Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 14:7

He killed of Edom in the Valley of Salt 10,000 and took Sela by war, and named it Joktheel to this day.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Edomites;   Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Joktheel;   Massacre;   Salt;   Sela;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Edomites, the;   Kings;   Rocks;   Salt;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Amaziah;   Idumea;   Joash or Jehoash;   Joktheel;   Salt;   Sela;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Edom;   Palestine;   Salt;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Edom;   Jehoash;   Joktheel;   Salt, Valley of;   Sela;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Arabia;   Edom;   Joktheel;   Salt, Valley of;   Sela;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Joktheel;   Petra;   Salt, Valley of;   Sela;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Edom, Edomites;   Joktheel;   Rock;   Salt, Valley of;   Sela;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Amaziah ;   Joash ;   Joktheel ;   Salt, Valley of;   Sela, Selah ;   Yale, Valley;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Amaziah;   Idumaeans;   Salt valley of;   Sela;   Smith Bible Dictionary - E'dom, Idumae'a;   Jok'the-El;   Salt, Valley of,;   Se'la,;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Amaziah;   Dead Sea, the;   Edom;   Elath;   Jekuthiel;   Joktheel;   Judah, Kingdom of;   Salt;   Salt, Valley of;   Sela;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Nabatæ;   Petra;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He slew of Edom to the valley of salt - This war is more circumstantially related in 2 Chronicles 25:5, etc. The Idumeans had arisen in the reign of Joram king of Judah, and shaken off the yoke of the house of David. Amaziah determined to reduce them to obedience; he therefore levied an army of three hundred thousand men in his own kingdom, and hired a hundred thousand Israelites, at the price of one hundred talents. When he was about to depart at the head of this numerous army, a prophet came to him and ordered him to dismiss the Israelitish army, for God was not with them: and on the king of Judah expressing regret for the loss of his hundred talents, he was answered, that the Lord could give him much more than that. He obeyed, sent back the Israelites, and at the head of his own men attacked the Edomites in the valley of salt, slew ten thousand on the spot, and took ten thousand prisoners, all of whom he precipitated from the rock, or Selah, which was afterwards called Joktheel, a place or city supposed to be the same with Petra, which gave name to Arabia Petraea, where there must have been a great precipice, from which the place took its name of Selah or Petra.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Amaziah‘s Idumaean war is treated at length by the writer of Chronicles (marginal reference).

The “Valley of Salt” is usually identified with the broad open plain called the Sabkah, at the southern end of the Dead Sea - the continuation of the Ghor or Jordan gorge. At the north-western corner of this plain stands a mountain of rock-salt, and the tract between this mountain and the sea is a salt-marsh. Salt springs also abound in the plain itself, so that the name would be fully accounted for. It is doubted, however, whether the original of the word “valley,” commonly used of clefts and ravines, can be applied to such a sunk plain as the Sabkah; and it is certainly most unlikely that 10,000 prisoners would have been conveyed upward of eighty miles (the distance of the Sabkah from Petra), through a rough and difficult country, only in order to be massacred. On the whole, it is perhaps most probable that the “Valley of Salt” yet remains to be discovered, and that its true position was near Selah or Petra (see Judges 1:36 note). Amaziah gave to Petra the name Joktheel, “subdued by God,” in a religious spirit as an acknowledgment of the divine aid by which his victory was gained. The name failed to take permanent hold on the place, because the Edomites, on not long afterward recovering their city, restored the old appellation (2 Chronicles 28:17; compare Isaiah 16:1, and Amos 1:11).

Unto this day - The writer of Kings evidently gives the exact words of his document, composed not later than the reign of Ahaz, before whose death the Edomites had recovered Petra.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-14.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He slew of Edom in the valley of Salt ten thousand,.... Of which valley; see Gill on 2 Samuel 8:13, the Edomites having revolted from Judah in the days of Joram, 2 Kings 8:20. Amaziah undertook to reduce them with an army of 300,000 choice men; and, besides these, hired also of Israel 100,000 valiant men, for one hundred talents of silver; but at the instance of a prophet of the Lord he dismissed the latter, and went against Edom only with his men, and slew of the Edomites 10,000, besides other 10,000 he took alive, and cast headlong from a rock, which came into his hands, see 2 Chronicles 25:5,

