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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Corinthians 5:3

inasmuch as we, having put it on, will not be found naked.


Adam Clarke Commentary

If so be that being clothed - That is, fully prepared in this life for the glory of God;

We shall not be found naked - Destitute in that future state of that Divine image which shall render us capable of enjoying an endless glory.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-corinthians-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

If so be that being clothed - This passage has been interpreted in a great many different ways. The view of Locke is given above. Rosenmuller renders it, “For in the other life we shall not be wholly destitute of a body, but we shall have a body.” Tyndale renders it, “If it happen that we be found clothed, and not naked.” Doddridge supposes it to mean, “since being so clothed upon, we shall not be found naked, and exposed to any evil and inconvenience, how entirely soever we may be stripped of everything we can call our own here below.” Hammond explains it to mean, “If, indeed, we shall, happily, be among the number of those faithful Christians, who will be found clothed upon, not naked.” Various other expositions may be seen in the larger commentaries. The meaning is probably this:

(1) The word “clothed” refers to the future spiritual body of believers; the eternal habitation in which they shall reside.

(2) the expression implies an earnest desire of Paul to be thus invested with that body.

(3) it is the language of humility and of deep solicitude, as if it were possible that they might fail, and as if it demanded their utmost care and anxiety that they might thus be clothed with the spiritual body in heaven.

(4) it means that in that future state, the soul will not be naked; that is, destitute of any body, or covering. The present body will be laid aside. It will return to corruption, and the disembodied Spirit will ascend to God and to heaven. It will be disencumbered of the body with which it has been so long clothed. But we are not thence to infer that it will be destitute of a body; that it will remain a naked soul. It will be clothed there in its appropriate glorified body; and will have an appropriate habitation there. This does not imply, as Bloomfield supposes, that the souls of the wicked will be destitute of any such habitation as the glorified body of the saints; which may be true - but it means simply that the soul shall not be destitute of an appropriate body in heaven, but that the union of body and soul there shall be known as well as on earth.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-corinthians-5.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

If so be that being clothed we shall not be found naked.

Not be found naked ... It is a gross error to suppose that this has any reference to the notion of the ancient Greeks, to the effect that "disembodied spirits were under the earth and capable of taking part in life anywhere in the universe."[8] Paul had in mind here the sad truth that some who might expect to be clad with the glorious resurrection body in the final judgment will have no such thing, but be found naked instead. True Christians will be gloriously clothed in eternity; but for those lukewarm and self-satisfied Christians who think their "faith alone" is all they need, eternal nakedness shall be their disappointment. That is why the apostle John instructed that class of Christians to "Buy of me (the Lord) white garments that thou mayest clothe thyself, and that the shame of thy nakedness be not made manifest" (Revelation 3:18). Although salvation is of grace and of the free gift of God, there is a certain "clothing of oneself" that is required of all who would not be naked in eternity. However people may deny this, it is true, as Paul will state dogmatically a little later in 2 Corinthians 5:10.

Wesley's comment on "We shall not be found naked" is most perceptive, saying that it referred to one whose appearance in the presence of the King was without "the wedding garment."[9] The application of the man without the wedding garment to the "nakedness" in view here is perfect (Matthew 22:11). In the Saviour's parable, the naked one was indeed a guest; he had been invited, had answered the call, and had accepted the King's invitation, even sitting down at his table; but not having the wedding garment, he was "naked" in the eyes of the King and was cast into "the outer darkness." In exactly the same way, Christians who neglect or refuse to do the things Christians are commanded to do will appear "naked" in judgment. "Faith only" is nakedness in the eyes of God.

[8] Norman Hillyer, op. cit., p. 1079.

