakes that they shall not long be ungratified. She takes his seal, and gives orders in his name, that the elders of Israel shall proclaim a fast, as if some great iniquity which menaced the safety of the state had been committed; that then they shall arrest Naboth as the guilty person, and suborn false witnesses, who shall accuse him of blaspheming God and the king; and that they shall instantly proceed to stone him to death. Shocking as this injustice was, methinks its enormity was small in comparison of that impious mockery of religion with which it was cloked. But what must have been the state of that nation where such an order could be given so confidently, and be carried into execution with such facility! Truly we can never be sufficiently thankful for the equity with which our laws are administered in Britain, and the security which we enjoy, both of our lives and properly, under their protection.

The tidings of Naboth’s death being announced by Jezebel, Ahab instantly proceeded to take possession of his vineyard; manifesting thereby his perfect approbation of all that Jezebel had done. Conscious of his cordial participation in her crimes, he could make no reply to the prophet’s accusation, “Hast thou killed, and also taken possession?” He could only say, “Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?” In truth, his own conscience testified against him, that “he had sold himself to work evil in the sight of the Lord.”]

Horrible as this was, and far surpassing any thing which is commonly found amongst us, it yet is in many respects imitated by the great mass of mankind—

[It is surely no uncommon thing for men at this day to covet what belongs not to them, and so inordinately to desire it as to use unlawful and dishonest means of obtaining it. Nor is it uncommon for men to feel a disappointment so acutely, as to lose the enjoyment of every thing they possess through vexation about something unpossessed. And so are the consciences of some men formed, that they will connive at wickedness which of themselves they would not perpetrate, and avail themselves of the advantages which the iniquity of others has procured for them. Let valuable articles be offered for sale as having been clandestinely imported without a payment of the accustomed due; how few will turn away from them on account of the unlawful way in which they have been procured! How few will say, “Perhaps a conflict has been maintained for these, and the blood of some revenue-officer has been shed to preserve them:” at all events such risks are incurred by this traffic, and the lives of multitudes are daily endangered by it; and shall I satisfy my appetite with that for which so many “have jeoparded their lives [Note: 2 Samuel 23:15-17.]?” No: the generality of persons, who yet pretend to be honest and humane, will be as pleased with the possession of what has been thus iniquitously gained, as ever Ahab was with the acquisition of Naboth’s vineyard.

Again, there are those who for lucre sake will aid in betraying or corrupting an innocent unsuspecting female: and how many are there who would readily enough avail themselves of an advantage so obtained; or at least conspire to rivet the chains once forged, and to derive pleasure to themselves from the misery of their fellow-creatures!

Alas! the world is full of characters, whose “hearts are exercised with covetous practices [Note: 2 Peter 2:14.],” and who “work all uncleanness with greediness [Note: Ephesians 4:19.],” or, as the prophet expresses it, “do evil with both hands earnestly [Note: Micah 7:2-3. This paints with great exactness the conduct of multitudes who tread in the steps of Ahab: and the last clause expresses their complacency in their sins.].”]

If we presume to remonstrate with such persons, we shall soon see,

II. How indignantly they take reproof—

Great was the indignation which Ahab expressed against Elijah—

[Possibly there might be some surprise expressed in that question, “Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?” Certain it is that Ahab little expected to find Elijah there; nor would he have gone down to the vineyard of Naboth, if he had at all conceived that he should have met there such an unwelcome monitor. But there was also much wrath contained in this address: “What business hast thou here? What dost thou mean by presuming to interfere with me? Art thou privy to what has been done? and art thou come to gratify thy spleen as in past times by denouncing judgments against me?” Never was a human being so odious in Ahab’s eyes, as Elijah was at this moment.]

This however only shews what is in the heart of all against the faithful servants of the Lord—

[Ministers are sent by God as monitors, to “shew the house of Jacob their sins [Note: Isaiah 58:1.]:” but who welcomes them in that character? Let them go to any company, or even to an individual, that is violating the laws of God, and let them testify against the evil that is committed; will their admonitions be received with thankfulness? Will not their interposition be deemed rather an impertinent intrusion? Yes; such is the light in which it will be viewed, however gross and unjustifiable the sin it that has been committed. When Amaziah had conquered the Edomites, he took their gods to be his gods in preference to Jehovah: and when Jehovah sent him a prophet to remonstrate with him on the folly and impiety of his conduct, instead of yielding to the reproof, he threatened the prophet with death, if he did not instantly “forbear [Note: 2 Chronicles 25:16.].” In the same light it is viewed, however gentle and kind the expostulation may be. When the inhabitants of Sodom required of Lot to deliver up to them the men whom he had received under his roof, nothing could exceed the tenderness of his reproof; “I pray you, brethren, do not so wickedly.” Nay, he even adopted the unjustifiable expedient of offering them his two daughters in their stead: yet, notwithstanding this astonishing condescension, they were full of wrath against him, and threatened to “deal worse with him than with them [Note: Genesis 19:5-9.].” We must further say, that it was viewed in this light, when God himself became the monitor. When Cain had murdered his brother Abel, God came to him and asked, “Where is Abel thy brother?” to which this impious reply was made, “I know not: Am I my brother’s keeper [Note: Genesis 4:9.]?” The truth is, that men think themselves at liberty to do what they please against God; but no one is to presume to espouse the cause of God against them [Note: Amos 5:10.]. The plain language of their hearts is, “Our lips are our own: Who is Lord over us [Note: Psalms 12:4.]?”