and took Selah by war; which signifies a rock, the same with Petra, the metropolis of Arabia Petraea, the country of the Edomites. The city itself was not a rock, nor built on one, but was situated in a plain, surrounded with rocks and mountains, as StraboF26Geograph. l. 16. p. 536. and PlinyF1Nat. Hist. l. 6. c. 28. relate, from whence it seems to have its name; and by the Syrians called Recem, where Rocan a king of Midian reignedF2Hieron. de loc. Heb. fol. 93. M. & 94. A. Vid. Joseph. Antiqu. l. 4. c. 7. sect. 1. , called in the Greek version of Numbers 31:8, Recon; though VitringaF3Comment. in Jesaiam, c. 16. 1. is of opinion, that not Petra, the metropolis of Edom, is meant, but Maalehakrabbim, Joshua 15:3, which lay on the south border of Judea, near the salt sea:

and called the name of it Joktheel; which signifies "the obedience of God"; in memory of his obedience to the prophet of the Lord, in consequence of which he obtained this victory: and the name continued unto this day: the time of the writing this book.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

He slew of c Edom in the valley of salt ten thousand, and took Selah by war, and called the name of it Joktheel unto this day.

(c) For the Idumeans, whom David had brought to subjection, rebelled in the time of Jehoram son of Jehoshaphat.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

2 Kings 14:7. He smites Edom.

He slew of Edom in the valley of salt ten thousand — In the reign of Joram the Edomites had revolted (see 2 Kings 8:20). But Amaziah, determined to reduce them to their former subjection, formed a hostile expedition against them, in which he routed their army and made himself master of their capital.

the valley of salt — that part of the Ghor which comprises the salt and sandy plain to the south of the Dead Sea.

Selah — literally, “the rock”; generally thought to be Petra.

Joktheel — that is, “given” or “conquered by God.” See the history of this conquest more fully detailed (2 Chronicles 25:6-16).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-kings-14.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He slew of Edom in the valley of salt ten thousand, and took Selah by war, and called the name of it Joktheel unto this day.

Joktheel — Which signifies, the obedience of God, that is, given him by God as a reward of his obedience to God's message by the prophet, 2 Chronicles 25:8,9.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-14.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Edom

See 2 Chronicles 25:5-16.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 2 Kings 14:7". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/2-kings-14.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 14:7 He slew of Edom in the valley of salt ten thousand, and took Selah by war, and called the name of it Joktheel unto this day.

Ver. 7. In the valley of Salt.] Near to the Lake Asphaltites, which yielded much salt. (a) See 2 Samuel 8:13.

Ten thousand.] Besides ten thousand more whom he cast down from a rock; [2 Chronicles 25:11-12] not to make himself and the soldiers sport with, as the cruel Spaniards have dealt by the poor Indians, - but because they still stood out, as it is likely.

And took Selah.] Or, Petra, {see Isaiah 16:1} the chief city of Arabia Petraea, called afterwards Philadelphia by Ptolemy Philadelph, who repaired it. (b) Amaziah calleth it Jockteel, i.e., obedience to God, or the congregation of God, as Pagnine expoundeth it.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Kings 14:7. Took Selah—and called the name of it Joktheel As סלע selang in the Hebrew signifies a rock, and exactly answers to the Greek word Petra, the generality of commentators with good reason have agreed, that this Selah is the same with Petra, the metropolis of Arabia Petraea, whence the whole country, which also was very rocky, took its name. He gave it the name of Joktheel, which signifies obedience to God, probably as having obliged the inhabitants to observe the laws and statutes of Moses. See Grotius and Wells's Geography.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-kings-14.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Of Edom, i.e. of the Edomites, or the children of Seir, as they are called, 2 Chronicles 25:11; either because they dwelt in Seir; see Genesis 36:8; or because these people were confederates. And he invaded these people because they were subjects to his kingdom, from which they had revolted in Joram’s days, 2 Kings 8:20.

The valley of salt; which was the land of Edom; of which see 2 Samuel 8:13 Psalms 60:1.

Selah, or,

the rock; the chief city of that part of Arabia, called by other authors Petra, which signifies a rock, because it was built upon a rock, 2 Chronicles 25:12.