[9] John Wesley, op. cit., in loco.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-corinthians-5.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

If so be that being clothed,.... This supposition is made with respect to the saints who shall be alive at Christ's second coming, who will not be stripped of their bodies, and so will "not be found naked", or disembodied, and shall have a glory at once put upon them, both soul and body; or these words are an inference from the saints' present clothing, to their future clothing, thus; "seeing we are clothed", have not only put on the new man, and are clothed and adorned with the graces of the Spirit, but are arrayed with the best robe, the wedding garment, the robe of Christ's righteousness,

we shall not be found naked; but shall be clothed upon with the heavenly glory, as soon as we are dismissed from hence. Some read these words as a wish, "O that we were clothed, that we might not be found naked!" and so is expressive of one of the sighs, and groans, and earnest desires of the saints in their present situation after the glories of another world.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-corinthians-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

2 If so be that being clothed we shall not be found naked.

(2) An exposition of the former saying: we do not without reason desire to be clad with the heavenly house, that is, with that everlasting and immortal glory, as with a garment. For when we depart from here we will not remain naked, having cast off the covering of this body, but we will take our bodies again, which will put on as it were another garment besides. And therefore we do not sigh because of the weariness of this life, but because of the desire of a better life. Neither is this desire in vain, for we are made to that life, the pledge of which we have, even the Spirit of adoption.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-corinthians-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

If so be, etc. — Our “desire” holds good, should the Lord‘s coming find us alive. Translate, “If so be that having ourselves clothed (with our natural body, compare 2 Corinthians 5:4) we shall not be found naked (stripped of our present body).”


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-corinthians-5.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Being clothed (ενδυσαμενοιendusamenoi). First aorist middle participle, having put on the garment.

Naked (γυμνοιgumnoi). That is, disembodied spirits, “like the souls in Sheol, without form, and void of all power of activity” (Plummer).


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/2-corinthians-5.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

If so be ( εἴ γε )

Assuming that.

Being clothed

Compare Job 10:11.

Naked ( γυμνοὶ )

Without a body. The word was used by Greek writers of disembodied spirits. See the quotation from Plato's “Gorgias” in note on Luke 12:20; also “Cratylus,” 403, where, speaking of Pluto, Socrates says: “The foolish fears which people have of him, such as the fear of being always with him after death, and of the soul denuded ( γυμνὴ ) of the body going to him.” Stanley cites Herodotus' story of Melissa, the Corinthian queen, who appeared to her husband after death, entreating him to burn dresses for her as a covering for her disembodied spirit (v., 92). The whole expression, being clothed - naked is equivalent to we shall not be found naked because we shall be clothed.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/2-corinthians-5.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

If so be that being clothed we shall not be found naked.

If being clothed — That is, with the image of God, while we are in the body.

We shall not be found naked — Of the wedding garment.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-corinthians-5.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

The meaning seems to be, if we shall be so happy as to be thus clothed and not left destitute and naked.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/2-corinthians-5.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

3.Since clothed He restricts to believers, what he had stated respecting the certainty of a future life, as it is a thing peculiar to them. For the wicked, too, are stripped of the body, but as they bring nothing within the view of God, but a disgraceful nakedness, they are, consequently, not clothed with a glorious body. Believers, on the other hand, who appear in the view of God, clothed with Christ, and adorned with His image, receive the glorious robe of immortality. For I am inclined to take this view, rather than that of Chrysostom and others, who think that nothing new is here stated, but that Paul simply repeats here, what he had previously said as to putting on an eternal habitation. The Apostle, therefore, makes mention here of a twofold clothing, with which God invests us — the righteousness of Christ, and sanctification of the Spirit in this life; and, after death, immortality and glory. The first is the cause of the second, because

those whom God has determined to glorify, he first justifies. (Romans 8:30.)

This meaning, too, is elicited from the particle also, which is without doubt introduced for the purpose of amplifying — as if Paul had said, that a new robe will be prepared for believers after death, since they have been clothed in this life also.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/2-corinthians-5.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

3 If so be that being clothed we shall not be found naked.

Ver. 3. If so be that, &c.] q.d. Howbeit, I know not whether we shall be so clothed upon, that is, whether we that are now alive shall be found alive at Christ’s coming to judgment, whether we shall then be found clothed with our bodies, or naked, that is, stripped of our bodies.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-corinthians-5.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

That is, if so be, at our passage hence, we shall have the happiness to be of the number of those who are found clothed with glory, or clothed with holiness and good works, to fit us for our clothing in glory; that we may not be found naked, in our natural turpitude of sin and spiritual nakedness, which will render us abominable in the sight of God.

