Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 9:27

And Hiram sent his servants with the fleet, sailors who knew the sea, along with the servants of Solomon.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Commerce;   Diplomacy;   Hiram;   Mariners (Sailors);   Tyre;   Thompson Chain Reference - Hiram;   Huram;   Mariners;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Commerce;   Holy Land;   Sciences;   Strangers in Israel;   Tyre;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Ophir;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Edom;   Ezion-geber;   Hiram;   Palestine;   Phoenicia;   Ship;   Solomon;   Treaty;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Know, Knowledge;   Obadiah, Theology of;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Hiram;   Ships;   Solomon;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Alliances;   Hiram;   Metals;   Ophir;   Phoenice;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Arabah;   Ezion-Geber;   Fleet;   King, Kingship;   Merchant;   Rivers and Waterways in the Bible;   Solomon;   Transportation and Travel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Alliance;   Hiram;   Israel;   Ships and Boats;   Solomon;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Remnant;   Ship ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hiram ;   Ship;   Shipmen;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Handicraft;   Hiram;   Solomon;   Tyre;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Alliances;   Handicraft;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Phoenicia;   Red Sea;   Ships and Boats;   Tyre;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Alliances;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Shipmen - See 1 Kings 5:6 note. With respect to the acquaintance of the Phoenicians with this particular sea, it may be observed that they are not unlikely to have had trading settlements there, as they had in the Persian Gulf, even at this early period. The commerce with Ophir was probably an established trade, previously either in their hands or in those of the Egyptians, when Solomon determined to have a share in it. The Egyptians had navigated the other arm of the Red Sea, and perhaps its lower parts, from a much more ancient period.

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These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-9.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Hiram sent in his navy his servants,.... And, according to 2 Chronicles 8:18, ships also but how he could send them from Tyre, which lay in the Mediterranean sea, to the above ports in the Red sea, without going a great way round, is not easy to conceive. Perhaps, as Gussetins conjecturesF3Ebr. Comment p. 628. , Hiram had a port in the Red sea for building and sending out ships, for the sake of his eastern navigation, and from thence he sent them to Solomon's ports in the same sea; but if what R. JaphetF4In Aben Ezra in Jon. ii. 5. observes is true, that the Red sea is mixed with the sea of Joppa by means of the river Rhinocurura, as is remarked by a learned manF5Texelii Phoenix, l. 3. c. 6. p. 243, 244. and who approves of the observation, and thinks it does not deserve the censure Dr. LightfootF6Miscellanies, c. 18. vol. 1. p. 1002, 1003. passes on it. If this, I say, can be supported, the difficulty is removed: so Abarbinel assertsF7Apud Manasseh, Spes Israelis, sect. 2. p. 20. , that a branch of the Nile flows into the Red sea: and another, passing through Alexandria, runs into the Mediterranean sea. This is the first navy of ships we read of; in the construction of which, as well as in the art of navigation, the Tyrians no doubt were greatly assisting to Solomon's servants, and which appears by what follows; and they are saidF8"Prima ratem ventis credere docta Tyros", Catullus. to be the first that made use of ships; and the invention of ships of burden, or merchant ships, such as these were, is by PlinyF9Nat. Hist. l. 7. c. 56. ascribed to Hippus the Tyrian: and the Tyrians were famous for merchandise, which they could not carry on with foreign nations without shipping; see Isaiah 23:8, the servants Hiram sent in Solomon's navy were

shipmen that had knowledge of the sea; of sea coasts and ports, of the manner of guiding and managing ships at sea, and of the whole art of navigation, so far as then known, for which the Tyrians were famous; see Ezekiel 27:3,

with the servants of Solomon; to instruct and assist them in naval affairs, they not having been used thereunto.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-9.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Hiram sent in the navy his servants, shipmen that had knowledge of the sea, with the servants of Solomon.

Knowledge of the sea — For which the Tyrians were famous. He sent also ships to join with Solomon's, not from Tyre, the city of Phoenicia; but from an island in the Red-sea, called Tyre, because it was a colony of the Tyrians, as Strabo notes.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-9.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 9:27 And Hiram sent in the navy his servants, shipmen that had knowledge of the sea, with the servants of Solomon.

Ver. 27. Shipmen that had knowledge of the sea.] The Tyrians and Phoenicians were famous all the world over for their great skill in navigation. Of the Hollanders, one saith, Peterent caelum navibus Belgae, si navibus peti posset. The Low-country men are brave seamen; and that the English are no less, our recent conflicts with them and our great achievements in the western parts have proclaimed.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-9.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The Tyrians were famous for

knowledge of the sea. He sent also ships to join with Solomon’s, 2 Chronicles 8:18; not from Tyre, the famous city of Phoenicia, which was in the midland sea, from whence he could not sail to the Red Sea without fetching a vast compass; but from an island in the Red Sea, called Tyre, because it was a colony of the Tyrians, as Strabo notes.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-9.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

27.Shipmen that had knowledge of the sea — Skilled in navigation. The Phenicians were the earliest and boldest navigators of antiquity. See the tribute to Tyrian wisdom and success in Ezekiel 28:1-5.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-9.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Fleet, from Tyre, (Calmet) or from the island of the same name, in the Red Sea. (Grotius)

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-9.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Hiram sent in the navy his servants, shipmen that had knowledge of the sea, with the servants of Solomon. No JFB commentary on this verse.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-9.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(27) Shipmen that had knowledge of the sea.—The Tyrians were known far and wide as the great sailors both of the Mediterranean and the seas beyond it, till they were rivalled and superseded by their own colonists in Carthage and by the Greeks. How greatly their seamanship, their commerce, and their civilisation impressed the imagination of Israel, is shown in the magnificent chapters of Ezekiel on the fate of Tyre (Ezekiel 26-28). The Israelites, on the contrary, had but little care for the sea, and little knowledge of seamanship. The coast line of Palestine is but scantily furnished with harbours; and even at the height of their power they were content to use the maritime skill of the Tyrians, without encroaching upon their commerce or attempting to seize their famous ports. This was natural; for their call to be a peculiar and separate people was absolutely incompatible with maritime enterprise and commerce. Even in this attempt at maritime expedition under Tyrian guidance, Solomon’s action was, as in other points, exceptional, departing from Israelite tradition; and we hear of no similar enterprise, except in the age of Ahab and Jehoshaphat, when the intermarriage of the royal houses of Israel and Phœnicia renewed the close connection with Tyre (1 Kings 22:48; 2 Chronicles 20:35). We observe, accordingly, that the sea is mostly regarded in the Old Testament in its terrible power of wave and storm, restrained from destroying only by the Almighty hand of God; and even the one psalm (Psalms 107:23-31), which describes the seafarer’s experience, dwells with awe on “God’s wonders in the deep.” In the description of the glory of “the new heaven and earth” of the hereafter, it is declared with emphasis that “there was no more sea” (Revelation 21:1).

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Hiram sent in the navy his servants, shipmen that had knowledge of the sea, with the servants of Solomon.
his servants
5:6,9; 22:49; 2 Chronicles 20:36,37
Reciprocal: Genesis 46:32 - their trade hath been to feed cattle;  1 Kings 10:11 - from Ophir;  2 Chronicles 8:17 - Eziongeber;  2 Chronicles 8:18 - General2 Chronicles 9:10 - brought gold;  Ezekiel 27:8 - wise;  Acts 27:27 - the shipmen

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:27". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-9.html.