Joktheel, which signifies the obedience of God, i.e. given him by God as a reward of his obedience to God’s message by the prophet, 2 Chronicles 25:8,9.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7.Slew of Edom — The Edomites had cast off the yoke of Judah in the days of Jehoram, (2 Kings 8:20,) and had so strengthened themselves that, according to 2 Chronicles 25:5-6, Amaziah considered it necessary to lead an army of four hundred thousand men against them. See the parallel passage in Chronicles for a fuller record of this Edomite war.

Valley of salt — The broad, open plain at the lower end of the Dead Sea, which virtually forms the southern termination of the Ghor, or great Jordan valley. It is appropriately called the Salt Valley from the salt mountain at its northwestern extremity, and the brackish springs and streams that are found in it. In this same valley David once smote the Edomites. See note on 2 Samuel 8:13.

Selah — More properly written, as in Isaiah 16:1, Sela; Hebrew, שׂלע, or השׂלע, the rock. The capital city of the Edomites, situated in Mount Seir, two days’ journey south of the Valley of Salt, at the eastern base of Mount Hor. By the Greek writers it is called Petra. Strabo and Pliny describe it as a narrow valley, shut in by precipitous rocks and inaccessible mountains, but having a stream running through it fed by copious fountains and supplying water for the irrigation of gardens. After the Mohammedan conquest its site was long unknown, but, discovered A.D. 1812 by Burckhardt, it has since been many times visited and described by travellers. Its site and ruins are represented as among the most wonderful things of the Orient. It is a city whose most imposing remains consist of tombs and temples sculptured in the solid rock. And not the least remarkable thing, according to Robinson, is the colour of the rocks. “They present an endless variety of bright and living hues, from the deepest crimson to the softest pink, verging also sometimes to orange and yellow.” The principal entrance to the city is from the east, through a wild, deep chasm, called the Sik, varying in width from twelve to fifty feet. At a point where this chasm takes a sharp turn stands the celebrated structure called the Khazneh, which, says Palmer, “in beauty of form and colouring surpasses all the other tombs and temples. The facade is of a deep but delicate rose colour, and that of the uncut rock around it varies from every shade of red to chocolate.” This writer plausibly conjectures that it represents “the museum of Petra, the philharmonic institution of the place.” The other principal remains are the theatre, the tomb with three rows of columns, the ruined bridges, and the triumphal arch. “In looking at the wonders of this ancient city,” writes Robinson, “one is at a loss whether most to admire the wildness of the position and natural scenery, or the taste and skill with which it was fashioned into a secure retreat, and adorned with splendid structures, chiefly for the dead.”

Called the name of it Joktheel — The name signifies subdued by God, but does not seem to have been commonly applied to the place for any considerable length of time, for it does not again occur, and Isaiah calls the place by its old name, Sela. 2 Kings 16:1. The phrase unto this day, indicates, therefore, that this record of Amaziah’s conquest was written during the Jewish rule over Edom, and before the time of Ahaz, when the Edomites had again thrown off the Hebrew yoke. 2 Chronicles 28:17.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-14.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 14:7. He slew of Edom — That is, of the Edomites, or the children of Seir, as they are called 2 Chronicles 25:1. The Edomites, after having been subject to Judah from the time of David, who subdued them, revolted in the days of Jehoram, (2 Kings 8:10,) and now Amaziah endeavoured to reduce them: and having, at the command of God, abandoned the help of the Israelites, although he had purchased it with a large sum, (2 Chronicles 25:7-10,) he and the men of Judah gained a great victory over them, and made the following slaughter. In the valley of Salt — Which was in the land of Edom. And took Selah — Or, the rock, as the word signifies. This city, called by other authors Petra, which also means a rock, was the metropolis of all that part of Arabia, termed from hence Arabia Petræa, or Arabia the rocky. And called the name of it Joktheel — Which word signifies, the obedience of God; so he named it, either, because, having taken it, he established in it, as some think, the laws and statutes of Moses; or rather, because he considered it as given him by God, as a reward of his obedience to God’s message by the prophet, requiring him to dismiss all the forces which he had hired of the Israelites.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-14.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Edom, who had rebelled under Joram, chap. viii. 20. The particulars of this war are given, 2 Paralipomenon xxv. 5. Josephus ([Antiquities?] ix. 9.) says, Amasias designed also to attack Amalec and Gebal in the same country. --- Pits. Called the woody vale, Genesis xiv. 8., (Menochius) south-west of the Dead Sea, (Adrichomius) or rather to the south of Palmyra, towards Bosra, 3 Kings ix. 18. --- Rock. Petra, the capital of the country, formerly called Rekem Arke, or Hagor. Most of the houses are hewn out of the rock. Hebrew Sela signifies "a rock;" and many think that this was some other place, whence the Idumeans were hurled down, after the victory. Amasias gave it the name of Jectehel, "obedience of God," in memory of his having obtained this success, in consequence of his having obeyed the prophet, and sent away 100,000, for whom he had paid 100 talents to the king of Israel.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