Learn hence, That none can groan or long for heaven but such as are clothed with a gospel-righteousness, that of justification, sanctification, and new obedience: none shall be clothed upon with glory hereafter, but such as are clothed with grace and holiness here.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/2-corinthians-5.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

3.] seeing that ( εἴ γε (see var. readd.) is used ‘de re, quæ jure sumta creditur:’ εἴπερ, when ‘in incerto relinquitur, utrum jure an injuria sumatur.’ Herm. ad Viger., p. 834. So Xen. Mem. ii. 17, ἀλλὰ γάρ, ὦ σ., οἱ εἰς τὴν βασιλικὴν τέχνην παιδευόμενοι, ἢν δοκεῖς μοι σὺ νομίζειν εὐδαιμονίαν εἶναι, τί διαφέρουσι τῶν ἐξ ἀνάγκης κακοπαθούντων, εἴ γε πεινήσουσι κ. διψή σουσι, κ. τ. λ.,—‘if they are to hunger and thirst, &c.’ and for εἴπερ, Æsch. Ag. 29 f. εἴπερ ἰλίου πόλις ἑάλωκεν, ὡς ὁ φρυκτὸς ἀγγέλλων πρέπει, ‘if, that is, the city, &c.’) we shall really ( καί, ‘in very truth:’ so Soph. Antig. 766, ἄμφω γὰρ αὐτὰ καὶ κατακτεῖναι νοεῖς; ‘dost thou intend verily to kill them both?’ and Æsch. Sept. Theb. 810, ἐκεῖθι κἦλθον; ‘have they really come to that?’ See more examples in Hartung, Partikellehre, i. 132) be found (shall prove to be) clothed (‘having put on clothing,’ viz. a body), not naked (without a body—“ ἐνδυς., οὐ γυμν., as γάλα, οὐ βρῶμα, 1 Corinthians 3:2 and often, cf. 2 Corinthians 5:7.” Meyer. See Stanley’s note). The verse asserts strongly, with a view to substantiate and explain 2 Corinthians 5:2, the truth of the resurrection or glorified body; and, with Meyer, I see in it a reference to the deniers of the resurrection, whom the Apostle combated in 1 Corinthians 15.: its sense being this: “For I do assert again, that we shall in that day prove to be clothed with a body, and not disembodied spirits.”

Several other renderings have been given:—(1) ‘Si nos iste dies deprehendet cum corpore, non exutos a corpore,—si erimus inter mutandos, non inter mortuos,’ Grot.: Estius, Bengel, Conyb., al. To this there are three objections,—that εἴ γε should be εἴ περ (the force of this objection is however much weakened by the amount of authority which can be adduced for εἴπερ),—that καί is not rendered at all,—and that ἐνδυσάμενοι, the aor. mid., should be ἐνδεδυμένοι, the perf. pass. (2) The same objections apply to Billroth’s rendering, ‘If we, having been once clothed (with the earthly body), shall not be found naked’ (without the body). (3) De Wette renders: ‘seeing that when we are also (really) clothed, we shall not be found naked:’ i.e. ‘setting down for certain as we do, that that heavenly dwelling will also be a body.’ To this Meyer rightly objects, that it is open to the difficulty of making ἔνδυσις and γυμνότης, and that in the very sense in which they are opposites, to co-exist;—no clothing but that of a body is thought of here, or else οὐ σώματος γυμνοί must have been expressed. (4) This latter objection applies to the rendering of Chrys., Theodoret, Theophyl., Œcum., al., who take ἐνδυσάμενοι = σῶμα ἄφθαρτον λαβόντες, and γυμνοί to mean γυμνοὶ δόξης. Similarly Anselm explains γυμνοί, ‘nudi Christo;’ Pelagius, Hunnius, and Baldwin, ‘vacui fide:’ Erasm. Paraphr. ‘si tamen hoc exuti corpore non omnino nudi reperiamur, sed ex bonæ vitæ fiducia spe immortalitatis amicti:’ in part too Calvin,—restricting it however to the faithful only,—‘if at least we, having put on Christ in this life, shall not be found naked then.’ Olshausen too takes οὐ γυμνοί as an expansion of ἐνδυσάμενοι, ‘provided that we shall be found clothed with the robe of righteousness, not denuded of it.’ Of all these we may say, that if the Apostle had meant by γυμνοί to hint at any other kind of γυμνότης than that which the similitude obviously implies, he would have certainly indicated it. (5) The rendering of εἰutinam,’ ‘utinam etiam induti, non nudi reperiamur!’ as Knatchbull and Homberg, need hardly be refuted. (6) Another class of renderings arise from the reading ἐκ δυσάμενοι in a few cursives, which in connexion with εἴπερ was evidently adopted in consequence of the views of expositors. It stood as a conditional sentence,—‘provided, that is, that’ … and in the idea that it referred to the time after putting off the mortal body, ἐν was altered to ἐκ.

