Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 20:17

‘Behold, the days are coming when all that is in your house, and all that your fathers have laid up in store to this day will be carried to Babylon; nothing shall be left,' says the Lord .
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Babylon;   Hezekiah;   Isaiah;   Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Prophecy;   Reproof;   Rich, the;   Temptation;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Hezekiah;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Babylon;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Babylon, Kingdom of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Eunuch;   Jehoiachin;   Manasseh (2);   Holman Bible Dictionary - Assyria, History and Religion of;   Babylon, History and Religion of;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Isaiah, Book of;   Israel;   Text, Versions, and Languages of Ot;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Hezekiah;   Manasseh;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Hezekiah;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Hezeki'ah;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Judah;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Alliance;   Carry;   Hezekiah (2);   Sennacherib;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Merodach-Baladan;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Behold, the days come - This was fulfilled in the days of the latter Jewish kings, when the Babylonians had led the people away into captivity, and stripped the land, the temple, etc., of all their riches. See Daniel 1:1-3.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-20.html. 1832.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Behold, the days come, that all that is in thine house, and that which thy fathers have laid up in store unto this day, shall be carried into Babylon: nothing shall be left, saith the LORD.

Behold — This judgment is denounced against him for his pride; for his ingratitude, whereby he took that honour to himself which he should have given entirely to God; and for his carnal confidence in that league which he had now made with the king of Babylon, by which, it is probable, he thought his mountain to be so strong, that it could not be removed.

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Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-20.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 20:17 Behold, the days come, that all that [is] in thine house, and that which thy fathers have laid up in store unto this day, shall be carried into Babylon: nothing shall be left, saith the LORD.

Ver. 17. That all that is in thine house.] So that thou hast made a fair hand of all, forfeited all by thine ostentation, ambition, and creature confidence.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-20.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

This judgment is denounced against him for his pride, which God exceedingly abhors; and for his ingratitude, whereby he took that honour to himself which he should have given entirely to God, and abused God’s gifts and favours to the gratification of his own lusts; of both which see 2 Chronicles 32:25,26; and for his carnal confidence in that league which he had now made with the king of Babylon, by which, it is probable, he thought his mountain to be so strong, that it could not be removed.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-20.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

17.Shall be carried unto Babylon — This seems to have been the first explicit prophecy of this great woe of Judah, though Micah’s (iv, 10) prediction of the same event must have been nearly contemporary. The prophecy is especially remarkable, since Babylon was at this time an inferior power, little more than a dependency of Assyria, whose leading men had risen in rebellion; and there was far more probability that Judah would be carried into exile either by the king of Assyria or by the king of Egypt, which two at the time seemed to divide the empire of the world between them.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-20.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 20:17. Behold, the days come, &c. — So small was the power of the Babylonians at this time, in respect of their mighty neighbour, the king of Assyria, whom the Jews stood in perpetual fear of, that nothing could seem more improbable than that the Babylonians should carry away the inhabitants of Jerusalem captive. But the divine providence ruleth over all, and sees from the beginning to the end; and, accordingly, in about a hundred and twenty-five years after, the event proved that the word of the Lord stands fast for ever, and that what he speaks shall surely come to pass. Thus short-sighted is human policy! Thus does our ruin often arise from that in which we most place our confidence!

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-20.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Babylon, under the last kings of Juda. It cannot be explained of Sennacherib, chap. xviii. 15.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-20.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Behold. Figure of speech Asterismos.

into Babylon. Compare 2 Chronicles 33:11, and see note on 2 Kings 20:12. A remarkable prophecy, as Babylon was of little account as yet (compare Isaiah 39:6). The return from Babylon was also foretold (Isaiah 48:49).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-20.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(17) Behold, the days come . . .—Comp. 2 Chronicles 32:25-26; 2 Chronicles 32:31. It is there said that Divine wrath fell upon Hezekiah, because his heart was lifted up; and that the Babylonian embassy was an occasion in which God made proof of his inward tendencies. Self-confidence and vanity would be awakened in Hezekiah’s heart as he displayed all his resources to the envoys, and heard their politic, and perhaps hyperbolical, expressions of wonder and delight, and himself, it may be, realised for the first time the full extent of his prosperity. But it was not only the king’s vanity which displeased a prophet who had always consistently denounced foreign alliances as betokening deviation from absolute trust in Jehovah; and a more terrible irony than that which animates the oracle before us can hardly be conceived. Thy friends, he cries, will prove robbers, thine allies will become thy conquerors. That Isaiah should have foreseen that Assyria, then in the heyday of its power, would one day be dethroned from the sovereignty of the world by that very Babylon which, at the time he spoke, was menaced with ruin by the Assyrian arms, can only be accepted as true by those who accept the reality of supernatural prediction. Thenius remarks: “An Isaiah might well perceive i what fate threatened the little kingdom of Judah, in case of a revolution of affairs brought about by the Babylonians.” But the tone of the prophecy is not hypothetical, but entirely positive. Besides, Isaiah evidently did not suppose that Merodach-baladan’s revolt would succeed. (Comp. Isaiah 14:29, seq., 21:9.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, the days come, that all that is in thine house, and that which thy fathers have laid up in store unto this day, shall be carried into Babylon: nothing shall be left, saith the LORD.
shall be carried
24:13; 25:13-15; Leviticus 26:19; 2 Chronicles 36:10,18; Jeremiah 27:21,22; 52:17-19
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 11:12 - in thy days;  2 Kings 22:16 - Behold;  2 Kings 24:2 - according;  Job 20:28 - increase;  Psalm 87:4 - Babylon;  Isaiah 39:6 - that all;  Jeremiah 20:5 - I will deliver;  Daniel 1:3 - General

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-20.html.