He slew. The account in Chronicles supplies additional particulars. See 2 Chronicles 25:5-11.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He slew of Edom in the valley of salt ten thousand, and took Selah by war, and called the name of it Joktheel unto this day.

He slew of Edom in the valley of Salt ten thousand. In the reign of Joram the Edomites had revolted (see the notes at 2 Kings 8:20). But Amasiah, determined to reduce them to their former subjection, formed a hostile expedition against them,, in which he routed their army, and made himself master of their capital. "The valley of Salt" is that part of the Ghor which composes the salt and sandy plain to the south of the Dead Sea.

Selah, [ ha-Cela` (Hebrew #5554), the rock] - generally thought to be Petra.

Joktheel - i:e., given or conquered by God. (See the history of this conquest more fully detailed, 2 Chronicles 25:6-16.)

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) He slew.—Rather, he it was that smote.

The valley of salt.—Comp. 2 Samuel 8:13. El-Ghôr, the salt plain of the Dead Sea, which Amaziah would traverse in marching against Edom.

Ten thousand.—The number slain in one conflict.

Selah.—Heb., the Sèlac, i.e., the crag. The Hebrew name of the famous rock-hewn town of Petra.

By war.—Or, in the battle. After the decisive engagement, Amaziah’s troops forced their way through the narrow defile leading to the Edomite capital, probably meeting no great resistance.

Joktheel.—A town of Judah bore this name (Joshua 15:38). The name probably means God’s ward, referring to the wonderful strength of the natural position of the town. Others explain, subjugated of God.

Unto this day—i.e., unto the time when the original document was written, from which the writer derived this notice.

The reduction of the capital implies that of the country. The defeat of Jehoram (2 Kings 8:20, seq.) was thus avenged. Chronicles gives a more detailed account of the re-conquest of Edom, and its consequences (2 Chronicles 25:5-16). it is there related that Amaziah hired a large force of mercenaries from the northern kingdom, but sent them home again at the bidding of a prophet. On their way back they attacked and plundered certain of the cities of Judah. The fall of Selah was followed by a massacre of captives. The gods of Edom, which Amaziah carried off, proved a snare to him. (See the Notes on the passage.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He slew of Edom in the valley of salt ten thousand, and took Selah by war, and called the name of it Joktheel unto this day.
A. M. 3177. B.C.827. slew
8:20-22; 2 Chronicles 25:11,12
the valley of salt
Some suppose that the Valley of Salt was south of the Dead, or Salt Sea, towards the land of Edom; and others suppose it to be the Valley of Salt, about three or four miles south-east of Palmyra, which now supplies, in a great measure, the surrounding country with salt.
2 Samuel 8:13; 1 Chronicles 18:12; Psalms 60:1; *title
Selah
or, the rock. Selah is generally supposed to be the same as Petra, which in Greek signifies a rock, the celebrated capital of Arabia Petræa. Strabo places it three or four days' journey from Jericho, and five days' journey from the forest of palm trees on the Red Sea. Pliny places it 600 miles from Gaza, and 125 from the Persian Gulf; but Cellarius and Reland very justly consider that the numbers have been changed, and that we ought to read 125 miles from Gaza, and 600 from the Persian Gulf. Eusebius places Beerothbenejaakan 30 miles west from Petra, and Elath ten miles east; and Burckhardt discovered the ruins of this ancient city in a valley called Wady Mousa.
Joktheel
Joshua 15:38
Reciprocal: Genesis 27:40 - serve;  Isaiah 16:1 - from;  Obadiah 1:3 - thou

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 14:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-14.html.