For much of the reference to opinions in this note I am indebted to Meyer and De Wette.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/2-corinthians-5.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

2 Corinthians 5:3. After 2 Corinthians 5:2 a comma only is to be placed, for 2 Corinthians 5:3 contains a supplementary definition to what precedes (comp. Hartung, Partikell. I. pp. 391, 395 f.), inasmuch as the presupposition is stated under which the ἐπενδύσασθαι ἐπιποθοῦμεν takes place: in the presupposition, namely, that we shall be found also clothed, not naked, i.e. that we shall be met with at the Parousia really clothed with a body, and not bodiless. The apostle’s view is that, while Christ at the Parousia descends from heaven, the Christians already dead first rise, then those still alive are transformed, whereupon both are then caught away into the higher region of the air ( εἰς ἀέρα) to meet the Lord, so that they thus at their meeting with the Lord shall be found not bodiless ( οὐ γυμνοί), but clothed with a corporeal covering(211) ( ἐνδυσάμενοι). See 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17, and Lünemann’s note thereon. This belief is here laid down as certainty by εἴγε κ. τ. λ., and as such it conditions and justifies the longing desire expressed in 2 Corinthians 5:2, which, on the contrary, would be vain and empty dreaming, if that belief were erroneous, i.e. if we at the Parousia should be found as mere spirits without corporeality; so that thus those still living, instead of being transformed, would have to die, in order to appear as spirits before the descending Christ. We cannot fail to see in the words an incidental reference to those of the Corinthians who denied the resurrection, and without the thought of them Paul would have had no occasion for adding 2 Corinthians 5:3; but the reference is such, as takes for granted that the deniers are set aside and the denied fact is certain. As the whole of this explanation is quite in keeping with the context and the conceptions of the apostle, so is it with the words, regarding which, however, it is to be observed that the certainty of what is posited by εἴγε, if namely, is not implied in this particle by itself (in opposition to Hermann’s canon, ad Viger. p. 834), but in the connection of the conception and discourse. Comp. on Ephesians 3:2, Galatians 3:4, and Baeumlein, Partik. p. 64 f. On καί, also, in the sense of really, see Hartung, Partikell. I. p. 132; and on εἴ γε καί, comp. Xen. Mem. iii. 6. 13. The participle ἐνδυσάμενοι refers, however, to the act of clothing previous to the εὑρεθησόμεθα, so that the aorist is quite in its right place (in opposition to Hofmann’s objection, that the perfect is required); and finally, the asyndeton ἐνδυσάμ., οὐ γυμνοί makes the contrasts come into more vivid prominence, like γάλα, οὐ βρῶμα, 1 Corinthians 3:2; Romans 2:29; 1 Thessalonians 2:17, and often; comp. 2 Corinthians 5:7. See Kühner, II. p. 461; Fritzsche, ad Marc. p. 31; Hermann, ad Viger. p. 887.

