Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 9:4

As for you, if you will walk before Me as your father David walked, in integrity of heart and uprightness, doing according to all that I have commanded you and will keep My statutes and My ordinances,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Blessing;   Government;   Probation;   Solomon;   Zeal, Religious;   Thompson Chain Reference - Example;   Home;   Parental;   The Topic Concordance - Obedience;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Samuel, First and Second, Theology of;   Temple;   Upright, Uprightness;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Integrity;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Temple of Jerusalem;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Alliance;   Israel;   Solomon;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hardening of Heart;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Dream;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Integrity;   Kings, Books of;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

See 1 Kings 3:14. Solomon‘s subsequent fall lends to these repeated warnings a special interest.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-9.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

1 Kings 9:4

If thou writ walk before Me, as David thy father walked.

Imperativeness of law

General Grant, while president, caused the injury of a woman by his fast driving. He invited a police officer to enter his buggy, and drove with him to the police station, where he paid a fine of twenty dollars for “fast and reckless driving.” President M’Kinley once had to reprove his driver for crossing a chalk-line which marked the limit of space allowed to carriages. He leaned his head out of the window, apologised to the policeman in charge, and ordered his driver to obey the rule at once. Obedience comes hard when we think that for some reason we ought to be exceptions to the rules that govern others. (J. B. Morgan.)

The power of a sainted parent

After the news of his father’s death, Thomas Carlyle set himself to describe with pride his peasant parent. A living picture he gives: the large head, grey ever since he could remember; the strong face, full of earnestness; the clear eyes, through which honesty streamed--his dear, good father! Only a common farmer, though. Digging and ditching were part of his work. He drove the plough through the furrow. But, writes Thomas, “his son also is part of his work. An inspiring example I owe him. The pale face stiffened into death will certainly impel me. I seem to myself the second volume of my father.” The dead spirit of the Ecclefechan farmer lived in the brilliant writer of books. The instructions of his father soaked into his very flesh and bone. He, being dead, yet shaped his life. O blessed office of parenthood! (F. Y. Leggatt.)

The law of obedience

To that law of truth that firmly fixes foundations for cathedrals, Ruskin adds the law of obedience. In springing his wall the architect must plumb the stones of obedience to the law of gravity. In springing his arch he must brace it, obeying the laws of resistance. In lifting his tower he must relate it to the temple, obeying the law of proportion and symmetry; and he who disobeys one fundamental law will find great nature puking his towers down over his head. For no architect builds as he pleases, but only as nature pleases, through laws of gravity, and stone and steel. In the kingdom of the soul also obedience is strength and life, and disobedience is weakness and death. In the last analysis liberty is a phantom, a dream, a mere figment of the brain. Society’s greatest peril of to-day is the demagogues who teach, and the ignorant classes who believe that there is such a thing as liberty. The planets have no liberty; they follow their sun. The seas know no liberty; they follow the moon in tidal waves. When the river refuses to keep within its banks, it becomes a curse and a destruction. It is the stream that is restrained by its banks that turns mill wheels for men. The clouds, too, have their beauty in that they are led forth in ranks and columns generaled by the night winds. And in proportion as things pass from littleness towards largeness they go toward obedience to law. (N. D. Hillis, D. D.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "1 Kings 9:4". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/1-kings-9.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And if thou wilt walk before me, as David thy father walked, in integrity of heart, and in uprightness..... Who, though guilty of many sins and failings in life, yet was sincere and upright in the worship of God, never apostatized from it, or fell into idolatry, which is what is chiefly respected:

to do according to all that I have commanded thee, and wilt keep my statutes and my judgments; observe all the laws of God, moral, ceremonial, and judicial.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-9.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And a if thou wilt walk before me, as David thy father walked, in integrity of heart, and in uprightness, to do according to all that I have commanded thee, [and] wilt keep my statutes and my judgments:

(a) If you walk in my fear, and withdraw yourself from the common manner of men, who follow their sensualities.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-kings-9.html. 1599-1645.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

A MOMENTOUS ‘IF’!

‘If thou wilt walk before Me.’

1 Kings 9:4

I. Special privileges and blessings conferred upon us make our responsibility greater.—Twice God appeared to Solomon in a vision, granting him honours and favours. He accepted the king’s work in building the Temple and answered his prayer for the hallowing of the house. He gave Solomon great wealth, power, and wisdom. All these made Solomon’s duty more sacred. When much is given to a man, much also shall be required. Solomon’s sin in departing from God was the greater because of his privileges. Whatever God gives to us is a sacred trust. The more He gives the graver is our responsibility. We have many privileges in our Christian land—what are we doing with them? Are we faithful?