It would be well too if this presumptuous spirit were confined to those who are the open enemies of God: but it is not unfrequently found even amongst the professed followers of Christ; for it was to such that the Apostle addressed himself, when he said, “Am I become your enemy because I tell you the truth [Note: Galatians 4:16.]?” Let religious professors be on their guard against this great evil; for, in proportion as it prevails, it gives reason to fear that they are deceiving their own souls, and that their religion is vain.]

But how boldly soever they reply against God, we may see in the answer of Elijah,

III. How certainly they ruin their own souls—

The fearless prophet soon taught the murderous monarch what he was to expect—

[“I have found thee;” and God has found thee, and his judgments ere long will find thee too. Agreeably to the prediction of Elijah, though the judgments were deferred in consequence of Ahab’s forced humiliation, the blood of Ahab, like Naboth’s, was licked by dogs, and the body of Jezebel was devoured by them in the very place where Naboth had been destroyed by her command. And, not long after, the elders of that very city Jezreel, who at the command of Ahab had slain Naboth, slew all the seventy sons of Ahab in one single night at the command of Jehu [Note: 2 Kings 9:26.]: so exactly were the threatened judgments of Elijah executed upon him and upon his whole family.]

In like manner shall the judgments of God overtake all who continue obstinate in their sins—

[“He that being often reproved, hardeneth his neck, shall suddenly be destroyed, saith the Lord, and that without remedy.” Men hope that “they shall escape for their wickedness:” but God beholds it, and will call them to account for it in due season. It is in vain to think that any thing shall be hid from him: for “there is no darkness nor shadow of death, where the workers of iniquity may hide themselves [Note: Job 34:21-22.].” Adam, after the commission of his sin, hoped to hide himself from God; but God sought him out; “Adam, where art thou?” Achan thought he had altogether escaped notice; but God appointed the lot to fall upon him, when, according to human calculations, the chance was two millions to one in favour of his escape. On many occasions too the punishment has instantly followed the detection, as in Gehazi’s leprosy, and the sudden death of Ananias. But where the sins of men remain concealed or unpunished in this world, they shall not escape notice in the world to come; for “God will bring every secret thing into judgment;” and fulfil in its utmost extent that awful declaration of the Psalmist, “making them like a fiery oven in his anger, and swallowing them up in his wrath [Note: Psalms 21:8-9.].”]

This subject speaks powerfully to different characters;

1. To wilful and impenitent transgressors—

[What Moses said to all Israel, we must say to you, “Be sure your sin will find you out.” You may glory in your success, and “roll your iniquity under your tongue as a sweet morsel, as Ahab did, but your sin shall ere long meet you to your sorrow and confusion; yea, every sin that you have ever committed shall meet you at the bar of judgment; and, when addressed by you as Elijah was, shall return you the same answer as he did to Ahab; “Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? I have found thee.” The long-suffering of God may bear with you for a season; but “your judgment lingereth not, and your damnation slumbereth not [Note: 2 Peter 2:3; 2 Peter 3:9.].”]

2. To those who have repented of their sin—

[Your sins, purged away by the precious blood of Christ, shall be sought for, but not be found [Note: Jeremiah 50:20.]: God has “blotted them out as a morning cloud,” and “cast them all behind him into the very depths of the sea [Note: Micah 7:18-19.].” It is an express engagement of his covenant, that “your sins and iniquities he will remember no more [Note: Hebrews 10:17.].” Think, my Brethren, what an unspeakable mercy this is, and let it be your daily and hourly employment to abase yourselves before God, and to wash in the fountain of your Redeemer’s blood.]

3. To those who are God’s messengers to a guilty world—

[It is at the peril of the watchman’s soul, if through sloth or cowardice he neglect to warn men of their approaching danger. Brethren, we must, like Elijah, put ourselves in the way of sinners, and bear testimony for God against them. This is a painful, but necessary duty. You admire the discharge of it in Elijah; do not then disapprove of it in us. But we must “speak, whether ye will hear, or whether ye will forbear.” God’s command is plain, “He that hath my word, let him speak my word faithfully [Note: Jeremiah 23:28-29.].” O that every servant of the Lord might resemble this man of God! and that instead of having to appear as witnesses against you at the bar of judgment, we might now find you obedient to the word, and have you in that day as “our joy and crown of rejoicing” for evermore!]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/1-kings-21.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ahab said to Elijah; upon and after his delivery of the message last mentioned, which it was needless to repeat.

Hast thou found me? Dost thou pursue me from place to place? Wilt thou never let me rest? Art thou come after me hither with thy unwelcome messages?

O mine enemy; that art always disturbing, threatening, and opposing me, and expressing not so much God’s mind as thy own hatred and enmity against me. Compare 1 Kings 22:8.

I have found thee; the hand of God hath found and overtaken thee in the very act of thy sin.