The most current exposition on the part of others is: “Si nos iste dies deprehendet cum corpore, non exutos a corpore, si erimus inter mutandos, non inter mortuos,” Grotius. So, following Tertullian (de Resurr. 41, though he reads ἐκδυσ.), Cajetanus, Castalio, Estius, Wolf, Bengel, Mosheim, Emmerling, Schrader, Rinck, and others, and, in the main, Billroth also, who, however, decides in favour of the reading εἴπερ, and deletes the comma after ἐνδυσάμ.: “which (i.e. the being clothed upon) takes place, if we shall be found (on the day of the Lord) otherwise than already once clothed (with the earthly body), not naked (like the souls of the dead),” so that ἐνδυσάμ. οὐ γυμνοὶ εὑρ. together would be: utpote jam semel induti non nudi inveniemur. Against that common explanation, which J. Müller, von der Sünde, II. p. 422 f., ed. 5, also follows with the reading εἴπερ, the aorist participle is decisive (it must have been ἐνδεδυμένοι).(212) Billroth, however, quite arbitrarily imports the already once, and, what could be more unnecessary, nay, vapid, than to give a reason for οὐ γυμνοί by means of ἐνδυσάμ. in the assumed sense: since we indeed have already once received a body! which would mean nothing else than: since we indeed are not born bodiless. Against Billroth, besides, see Reiche, p. 357 f. According to Fritzsche, Diss. I. p. 55 ff., ἐνδυσάμ. is held to be in essential meaning equivalent to ἐπενδυσάμ.: “Superinduere (immortale corpus vivi ad nos recipere) volumus, quandoquidem (quod certo scimus et satis constat, εἴγε) etiam superinduti (immortali corpore) non nudi sc. hoc immortali corpore, sumus futuri h. e. quandoquidem vel sic ad regni Mess. ἀφθαρσίαν perveniemus.” But while the ἐπενδυσάμενοι may be included as a species among the ἐνδυσάμενοι, as opposed to the γυμνοί, they cannot be meant exclusively. Besides, the thought: “since we too clothed upon will not be without the immortal body,” would be without logical import, because the superinduere is just the assumption of the future body, with which we attain to the ἀφθαρσία of the Messianic kingdom. According to de Wette, Paul says: “if, namely, also (in reality) clothed, we shall be found not naked (bodiless), i.e. as we then certainly presuppose that that heavenly habitation will be also a body.” So, in the main, Lechler, Apost. u. nachapost. Zeitalt. p. 138 f., Ernesti, Urspr. d. Sünde, I. p. 118, the latter taking εἴγε καί as although indeed. But the whole explanation is absurd, since the ἔνδυσις could not at all be conceived as at the same time its opposite, as γυμνότης; and had Paul wished to lay emphasis on the fact that the clothing would be none other than with a body (which, however, was quite obvious of itself), he must have used not the simple γυμνοί (not the simple opposite of ἐνδυσάμ.), but along with it the more precise definition with which he was concerned, something, therefore, like οὐ σώματος γυμνοί (Plato, Crat. p. 403 B, and the passages in Wetstein and Loesner). According to Delitzsch, l.c. p. 436, εἰ καί is taken as although, and ἐνδυσάμ. as contrast of ἐπενδυσάμ., so that there results as the meaning: though, indeed, we too, having acquired the heavenly body by means of clothing (not clothing over), shall be found not naked. As if this were not quite obvious of itself! When clothed, one certainly is not naked! no matter whether we have drawn the robe on or o2Co 5:Chrysostom, Theodoret, Theophylact, and Oecumenius take ἐνδυσάμ. as equivalent to σῶμα ἄφθαρτον λαβόντες, but γυμνοί as equivalent to γυμνοὶ δόξης, for the resurrection is common to all, but not the δόξα. So also Usteri, Lehrbegr. p. 392 f.: “We long after being clothed upon, which event, however, is desirable for us only under the condition or presupposition that we, though clothed, shall not be found naked in another sense,” namely, denuded of the garland which we should have gained. Here also we may place Olshausen (comp. Pelagius, Anselm, Calvin, Calovius, and others), who takes οὐ γυμνοί as epexegetical of ἐνδυσάμ., and interprets the two thus: if we, namely, are found also clothed with the robe of righteousness, not denuded of it. Comp. also Osiander, who thinks of the spiritual ornament of justification and sanctification; further, Hofmann on the passage and in his Schriftbew. II. 2, p. 473, who, putting a comma after εἴγε (“if we, namely, in consequence of the fact that we also have put on, shall be found not naked”), understands ἐνδυσάμενοι as a designation of the Christian status (the having put on Christ), which one must have in order not to stand forth naked and, therefore, unfitted for being clothed o2Co 5:But where in the text is there any suggestion of a garland, a robe, an ornament of righteousness, a putting on of Christ (Galatians 3:27; Romans 13:14), or of the Christian status (1 Thessalonians 5:8; Ephesians 6:14; Ephesians 4:24; Colossians 3:10), or anything else, which does not mean simply the clothing with the future body? Olshausen, indeed, is of opinion that there lies in καί a hint of a transition to another figure; but without reason, as is at once shown by what follows; and with equal justice any change in the figure at our pleasure might be admitted! This also in opposition to Ewald’s interpretation: “if we at least being also clothed (after we have had ourselves clothed, i.e. raised again) be found not naked, namely, guilty, like Adam and Eve, Genesis 3:11.” This would point to the resurrection of the wicked, Revelation 20:12-15; if we belonged to these, we should certainly not have the putting on of glorification to hope for. But such a reference was just as remote from the mind of the apostle, who is speaking of himself and those like him, as the idea of Adam and Eve, of whom Beza also thinks in γυμνοί, must, in the absence of more precise indication, have remained utterly remote from the mind of the reader.