II. All God’s promises are conditional.—Solomon must walk before God in integrity of heart and in uprightness, and must do all God’s commandments if he would continue to enjoy the honours and blessings which he had received. If he departed from God, the many promises made concerning him and to him would be forfeited. God has promised us many good things, but all are conditional upon our own faithfulness and obedience. If we are true to God He will bless us, and as long as we remain true He will continue to bless us. If we are false to Him we shall miss all the good that He had ready to bestow upon us.

III. The world is always the enemy of righteousness.—In Solomon’s time the world was idolatrous. All the other nations had gods of wood and stone—some material form which they could touch and see. It was the fashion then to worship idols. The spirit of the world is the same to-day. It does not worship idols, however, but it inclines to other forms of departure from God which are no less serious. Whether it be to worship a piece of stone, or to worship self in some form makes very little difference. We need to remember always the consequences of any leaving of God. Israel would be cut off, the hallowed Temple would be cast out of God’s sight, His people should be the byword among all nations always. Leaving God brings sorrow and turns blessings to curses.

IV. The great lesson is faithfulness to God.—Why should we forsake God? He is our best friend. He has loved us with a love that is infinite in its tenderness, and has stopped at no cost in redeeming us. If we are true to Him, all blessing and good are assured to us. If we are unfaithful to Him, sorrow and loss will ensue.

Illustrations

(1) ‘The abiding of God’s presence in the Temple would be dependent upon Solomon’s faithfulness. This suggests to us how much one man’s life may have to do with the abiding or the departure of God’s blessing from a place.’

(2) ‘These were very solemn warnings which were given to Solomon. When we remember that even in spite of all the warnings given to him he did turn away from the Lord, we need to learn that only God Himself can keep us from falling. We need to watch, lest we also drift away from Christ.’

(3) ‘The condition and the consequences are inseparably connected. No one can fulfil the condition of verse 6 and have the promise of verse 5. Balaam seemed to wish for this when he said, “Let me die the death of the righteous.” When one was asked whether he would be among the Puritans or the Cavaliers, he replied, “He would rather live with the worldling, hut die with the Puritan.” But it cannot be done. The future and the present are connected, as harvest is connected with seed time. “Be not deceived, God is not mocked, for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.”’

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Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/1-kings-9.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 9:4 And if thou wilt walk before me, as David thy father walked, in integrity of heart, and in uprightness, to do according to all that I have commanded thee, [and] wilt keep my statutes and my judgments:

Ver. 4. To do according to all.] "All" is a little word, but of large extent. He doeth not God’s will, but his own will, who doeth no more than himself will. Everything must be done as well as anything, else we do nothing.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-9.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

As David thy father walked; who, though he miscarried in some things, yet in the general course of his life was upright and faithful towards me.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-9.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Simplicity of heart. That is, in the sincerity and integrity of a single heart, as opposite to all double-dealing and deceit. (Challoner) --- External worship alone will not be acceptable. (Worthington) --- "God is worshipped by faith, hope, and charity." (St. Augustine, Ench. iii.)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

and. Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulg, read this "and" in the text.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-9.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And if thou wilt walk before me, as David thy father walked, in integrity of heart, and in uprightness, to do according to all that I have commanded thee, and wilt keep my statutes and my judgments:
And if thou
3:14; 8:25; 11:4,6,38; 14:8; 15:5; Genesis 17:1; Deuteronomy 28:1; 2 Chronicles 7:17,18; Job 23:11,12; Psalms 15:2; 26:1,11; Proverbs 20:7; Zechariah 3:7; Luke 1:6; 1 Thessalonians 4:1,2
in integrity
Proverbs 10:9; 28:18
Reciprocal: Genesis 20:5 - in the integrity;  1 Kings 3:6 - according;  1 Kings 11:10 - commanded;  2 Kings 16:2 - did not;  1 Chronicles 28:7 - if;  2 Chronicles 17:5 - the Lord;  Psalm 78:72 - according;  Psalm 101:2 - a perfect;  Psalm 116:9 - walk;  Isaiah 38:5 - God;  Jeremiah 17:25 - sitting

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 9:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-9.html.