Thou hast sold thyself; thou hast wilfully and wholly resigned up thyself to be the bond-slave of the devil, or Baal, and of wicked Jezebel, to do whatsoever they persuade thee to do; as a man that sells himself to another is totally in his master’s power, and must employ all his time and strength for his service. Compare 2 Kings 17:7: See Poole "Romans 7:14".

In the sight, i.e. impudently and contemptuously. Withal he minds him, that although his sin was in a great measure hid from the eyes of men by Jezebel’s cunning contrivance, yet it was evident and known to God, who would require it at his hands.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-21.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

20.Hast thou found me — Probably Ahab was trembling with alarm and terror as he uttered these words. He could not but have a profound fear of Elijah.

Mine enemy — He charges him with being an enemy in order to weaken the force of his words, and to quiet, somewhat, his own conscience.

Because thou hast sold thyself to work evil — Not because I am an enemy, and wish to persecute thee, but because thou hast made thyself a slave of sin, it is that I have found thee. To sell one’s self to do evil is to become so utterly abandoned to sin and crime as to lose all moral principle and power to resist evil.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-21.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 21:20. Ahab said to Elijah — Upon his delivery of the message last mentioned, which it was needless to repeat. Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? — Dost thou pursue me from place to place? Wilt thou never let me rest? Art thou come after me hither with thy unwelcome messages? Thou art always disturbing, threatening, and opposing me. I have found thee — The hand of God hath found and overtaken thee. Thou hast sold thyself — Thou hast wholly resigned up thyself to be the bond-slave of the devil, as a man that sells himself to another is totally in his master’s power. To work evil, &c. — Impudently and contemptuously. Those who give themselves up to sin, will certainly be found out, sooner or later, to their unspeakable amazement.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-21.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Thy enemy. Have I done thee any harm, whenever thou hast appeared before me? Hebrew and Septuagint, "O my enemy." (Haydock) --- To find, often means to attack or take by surprise. Art thou come thus, to fall upon me on the road? (Calmet) --- Sold. That is, so addicted to evil, as if thou hadst sold thyself to the devil, to be his slave to work all kind of evil. (Challoner) (Worthington) (St. Gregory, in Ezec. hom. 10.) --- The expression strongly marks the empire of the passions. Achab was sovereignly wicked, without any restraint. (Calmet) --- So Vitellius was: Luxui saginæque mancipatus, emptusque. (Tacitus, Hist. ii.) --- Sold, or "abandoned," are used in the same sense, Psalm xliii. 13.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-21.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

evil = the evil. Hebrew. ra"a". App-44.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-21.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Ahab said to Elijah, Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? And he answered, I have found thee: because thou hast sold thyself to work evil in the sight of the LORD.

Thou hast sold thyself to work evil - i:e., allowed sin to acquire the unchecked and habitual mastery over thee (2 Kings 17:17; Romans 7:11).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-21.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(20) Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?—The cry is partly of dismay, partly of excuse. Ahab, having no word of defence to utter, endeavours to attribute Elijah’s rebuke and condemnation to simple enmity, much as in 1 Kings 18:17 he cries out “Art thou he that troubleth Israel?” The crushing answer is that the prophet came not because he was an enemy, but because Ahab had “sold himself”—had become a slave instead of a king—under the lust of desire and the temptation of Jezebel.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-21.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Ahab said to Elijah, Hast thou found me, O mine enemy? And he answered, I have found thee: because thou hast sold thyself to work evil in the sight of the LORD.
Hast thou found me
18:17; 22:8; 2 Chronicles 18:7,17; Amos 5:10; Mark 12:12; Galatians 4:16; Revelation 11:10; Amos 5:10; Mark 12:12; Galatians 4:16; Revelation 11:10
thou hast sold
25; 2 Kings 17:17; Isaiah 50:1; 52:3; Romans 7:14
to work
16:30; 2 Kings 21:2; 2 Chronicles 33:6; Ephesians 4:19
Reciprocal: Exodus 5:1 - and told;  Judges 16:18 - brought money;  1 Samuel 13:13 - Thou hast done;  1 Samuel 19:17 - mine enemy;  2 Samuel 12:7 - Thou art;  2 Samuel 12:13 - David;  2 Kings 3:2 - but not;  2 Kings 3:14 - I would not look;  Proverbs 9:7 - GeneralProverbs 15:10 - grievous;  Proverbs 24:25 - them;  Proverbs 28:4 - but;  Proverbs 29:1 - GeneralProverbs 29:10 - The bloodthirsty;  Ecclesiastes 5:8 - regardeth;  Isaiah 30:10 - say;  Jeremiah 15:10 - a man;  Jeremiah 20:10 - we shall;  Jeremiah 38:4 - thus;  Ezekiel 3:8 - GeneralEzekiel 14:4 - I the Lord;  Micah 3:2 - hate;  Matthew 5:12 - for so;  Mark 6:19 - Herodias;  Mark 6:20 - feared;  Mark 11:18 - feared;  Mark 14:11 - and promised;  Luke 1:17 - power;  Luke 6:23 - for in;  John 7:7 - because;  Acts 5:28 - intend

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 21:20". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-21.html.