REMARK.

Whether the reading ἐχδυσ. or ἐνδυσ. be adopted, it is not to be explained of an interim body between death and resurrection (Flatt, p. 69; Schneckenburger, l.c. p. 130; Schott; Auberlen in the Stud. u. Krit. 1852, p. 709; Martensen, § 276; Nitzsch, Göschel, Rinck, and others, including Reiche,(213) l.c.), of which conception there is no trace in the New Testament;(214) but rather, since γυμνοί can only refer to the lack of a body: if we, namely, even in the case that we shall be unclothed (shall have died before the Parousia), shall be found not naked (bodiless), in which the idea would be implied: assuming, namely, that we in every case, even in the event of our having died before the Parousia, will not appear before Christ without a body; hence the wish of attaining the new body without previous death is all the better founded ( ἐπενδύσασθαι). Similarly Rückert. Kling (in the Stud. u. Krit. 1839, p. 511) takes it inaccurately: “although we, even if an unclothing has ensued, will not be found bare,” by which Paul is held to say: “even if the severing process of death has ensued, yet the believers will not appear bodiless on the day of the Lord, since God gives them the resurrection-body.”(215) The error of this view lies in although. No doubt Kling, with Lachmann, reads εἴπερ. But even this never means quamvis (not even in 1 Corinthians 8:5), and the Homeric use of εἴπερ in the sense: if also nevertheless, if even ever so much (Odyss. i. 167; Il. i. 81, and Nägelsbach’s note thereon, p. 43, ed. 3), especially with a negative apodosis (see Hartung, I. p. 339; Kühner, II. p. 562), passed neither into the Attic writers nor into the N. T.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/2-corinthians-5.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

2 Corinthians 5:3. εἴγε καὶ, if indeed even [if so be]) That, which is wished for, 2 Corinthians 5:2, has place [holds good] should the last day find us alive.— ἐνδυσάμενοι, being clothed) We are clothed with the body, 2 Corinthians 5:4, in the beginning.— οὐ γυμνοὶ) not naked, in respect to [not stripped of] this body, i.e. dead.— εὐρεθησόμεθα, we shall be found) by the day of the Lord.


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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/2-corinthians-5.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Some make the clothing here spoken of different from the clothing before mentioned; and make this verse restrictive of what the apostle had before said, of the certainty which some have of being clothed upon with a glorious body.

If so be (saith the apostle) we shall not be found naked, but clothed, i.e. with the wedding garment of Christ’s righteousness; for concerning those that do not die in the Lord, that do not watch, and keep their garments, it is said, Revelation 16:15, they shall walk naked, and men shall see their shame. But considering the clothing before mentioned was not this clothing, but the superinducing of an immortal, incorruptible, glorious state of body, upon our mortal, corruptible state, some judicious interpreters think, that the clothing here mentioned is the clothing of the soul with the body. It is manifest that the apostles apprehended Christ’s second coming much nearer than it hath proved. Therefore he saith, 1 Thessalonians 4:15: We that are alive (supposing that generation might live) to Christ’s second coming; and 1 Corinthians 15:51: We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed. This some think (and that not improbably) is the cause of this passage; the sense of which they judge to be this: If so be that we be, at the resurrection, found in the flesh, clothed still with our bodies, and shall not be found naked, that is, stripped of our flesh, and dead before that time.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-corinthians-5.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Naked; destitute of a glorified body.


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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/2-corinthians-5.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

3. εἴ γε καὶ ἐνδυσάμενοι οὐ γυμνοὶ εὑρεθησόμεθα. See critical note. Here the metaphor of the garment is uppermost. Comp. the argument in Plato, Phaedo 87. In the Gorgias 523, the dead, having been deprived of their bodies, are called γυμνοί: and here γυμνός seems to mean ‘without a body.’ Comp. Crat. 403 and Orig. c. Cels. ii. 43. A man without his ἐπενδύτης was called γυμνός (John 21:7): still more would he be called γυμνός if he had also thrown off his χιτών. But if the ἐπενδύτης was on him the absence of the χιτών would not be felt. The clause explains the latter half of 2 Corinthians 5:2. ‘I say clothed upon, of course on the supposition that, when we are clothed upon, we shall not be found without any covering at all.’ Only those who are still in the body at the Second Advent (to which crisis the aorists refer) can be said to be clothed upon. The dead, who have left their bodies, may be said to be clothed, when they receive a heavenly body, but not clothed upon. Cremer (Lex. p. 163) contends that here γυμνός means ‘stripped of righteousness, guilty.’ But the passage is one of which the meaning is uncertain. See notes in the Speaker’s Commentary, pp. 418, 424. The καί adds emphasis to the assumption; ‘if indeed it so be,’ ‘if it really is the case.’ But this is perhaps too pronounced, and the force of the καί may be better given in intonation. Lightfoot on Galatians 3:4 remarks that εἴ γε “leaves a loophole for doubt, and καὶ widens this, implying an unwillingness to believe on the part of the speaker.” Elsewhere S. Paul speaks of the body, when the life is gone, as γυμνός (1 Corinthians 15:37). Comp. Enoch lxii. 15, 16; Secrets of Enoch xxii. 8.


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"Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/2-corinthians-5.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3. If so be—By the best reading, since it will be, the apostle expresses no doubt.

Clothed… not… naked—Commentators who, like Meyer, Alford, and Stanley, are haunted with the phantasm of Paul’s expectation of an immediate advent, make sad work here. St. Paul, say they, here expresses the hope that he may not die, and so be found naked, disembodied spirit; but may live until the resurrection change of 1 Corinthians 15. He did, no doubt, prefer the resurrection state to the disembodied, for he held it to be that consummation of glory which the intermediate state delays. That delay, though a higher glory than belongs to earth, is inferior to the final glory. It is imparadised, but not heavenly, bliss. It is a state of disorganization, produced by sin, and under the shadow of death waiting for that day to which St. Paul’s wish darts at once, when mortality shall be swallowed up of life, 2 Corinthians 5:4. The disembodied spirit is as unprepared to enter the heavenly mansions beyond the resurrection as an undressed person to enter a parlour.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-corinthians-5.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

2 Corinthians 5:3. seeing that we shall indeed be found clothed, not naked. This rendering, though not so literal as the Authorised Version, seems necessary to convey in our language what is certainly meant; Rendered as in our Authorised Version, a shade of doubt is undoubtedly conveyed to every English ear; while full certainty as to his eternal future is, in every varied form, conveyed here in almost every verse down to the ninth. And though competent scholars question whether in Biblical Greek the same certainty is conveyed by the particle here used as in classical Greek, vet, since this is only doubted, while it is admitted that the context must be our chief guide, we seem shut up by the present context—in order to exclude that shade of doubt which the Authorised Version suggests—to render the words as we have done. As to the word “naked” here, it would be a mistake to refer it, as some do, to the spiritual ‘defencelessness’ in which the wicked will be found at the great day—an idea foreign to the passage, and particularly incongruous just after an assurance of the very opposite had just been expressed. Bengel’s idea, too, is equally alien from the manifest sense—‘if so be we shall be found not in the disembodied state of the deceased’ when Christ comes. The next verse points to the real allusion—to that notion (so natural to all thoughtful Pagans, who were strangers to the doctrine of a resurrection) that the body, in its very nature, is nothing better than a clog to the only real part of man, his soul, which will never be capable of full development till disengaged by death from that encumbrance. (In this the best interpreters agree.)


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/2-corinthians-5.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

2 Corinthians 5:3. εἴ γε καὶ ἐνδυσάμενοι κ. τ. λ.: if so be that ( εἴ γε = siquidem; cf. Ephesians 3:2; Ephesians 4:21, Colossians 1:23) we shall be found also clothed, sc., with the heavenly body (note ἐνδυς., not ἐπενδυς., which would only be appropriate of the body to be “superindued” in the case of one surviving to the Second Advent), not naked, sc., disembodied spirits at the Day of His Appearing, a condition from the thought of which he shrinks. γυμνός was commonly used in this sense in Greek philosophy; Alford quotes Plato, Cratyl., p. 277 c., ψυχὴ γυμνὴ τοῦ σώματος (see 1 Corinthians 15:37); cf. also Philo de Hum., 4, τῆς ψυχῆς ἀπογυμνουμένης.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/2-corinthians-5.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

===============================

[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Si tamen vestiti, non nudi inveniamur, Greek: eige kai endusamenoi: some read, Greek: ekdusamenoi. See St. John Chrysostom.


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-corinthians-5.html. 1859.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

Verse 3 Paul longed for the day of the Lord"s coming when he might lay aside this physical body and put on the spiritual.


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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/2-corinthians-5.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

If. App-, a.

being clothed. Greek. enduo, Compare 1 Corinthians 15:53, 1 Corinthians 15:54. Compare Job 10:11 (Septuagint)

not. App-105.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-corinthians-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

If so be that being clothed we shall not be found naked.

If so be ... [B Delta G read ei (Greek #1487) per (Greek #4007), provided that, if so be: 'Aleph (') C, ei-ge (Greek #1489), seeing that, since.] Our 'desire' holds good should Christ's coming find us alive. Translate, 'that is [ kai (Greek #2532)], if so be that having had ourselves (already) clothed (with our natural body, cf. 2 Corinthians 5:4), we shall not be found naked,' (stripped of it). Olshausen takes it improbably, 'having put on the robe of righteousness.'


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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-corinthians-5.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

Without a body. Greek thought saw the immortal soul living forever without any body at all! Paul and the others proclaimed a raising from death which included a new body. Compare 2 Peter 3:13 and notes.


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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/2-corinthians-5.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) If so be that being clothed . . .—The Greek particles express rather more than the English phrase does, the truth of what follows. “If, as I believe . . .,” though not a translation, would be a fair paraphrase. The confident expectation thus expressed is that in the resurrection state the spirit will not be “naked,” will have, i.e., its appropriate garment, a body—clothing it with the attributes of distinct individuality. To the Greek, Hades was a world of shadows. Of Hades, as an intermediate state, St. Paul does not here speak, but he is sure that, in the state of glory which seemed to him so near, there will be nothing shadowy and unreal. The conviction is identical with that expressed in 1 Corinthians 15:35-49, against those who, admitting the immortality of the spirit, denied the resurrection of the body.


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-corinthians-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

If so be that being clothed we shall not be found naked.
being
Genesis 3:7-11; Exodus 32:25; Revelation 3:18; 16:15

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-corinthians-5.html.

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Thursday, October 22nd, 2020
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